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General Bulletin 2008-2010

The School of Education, Health and Society

General Information

The School of Education, Health and Society is comprised of five departments: Educational Leadership, Educational Psychology, Family Studies and Social Work, Kinesiology and Health, and Teacher Education.

Each undergraduate program uses the Miami Plan for Liberal Education as a base, adds the specialized content of the major, adds appropriate professional courses, and may integrate experience in field settings through observation, practicum, and internships.

Graduate programs are offered in several fields and lead to a Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Teaching, Master of Education, Master of Science, Specialist in Education, Doctor of Education, or a Doctor of Philosophy. See the Graduate Bulletin for details on those programs.

Mission Statement

The EHS community, while committed to fulfilling traditional economic roles, endeavors to develop expanded roles consistent with our vision. We are committed to integrating our teaching, scholarship, and service.

Accreditation

Accreditation, which specifies standards for faculty, curriculum, financial support, equipment, student services, and facilities, is awarded to the School of Education, Health and Society by North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, National Association for the Education of Young Children, American Dietetic Association, Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE), National Association for School Psychologists, and State of Ohio Department of Education. The Council on Social Work Education has accredited the social work baccalaureate program.

Professional and Honorary Organizations

For professional development, the School of Education , Health and Society encourages participation in professional organizations where students can develop leadership skills, interact with professionals, and engage in educational activities. Organizations sponsored by the School include: Miami Council for the Social Studies, Miami University Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Miami University Science Educators, Miami University Student Athletic Trainers Association, Pre-Physical and Occupational Therapy Club, Student Council for Exceptional Children, Comparative Education Club, Ohio Student Education Association (OSEA), Dance Theatre, National Council of Teachers of English–Student Affiliate of Miami (NCTE-SAM), Student Dietetic Association, Student National Education Association, and Family Studies and Social Work Student Organization (FSWSO).

To honor outstanding professional and academic performance, the School is recognized with chapters of the following honoraries: Delta Psi Kappa, Epsilon Phi Tau, Kappa Delta Epsilon, Kappa Delta Pi, Kappa Phi Kappa, Phi Delta Kappa, Phi Epsilon Kappa, and Pi Omega Pi.

Art and Music Education

Art and music education programs, administered through the School of Fine Arts, are described in that chapter. Students preparing to teach art must plan their programs with an art education adviser in the Department of Art. Students interested in music education should consult an adviser in the Department of Music.

Supervised Teaching Policy

Supervised teaching, also called "student teaching," is a period of guided teaching when licensure program majors take increasing responsibility for learning activities of students in a classroom. It includes full-day off campus assignments for an entire semester, facilitated by a university supervisor in a school in cooperation with a licensed classroom teacher.

Student teachers are participants in all phases of the school program. They teach classes, organize and direct extracurricular activities, attend faculty meetings, and participate in other school functions.

Placements are in the Miami University designated geographic area in southwestern Ohio. Student teachers are required to make their own transportation arrangements, including costs. Students must manage their financial obligations so as to avoid outside involvement during this assignment and curtail other campus responsibilities so they do not interfere with the supervised teaching assignment. Under state law, student teachers must provide written evidence of a negative TB test for school officials. The test must be taken within three months prior to the starting date for student teaching. Student teachers must also have a criminal background check which involves being fingerprinted. Students must provide proof of a criminal background check before beginning student teaching. Placementarrangements cannot be completed until the background check has been returned.

Student teaching application forms are available in the Student Teaching and Field Experiences Office, 202 McGuffey Hall. Forms must be filled out and returned to the student teaching office by January of the student's junior year.

Instructional Materials Center

The instructional materials center in King Library provides teacher resources and multimedia materials. The collection consists of the Eileen Tway Children's Literature Collection, textbooks, curriculum guides and activity books, and multimedia resources including videos, audio cassettes, filmstrips, slides, models, kits and games, and computer software. Preview equipment for various media is available.

Ohio Writing Project

Ohio Writing Project (OWP) is a program to improve student writing and the teaching of writing in K-12 classrooms. The project brings together outstanding teachers in workshop settings where they share successful approaches to the teaching of writing and study composition theory and pedagogy. Part of the National Writing Project, OWP also emphasizes that writing teachers must themselves write, both to understand how students write and to sharpen their own writing skills.

In addition to teacher preparation, the project offers a testing service to participating school districts that is partially funded by the Ohio Board of Regents. The OWP office is located in the Department of English, 302 Bachelor Hall (513-529-5245).

Advising

Undergraduate academic advising for the School of Education, Health and Society (EHS) is conducted through the department of the student's major. Freshmen work with their FYA (first year adviser) or the department CDA (chief departmental adviser) or undergraduate coordinator prior to acceptance into a major. Once accepted into a major (usually sophomore or junior year) students are assigned faculty advisers in their major.

Career Services

Career services are offered by the Office of Career Services, 241 Hoyt Hall (513-529-3831). Career Services assists students to find employment in teaching and other fields. They can also assist you in establishing credentials, writing resumes, and interviewing.

Department of Teacher Education

For information contact the Department of Teacher Education, 401 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6443).

This department administers undergraduate teacher licensure programs approved by the Ohio Division of Teacher Education and Licensure. Each program, when combined with a baccalaureate degree, makes the candidate eligible for Provisional Ohio teaching licensure in a selected teaching field.

Students who have earned a baccalaureate degree may complete a teacher licensure program as part of a Master of Arts in Teaching degree program in four major cohort areas or may complete a licensure only program in all subject areas. (See the Graduate Bulletin for information about the Master of Arts in Teaching degree program.)

Students enrolled in teacher licensure or educational personnel programs are required to participate in clinical and field experience travel, site development, and supervision and are assessed twice during the licensure program.

Licensure as a classroom teacher in the state of Ohio, and most other states, requires completion of a baccalaureate licensure program, passing a licensure examination (s), and a background check. Students in the Department of Teacher Education must pass the content area of the Praxis II examination before student teaching.

Students seeking licensure in more than one teaching field must meet all requirements for each field, including student teaching. These programs will exceed the minimum credit hours for graduation.

Cohorts

A cohort is defined as a group of students who have been selected by the Department of Teacher Education to experience certain parts of their program together, provided they satisfy the prerequisite retention requirements for the methods courses for their licensure field and for student teaching. A cohort is identified by its general subject or licensure area and by a semester or academic year during which the members start or complete their methods courses. For example, Integrated Mathematics 2010-11, Science 2009-10, Middle Childhood Language Arts and Science Fall 2010, Middle Childhood Math and Science Spring 2012, and Early Childhood Spring 2009 are all separate cohorts.

Selection to a Cohort

Students declare a pre-major in a Teacher Education program at the time of university admission or as soon thereafter as possible. After declaring a pre-major, students must apply for acceptance to a cohort. Selection is limited for each cohort to ensure quality instruction; those applicants with the greatest potential for academic success are selected for each cohort. Admission to Miami University or to the School of Education, Health and Society as a pre-major neither implies nor guarantees selection to a cohort.

A cohort application form may be obtained from the Department of Teacher Education, 401 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6443). Admission to cohorts for pre-majors is based on a student's g.p.a. in all Miami Plan courses. This consists of at least 12 credit hours of Miami Plan courses taken for a grade. Cohort application deadlines vary by program. Contact the department for specific dates.

Applicants must take the Praxis I test and score 173 on reading, 172 on math, and 172 on writing. Applicants with an ACT score of 21 or higher or SAT score (math and verbal) of 980 or above are exempt from taking Praxis I. Other criteria may include an essay and statement of relevant life experience.

You may apply to two cohort programs in order to become eligible for multiple teaching licenses; however, you must be selected to both cohorts. If you are selected to an Adolescent Education science or foreign language cohort, you may also pursue any of the other programs within that same cohort; you must notify your academic adviser of intent to do so.

Transferring from One Cohort to Another

A student in one cohort may not transfer to a different cohort, unless the student applies and is selected to the different cohort. Students who are selected for a cohort must take their cohort classes during that specific cohort year.

Transfer Students

Students transferring from another university or enrolled in another program at Miami may apply for selection into a teacher education licensure cohort following the guidelines in the "Limited Admission to Programs" section of this Bulletin.

Retention

There are retention checkpoints for each cohort at the time of registration for each instructional procedures course and at the time of application to supervised teaching. The department has established retention criteria specific to each major for each retention point, which are available from the department.

Technology Requirement

All teacher education programs will be infusing technology into their classes to assist teacher candidates in their preparation to teach in tomorrow's schools. All students seeking a degree in a teacher education program will be required to have a laptop computer when accepted into their teacher education cohort. Students should consider purchasing an Apple (Mac) laptop computer through the Miami Notebook program. Other laptop brands are acceptable, but not preferred.

Early Childhood Education: Bachelor of Science in Education

Program Requirements

Content/professional studies
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (MPF IIB) (3)
EDL 318E Leadership in Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts
       (MPF IIC) (3)
EDT 181 Physical Science (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
EDT 182 Physical Science (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
EDT 362 The American Political and Economic Experience for Teachers (4)
MTH 115 Mathematics for Early Childhood Teachers (MPF V) (4)
MTH 116 Mathematics for Early Childhood Teachers (4)
NSG/ KNH 232 Health Issues of Children and Youth (2)
Biological Science recommendations for Miami Plan Foundation: BOT 131, 155, 171,
      191; ZOO 113, 114, 121; BOT 115, MBI 115, ZOO 115, BOT 116, MBI 116, or
       ZOO 116.

Early field block
All of these concurrently (includes two weeks of field work):
ART 308E The Child and the Art Experience for Early Childhood (3)
EDP 256E Psychology of the Exceptional Learner (3)
EDT 246E Foundations of Reading, Language, and Literacy (3)
EDT 272E Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3)
MUS 266E Basic Music Skills and Teaching Techniques for Early Childhood (3)
KNH 281E Early Childhood Physical Education (2)

Literacy block
All of these concurrently (includes two weeks of field work):
EDP 495E Inclusion and Adaptations for Gifted and Mild/Moderate Needs:
      Multi-Age (3)
EDT 315E Language Arts and Children's Literature (2)
EDT 346E Reading Instruction in Early Childhood (3)
EDT 442E Phonics and Reading Improvement in Early Childhood (3)
EDT 448E Reading Practicum, Early Childhood (3)
EDT 473E Integrated Curriculum I: Literacy, Play, Arts, and Behavior (3)

Content integration block
All of these concurrently (includes two weeks of field work):
EDP 432 Assessment and Educational Planning for Children Ages 3-8 (3)
EDP 440E Practicum in Integrating Technology into Instruction (1)
EDT 317E Science in Early Childhood (2)
EDT 318E Mathematics in Early Childhood (3)
EDT 417E Teaching Social Studies in Early Childhood (2)
EDT 474E Integrated Curriculum II: Content Areas: Organizing and Planning the Early
      Childhood Learning Environment (3)
KNH 245 Personal Health and Pedagogy for Early Childhood Teachers (3)

Reading Core (courses shown above)
EDT 246E Foundations of Reading, Language, and Literacy (3)
EDT 346E Reading Instruction in Early Childhood (3)
EDT 442E Phonics and Reading Improvement in Early Childhood (3)
EDT 448E Reading Practicum, Early Childhood (3)

Supervised teaching
EDT 419E Supervised Teaching (15)

Middle Childhood Education: Bachelor of Science in Education

Requirements for all Middle Childhood Concentrations

All of these:
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (MPF IIB) (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and
      Educational Contexts (MPF IIC) (3)
EDP 352 Inclusion of Children and Youth with Exceptionalities (3)
EDP 440 Practicum in Integrating Technology into Instruction (1)
EDT 442M Phonics and Reading Improvement in Middle Grades (3)
EDT 448M Reading Practicum in the Middle Grades (3)

One of these:
AMS 205 Introduction to American Studies (3)
ATH 185 Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (3)
ENG 162 Literature and Identity (3)
ENG 248 Asian American Literature (3)
ENG 254 Latino/a Literature in the Americas (3)
FSW/ EDP 481 Adolescent Development in Diverse Families (3)
GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3)
IDS 159 Strength Through Cultural Diversity (3)
KNH 415 Wellness Perspectives for Adolescents (3)
WMS 201 Introduction to Women's Studies (3)

Requirements for Language Arts and Mathematics

All of these:
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (MPF IIB) (3)
EDT 265 Mathematics: History and Technology (3)
EDT/ENG 423 Literature and Other Media for Adolescents (3)
ENG 262M Children's Literature for Middle Childhood (3)
ENG 302 Structure of Modern English (4)
ENG 304 Backgrounds to Composition Theory and Research (3)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
MTH 217 Math for Middle School Teachers (MPFV) (3)
MTH 218 Geometry for Middle School Teachers (3)
MTH 231 Elements of Discrete Mathematics (3)
MTH 407 Patterns and Structures in Mathematics (3)

One of these (see adviser before choosing):
STA 261 Statistics (4)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)

One of these:
ENG 225 Advanced Composition (3)
ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Fiction and Poetry (3)

One of these:
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (MPF IIB, H) (3)
GER 231 Folk and Literary Fairy Tales (MPF IIB, IIIB, H) (3)
RUS 137 Russian Folklore (MPF IIB, IIIB) (3)

One of these (see adviser before choosing):
ENG 301 History of the English Language (4) or
      approved literature elective (see DAR for course list)

These two courses (part of methods block):
EDT 429M Teaching Middle Childhood Mathematics (3)
EDT 436 Methods in Middle Childhood Language Arts (3)

Requirements for Language Arts and Science

All of these:
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (MPF IIB) (3)
ENG 262M Children's Literature for Middle Childhood (3)
ENG 302 Structure of Modern English (4)
ENG 304 Backgrounds to Composition Theory and Research (3)
EDT/ENG 423 Literature and Other Media for Adolescents (3)

One of these:
EDT 415 Inquiring Life Science (3)
PHY 215 Physics by Inquiry (3)

One of these:
ENG 225 Advanced Composition (3)
ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Fiction and Poetry (3)

One of these:
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (MPF IIB, H) (3)
GER 231 Folk and Literary Fairy Tales (MPF IIB, IIIB, H) (3)
RUS 137 Russian Folklore (MPF IIB, IIIB) (3)

One of these:
ENG 301 History of the English Language (4) or
       approved literature elective (see adviser before choosing)

One of these:
CHM 111 Chemistry in Modern Society (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
CHM 137,144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (4, 2)
CHM 141,144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 2)
EDT 181 Physical Science (MPF IVB) (4)
PHY 171,183 College Physics/Physics Lab (3, 1)
PHY 181,183 The Physical World/Physics Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (4, 1)

One of these:
EDT 182 Physical Science (MPF IVB) (4)
GLG 111,115L The Dynamic Earth/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, H, LAB)
        (3,1)
GLG 121,115L Environmental Geology/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, LAB)
        (3,1)
GLG 141,115L Geology of U.S. National Parks/Understanding the Earth
        (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 1)

One of these sequences:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity
        (MPF IVA, LAB) (4), and
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, Molecular Biology
       (MPF IVA, LAB) (4), or
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (MPF IVA, LAB) (4), and
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

One of these:
CHM 491 Chemistry in Societal Issues (3)
EDT 374 The Nature of Science (3)
GLG 207 Water and Society (3)
PHL 205 Science and Culture (3)
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4)
PHY 101 Physics and Society (MPF IVB) (3)
WCP 333B or 334B Seminar in Science, Technology, and the Environment (4,4)
ZOO 400 Contemporary Issues in Zoology (MPC)

From BOT, CHM, GLG, IES, MBI, PHY, and ZOO (not taken previously), select electives to bring total to 24 credit hours in science:
BOT 200-499, CHM 200-499, GLG 200-499, IES 200-499, MBI 200-499, PHY 200-499,
ZOO 200-499, GEO 221, 271, 421, 424, 425, 428, 431, or 432.

These two (part of methods block):
EDT 436 Methods in Middle Childhood Language Arts (3)
EDT 441 Middle Childhood Science (3)

Requirements for Language Arts and Social Studies

All of these:
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (MPF IIB) (3)
EDT 361 Introduction to the Social Sciences for Elementary School Teachers (4)
EDT 362 The American Political and Economic Experience for
                Elementary School Teachers (4)
EDT/ENG 423 Literature and Other Media for Adolescents (3)
ENG 262M Children's Literature for Middle Childhood (3)
ENG 302 Structure of Modern English (4)
ENG 304 Backgrounds to Composition Theory and Research (3)
HST 111, 112 Survey of American History (MPF IIB, IIIA, H) (3,3)

One of these sequences:
HST 121, 122 Western Civilization (MPF IIB, H) (3, 3)
HST 197 World History to 1500 (MPF IIB, IIIB, H) (3) and
       HST 198 World History Since 1500 (MPF IIB, IIIB, H) (3)

One of these (see DAR for additional choices):
GEO 301 Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (4)
GEO 304 Latin American Development (4)
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)

One of these:
ENG 225 Advanced Composition (3)
ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Fiction and Poetry (3)

One of these:
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (MPF IIB, H) (3)
GER 231 Folk and Literary Fairy Tales (MPF IIB, IIIB, H) (3)
RUS 137 Russian Folklore (MPF IIB, IIIB) (3)

One of these:
ENG 301 History of the English Language (4) or
        approved literature elective (see DAR and adviser before choosing)

Two of these (part of the methods block):
EDT 436 Middle Childhood Language Arts (3)
EDT 439 Methods in Middle Childhood Social Studies (3)

Requirements for Mathematics and Science

All of these:
EDT 265 Mathematics: History and Technology (3)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
MTH 217 Mathematics for Middle School Teachers (MPF V) (3)
MTH 218 Geometry for Middle School Teachers (3)
MTH 231 Elements of Discrete Mathematics (3)
MTH 407 Patterns and Structures in Mathematics (MPC) (3)

One of these (see adviser before choosing):
STA 261 Statistics (4)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)

One of these:
EDT 415 Inquiring Life Science (3)
PHY 215 Physics by Inquiry (3)

One of these:
CHM 111 Chemistry in Modern Society (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
CHM 137, 144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (MPF IVB) (4, 2)
CHM 141, 144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 2)
EDT 181 Physical Science (MPF IVB) (4)
PHY 171, 183 College Physics/Physics Lab (3, 1)
PHY 181, 183 The Physical World/Physics Lab (MPF IVB) (4, 1)

One of these:
EDT 182 Physical Science (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
GLG 111, 115L The Dynamic Earth/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, H, LAB) (3, 1)
GLG 121, 115L Environmental Geology/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 1)
GLG 141, 115L Geology of U.S. National Parks/Understanding the Earth
        (MPF IVB, LAB) (3,1)

One of these sequences:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity
        (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) and BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function,
        Cellular, Molecular Biology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) or
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) and ZOO 114 Principles of Biology
        (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

One of these:
CHM 491 Chemistry in Societal Issues (3)
EDT 374 The Nature of Science (3)
GLG 207 Water and Society (3)
PHL 205 Science and Culture (3)
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4)
PHY 101 Physics and Society (MPF IVB) (3)
WCP 333B or 334B Seminar in Science, Technology, and the Environment (4,4)
ZOO 400 Contemporary Issues in Zoology (MPC) (3)

From BOT, CHM, GLG, IES, MBI, PHY, and ZOO (not taken previously), select electives to bring total to 24 credit hours in science:
BOT 200-499, CHM 200-499, GLG 200-499, IES 200-499, MBI 200-499, PHY 200-499,
ZOO 200-499, GEO 121, 221, 271, 421, 424, 425, 428, 431, or 432.

These two (part of methods block):
EDT 429M Teaching Middle Childhood Mathematics (3)
EDT 441 Middle Childhood Science (3)

Requirements for Mathematics and Social Studies

All of these:
EDT 265 The Past, Present, and Future of Mathematics (3)
EDT 361 Introduction to the Social Sciences for Elementary School Teachers (4)
EDT 362 The American Political and Economic Experience for Elementary School
        Teachers (4)
HST 111, 112 Survey of American History (MPF IIB, IIIA, H) (3, 3)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
MTH 217 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers (MPF V) (3)
MTH 218 Geometry for Middle School Teachers (3)
MTH 231 Elements of Discrete Mathematics (3)
MTH 407 Patterns and Structures in Mathematics (MPC) (3)

One of these (see adviser before choosing):
STA 261 Statistics (4)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)

One of these sequences:
HST 121, 122 Western Civilization (MPF IIB, H) (3, 3)
HST 197 World History to 1500 (3) and
        HST 198 World History Since 1500 (MPF IIB, IIIB, H) (3)

One of these (see DAR for additional choices):
GEO 301 Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (4)
GEO 304 Latin American Development (4)
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)

These two (part of methods block):
EDT 429M Teaching Middle Childhood Mathematics (3)
EDT 439 Methods in Middle Childhood Social Studies (3)

Requirements for Science and Social Studies

All of these:
EDT 361 Introduction to the Social Sciences for Elementary School Teachers (4)
EDT 362 The American Political and Economic Experience for
        Elementary School Teachers (4)
HST 111, 112 Survey of American History (MPF IIB, IIIA, H) (3, 3)

One of these:
PHY 215 Physics by Inquiry (3)
EDT 415 Inquiring Life Science (3)

One of these sequences:
HST 121, 122 Western Civilization (MPF IIB, H ) (3,3)
HST 197 World History to 1500 (3) and
        HST 198 World History Since 1500 (MPF IIB, IIIB, H) (3)

One of these (see DAR for additional choices):
GEO 301 Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (4)
GEO 304 Latin American Development (4)
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)

One of these:
CHM 111 Chemistry in Modern Society (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
CHM 137, 144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (MPF IVB) (4, 2)
CHM 141, 144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 2)
EDT 181 Physical Science (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
PHY 171, 183 College Physics/Physics Lab (3, 1)
PHY 181, 183 The Physical World/Physics Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (4, 1)

One of these:
EDT 182 Physical Science (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
GLG 111,115L The Dynamic Earth/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, H, LAB) (3,1)
GLG 121,115L Environmental Geology/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, LAB) (3,1)
GLG 141, 115L Geology of U.S. National Parks/Understanding the Earth
        (MPF IVB, LAB) (3,1)

One of these sequences:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity
       (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) and BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function,
       Cellular, Molecular Biology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (MPF IVA, LAB) (4), and ZOO 114 Principles of Biology
        (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

One of these:
CHM 491 Chemistry in Societal Issues (MPC) (3)
EDT 374 The Nature of Science (3)
GLG 207 Water and Society (3)
PHL 205 Science and Culture (3)
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4)
PHY 101 Physics and Society (MPF IVB) (3)
WCP 333B or 334B Seminar in Science, Technology, and the Environment (4,4)
ZOO 400 Contemporary Issues in Zoology (MPC) (3)

From BOT, CHM, GLG, IES, MBI, PHY, and ZOO (not taken previously), select electives to bring total to 24 credit hours in science:
BOT 200-499, CHM 200-499, GLG 200-499, IES 200-499, MBI 200-499, PHY 200-499,
ZOO 200-499, GEO 121, 221, 271, 421, 424, 425, 428, 431, or 432.

These two (part of methods block):
EDT 439 Methods in Middle Childhood Social Studies
EDT 441 Middle Childhood Science (3)

Adolescent /Young Adult Education

Integrated English Language Arts: Bachelor of Science in Education

All of these:
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (MPF IIB) (3)
COM 417 Methods of Teaching Speech Communication (3)
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (MPF IIB) (3)
EDL 318A Leadership in Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and
        Educational Contexts (MPF IIC) (3)
EDP 352 Inclusion of Children and Youth with Exceptionalities (3)
EDP 440 Practicum in Integrating Technology into Instruction (1)
EDT 190 Introduction to the Teaching Profession (3)
EDT 246A Foundations of Reading, Language and Literacy (3)
EDT 423 Literature and Other Media for Adolescents (3)
ENG 301 History of the English Language (4)
ENG 302 Structure of Modern English (4)
ENG 304 Backgrounds to Composition Theory and Research (3)
FSW/ EDP 481 Adolescent Development in Diverse Families (3)*
* see adviser for other choices

One of these:
JRN 101 Introduction to Journalism (3)
JRN 201 News Writing and Reporting I (3)

One of these:
ENG 225 Advanced Composition (3)
ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Fiction and Poetry (3)

One of these:
ENG 131, 132, or 133 Life and Thought in English Literature (MPF IIB, H) (3, 3, 3)

One of these:
ENG 141, 142, or 143 Life and Thought in American Literature (MPF IIB, H) (3, 3, 3)
ENG 144 Major American Authors (MPF IIB) (3)

One of these*:
CHI 251 Chinese Literature in English Translation (MPF IIIB) (3)
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation (MPF IIIB) (3)
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (MPF IIB, H) (3)
ENG 251 or 252 Life and Thought in European Literature (MPF IIB, H) (3, 3)
ENG 255 or 256 Russian Literature in English Translation (3, 3)
ENG 259 The Modern World Novel (3, 3)
ENG 364 Italian Humanism and Renaissance (3)
FRE 131 Masterpieces of French Culture in Translation (MPF IIB, H) (3)
FRE 350 Topics in French Literature in Translation (3)
ITL 364 Italian Humanism and Renaissance (3)
RUS 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in English Translation (MPF IIB) (3)
RUS 256 Russian Literature in English Translation: From Tolstoy to Nabokov (3)
RUS 257 Russian Literature in English Translation: From Pasternak to the Present (3)
* see adviser for other choices

One of these (see DAR for additional choices):
ENG/BWS 336 African American Writing, 1746-1877 (3)
ENG/BWS 337 African American Writing, 1878-1945 (3)
ENG/BWS 338 African American Writing, 1946-Present (3)
ENG/ BWS 348 Ethnic American Literature (3)

One of these:
ENG 134 Introduction to Shakespeare (MPF IIB) (3)
ENG 221 Shakespeare and Film (3)
ENG 372 or 373 Shakespeare's Principal Plays (3, 3)

One of these:
COM 136 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (MPF IIC) (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication (MPF IIC) (3)
COM 205 American Film as Communication (3)
COM/ HST 389 Great Issues in American History: Rhetoric and Reality (3)

Six semester hours of ENG/COM electives. (See adviser for approved list.)

All of these concurrently, fall semester of cohort year only:
EDP 301A Assessment and Evaluation in Educational Settings (3)
EDT 421A Classroom Management (2)
EDT 427 Adolescent Language Arts I (3)
EDT 346A Reading Methods for Teachers of Adolescents (3)

This one, spring semester of cohort year only:
EDT 428 Adolescent Language Arts II (3)

Supervised teaching semester
EDT 419A Supervised Teaching (15)

Integrated Mathematics: Bachelor of Science in Education

All of these:
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (MPF IIB) (3)
EDL 318A Leadership in Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and
        Educational Contexts (MPF IIC) (3)
EDP 352 Inclusion of Children and Youth with Exceptionalities (3)
EDP 440 Practicum in Integrating Technology into Instruction (1)
EDT 190 Introduction to the Teaching Profession (3)
FSW/ EDP 481 Adolescent Development in Diverse Families (3)*
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 331 Discrete Mathematics (3)
MTH 411 Foundations of Geometry (3)
MTH 421 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4)
MTH 482 Great Theorems of Mathematics (3) (MPC)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3) and STA 401 Probability (3)
* see adviser for other choices

Three hours of 300- and 400-level (300-499) MTH or STA to bring total to at least 22 credit hours (approved by adviser).

All of these concurrently, fall semester of cohort year only:
EDP 301A Assessment and Evaluation in Educational Settings (3)
EDT 421A Classroom Management (2)
EDT 429A Adolescent Mathematics I (3)
EDT 446A Integrating Literacy Across Content Areas (3)
MTH 330 Problems Seminar Praxis Review (1) (optional)

This one, spring semester of cohort year only:
EDT 430 Adolescent Mathematics II (3)

Supervised teaching semester
EDT 419A Supervised Teaching (15)

One of these calculus sequences:
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5) and
        MTH 251 Calculus II (4) and
        MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
MTH 153 Calculus I (4) and
        MTH 251 Calculus II (4) and
        MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
MTH 249 Calculus II (5) and
        MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4) and
        MTH 252 Calculus III (4)

One of these:
EDT 465 Computing Technology Applied to Mathematics (3)
MTH 408 Mathematical Problem Solving with Technology (3)

Integrated Social Studies: Bachelor of Science in Education

All of these:
ATH 155 Cultures in Context (MPF IIC) (4)
ECO 201 Principles of Micro (MPF IIC) (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macro (MPF IIC) (3)
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (MPF IIB) (3)
EDL 318A Leadership in Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and
        Educational Contexts (MPF IIC) (3)
EDP 352 Inclusion of Children and Youth with Exceptionalities (3)
EDP 440 Practicum in Integrating Technology into Instruction (1)
EDT 190 Introduction to the Teaching Profession (3)
FSW/ EDP 481 Adolescent Development in Diverse Families (3)*
GEO 111 World Regional: Patterns and Issues (MPF IIC, IIIB) (3) or
        GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (MPF IIC, IIIB) (3)
POL 241 American Political Systems (MPF IIC, H) (4)
POL 271 World Politics (MPF IIC, IIIB, H) (4)
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (MPF IIC) (4)
* see adviser for other choices

One of these sequences:
HST 121, 122 Western Civilization (MPF IIB, IIIA, H) (3, 3)
HST 197, 198 World History (MPF IIB, IIIB, H) (3, 3)

One of these sequences:
AMS 205, 206 Introduction: Approaches to American Culture (MPF IIB, IIA, H) (3, 3)
HST 111, 112 Survey of American History (MPF IIB, H) (3, 3)

One of these:
SOC 151 Social Relations (MPF IIC) (4)
SOC 201 Social Problems (4)
SOC 202 Social Deviance (4)

This one, fall semester of cohort year only:
EDT 433 Adolescent Social Studies Methods I (3)

All of these concurrently, spring semester only:
EDP 301A Assessment and Evaluation in Educational Settings (3)
EDT 421A Classroom Management (2)
EDT 434 Adolescent Social Studies Methods II (3)
EDT 446A Integrating Literacy Across Content Areas (3)

Supervised teaching semester:
EDT 419 Supervised Teaching (15)

No more than two courses of these may be below 300-level:
Two history courses (3, 3)
Any two-course sequence from ATH, ECO, GEO, POL, or SOC (3, 3)
Non-EuroAmerican courses (6)

Twelve hours above 300- level from ATH, ECO, GEO, HST, POL, or SOC

Foreign Language Education

Complete at least 34 semester hours above 202 level in a foreign language of the licensure field. For Latin, complete 34 semester hours above the 102 level; courses related to Latin in the Department of Classics may be used. Study of the selected language begins at a level appropriate to your competence, determined with a placement examination or with a sequence of study prescribed by your academic adviser. All Spanish, French, and German foreign language education students are required to participate in a study abroad program.

Requirements for All Foreign Language Education Programs

All of these:
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (MPF IIB) (3)
EDL 318A Leadership in Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and
        Educational Contexts (MPF IIC) (3)
EDP 352 Inclusion of Children and Youth with Exceptionalities (3)
EDP 440 Practicum in Integrating Technology into Instruction (1)
EDT 190 Introduction to the Teaching Profession (3)
FSW/ EDP 481 Adolescent Development in Diverse Families (3)*
* see adviser for other choices

This one, fall semester of cohort year only:
EDT 333 Teaching Foreign Language K-12 I (3)

All of these concurrently, spring semester of cohort year only:
EDP 301A Assessment and Evaluation in Educational Settings (3)
EDT 334 Teaching Foreign Language K-12, II (3)
EDT 421A Classroom Management (2)
EDT 446L Reading in the Secondary School (3)

Supervised teaching semester
EDT 419A Supervised Teaching (15)

Chinese: Bachelor of Science in Education

All of these:
CHI 101,102 Elementary Chinese (4,4)
CHI 201,202 Second Year Chinese (3,3)
CHI 301,302 Third Year Chinese (3,3)
CHI 401,402 Fourth Year Chinese (3,3)
ENG 303 Introduction to Linguistics (4)*
* cross-listed as ATH 309/ GER 309/ SPN 303

Two of these (study abroad transfer credit may be used):
ART 186 China, Korea, and Japan (in English) (3)
CHI 251 Traditional Chinese Literature in English (3)
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature in English (3)
CHI 255 Drama in China and Japan in Translation (3)
CHI 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture (in English) (3)

French: Bachelor of Science in Education

Two of these:
FRE 302 Reading Narrative (3)
FRE 303 Reading the Poetic (3)
FRE 310 Texts in Context (3)

One of these (not previously taken):
FRE 302 Reading Narrative (3)
FRE 303 Reading the Poetic (3)
FRE 307L Practical French (3)
FRE 310 Texts in Context (3)

At least one of these:
FRE 404 The French Renaissance (3)
FRE 423 Classical French Theatre of the 17th and 18th Centuries (3)
FRE 442 French Novel and "Conte" of the 17th and 18th Centuries (3)
FRE 451 19th Century Prose Fiction to 1850 (3)
FRE 453 French Poetry from Baudelaire to Valery (3)
FRE 454 The French Realist and Naturalist Novel: Flaubert to Zola (2)
FRE 462 The 20th Century Novel: Contemporary Explorations Beyond Existentialism (3)

All of these:
FRE 301 Reading Theatre (3)
FRE 341 Conversation and Current Events in France (3)
FRE 361 French Pronunciation (3)*
FRE 410 Senior Seminar (MPC) (3)
FRE 411 French Civilization (3)
FRE 415 Advanced Composition (3)

Electives to complete required 34 semester hours:
Recommended: FRE 399W French Conversation (3)
*minimum grade of B required

German: Bachelor of Science in Education

All of these:
GER 301 Advanced German Composition and Conversation (Heidelberg) (3) or
        GER 303 Introductory Business German (3)
GER 311 Introduction to German Literature (MPF IIB, IIIB, H) (3)
GER 312 Introduction to German Literature (3)
GER 471 Applied German Linguistics (3)
Additional course from GER 400-499

One of these:
GER 321 Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe (MPF IIIB, H) (3)
GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture: German-Speaking Europe and the
        USA (MPF IIIB, H) (3)

Choose at least two 400-level German courses, including at least one of the following literature courses:
GER 401 The Age of Goethe (3)
GER 403 German Literature of the 19th Century (3)
GER 404 Seminar in Advanced Business German (3)
GER 410 Children's Literature (3)
GER 421 Survey of German Poetry (3)
GER 422 Major Themes in German Drama (3)
GER 423 Survey of German Prose Fiction (3)
GER 431 German Literature of the 20th Century (3)
GER 432 German Postwar Literature (3)
GER 451 Interpreting German Literature (3)

Electives to complete required 34 semester hours (not previously taken):
GER 203-GER 499
No courses in translation count in this major

Latin: Bachelor of Science in Education

Note: Study abroad is not required in Latin education

All of these:
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (MPF IIIB, H) (3)
CLS 121 Classical Mythology (MPF IIB, H) (3)
LAT 201 Intermediate Latin (3)
LAT 202 Intermediate Latin (3)

Three semester hours from these:
CLS 200-499

Complete required 34 semester hours from these:
LAT 310 Special Topics in Latin Literature (maximum 12)
LAT 410 Latin Seminar (maximum 12)

Spanish: Bachelor of Science in Education

All of these:
SPN 311 Grammar Review and Introduction to Composition (3)
SPN 312 Introduction to Spanish Language and Linguistics (3)
SPN 315 Introduction to Hispanic Literatures (3)
SPN 316 Intermediate Spanish Composition (3)
SPN 342 Advanced Conversational Spanish (3) (usually taken abroad)
SPN 351 Cultural History of Spain I (3)
SPN 352 Cultural History of Spain II (3)
SPN 361 Spanish American Cultural History I (3)
SPN 362 Spanish American Cultural History II (3)
SPN 420/430/440 Selected Topics (3)
SPN 481 Spanish Phonology and Syntax (3)*

Capstone
SPN 490 Capstone course-various topics (3)

Electives - two of these:
SPN electives 451-499 (6)
* see adviser if SPN 481 is not offered

Music Education – see School of Fine Arts

Science Education

Requirements for all Science Education Programs

All of these:
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (MPF IIB) (3)
EDL 318A Leadership in Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts (MPF IIC) (3)
EDP 352 Inclusion of Children and Youth with Exceptionalities (3)
EDP 440 Integrating Technology (1)
EDT 190 Introduction to the Teaching Profession (3)
FSW/ EDP 481 Adolescent Development in Diverse Families (3)*
*see adviser for other choices

This one, fall semester of cohort year only:
EDT 431 Adolescent Science Methods I (3)

All of these concurrently, spring semester of cohort year only:
EDP 301A Assessment and Evaluation in Educational Settings (3)
EDT 432 Adolescent Science Methods II (3)
EDT 421A Classroom Management (2)
EDT 446A Integrating Literacy Across Content Areas (3)

Supervised teaching semester
EDT 419A Supervised Teaching (15)

Earth Science: Bachelor of Science in Education

All of these:
CHM 141, 144 College Chemistry and Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 2)
CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry and Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 2)
GLG 201 Mineralogy (4)
GLG 211 Chemistry of Earth Systems (4)
GLG 244 Oceanography (3)
GLG 301 Sedimentology (4)
PHY 111 Astronomy and Space Physics (MPF IVB, H) (3)
PHY/ AER 118 Introduction to Atmospheric Science (MPF IVB) (3)
PHY 171 College Physics (3) or
        PHY 181 The Physical World (MPF IVB) (4)
PHY 183 Physics Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (1)
STA 261 Statistics (MPF V) (4)

One of these combinations:
GLG 111, 115L The Dynamic Earth/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, H, LAB) (3)
GLG 121, 115L Environmental Geology/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, LAB) (3)
GLG 141, 115L Geology of U.S. National Parks/Understanding the Earth
        (MPF IVB, LAB) (3)

One of these (summers only):
GLG 411 Field Geology in the Tetons (6)
GLG 412 Tropical Ecosystems: Costa Rica (5)
GLG 413 Tropical Marine Ecology (5)
GLG 414 Coastal Ecology of the Bahamas (5)
GLG 415 Coral Reef Ecology (5)
GLG 499 Geology Workshops (various topics) (5)

One of these:
BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and Environment (MPF IVA) (3)
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (MPF IVB) (3)
IES 431 Principles and Applications of Environmental Science (3)
MBI 121 The Microbial World (MPF IVA) (3) and
        MBI 123 Experimenting with Microbes (MPF IVA, LAB) (1)
ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (MPF IVA) (3)

One of these:
ATH 355 Fossil Evidence for Human Evolution (3)
ATH/ ZOO 498 Evolution of Human Behavior (3)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Diversity (4)
GLG 205 Evolution and Earth Systems (3)
ZOO 206 Evolutionary Biology (3)

One of these:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
BOT 191 General Botany (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (regional campus) (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (regional campus) (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

One of these:
EDT 415 Inquiring Life Science (3)
PHY 215 Physics by Inquiry (3)

One of these:
CHM 491 Chemistry in Societal Issues (MPC) (3)
EDT 374 The Nature of Science (3)
GLG 207 Water and Society (3)
PHL 205 Science and Culture (3)
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (3)
WCP 333B or 334B Seminar in Science, Technology, and the Environment (4, 4)
ZOO 400 Contemporary Issues in Zoology (MPC) (3)

Take additional science hours approved by your adviser, to bring total science hours to 65 credit hours.

Earth Science/Chemistry: Bachelor of Science in Education

All of the following:
AER/ PHY 118 Introduction to Atmospheric Science (MPF IVB) (3)
AER 253 Basic Meteorology Lab (1)
CHM 141,144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 2)
CHM 142,145 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (3, 2)
CHM 363,364 Analytical Chemistry/Analytical Chemistry Lab (3,2)
GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environments (MPF IVB) (4)
PHY/AER 111 Astronomy and Space Physics (MPF IVB, H) (3)
PHY 171 College Physics (3) or
        PHY 181 The Physical World (MPF IVB) (4)
PHY 183 The Physics Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (1)
PHY 215 Physics by Inquiry (3)
STA 261 Statistics (MPF V) (4)

One of these combinations:
GLG 111, 115L The Dynamic Earth/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
GLG 121, 115L Environmental Geology/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
GLG 141, 115L Geology of the U.S. National Parks/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)

One of these:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
BOT 191 General Botany (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (regional campus) (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (regional campus) (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

Two of these:
GLG 201 Mineralogy (4)
GLG 211 Chemistry of Earth Systems (4)
GLG 244 Oceanography (3)
GLG 301 Sedimentology and Straitigraphy (4)
GLG 322 Structural Geology (4)
GLG 401 Climate Change (4)
GLG 402 Geo Microbiology (4)
GLG 404 Geodynamics and Tectonic Geomorphology (1-3)
GLG 408 Hydrogeology (4)
GLG 411 Field Geology (6)

One of these:
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4)
CHM 241, 244 Organic Chemistry/Organic Chemistry Lab (3, 2)
CHM 242, 245 Organic Chemistry/Organic Chemistry Lab (3, 2)

One of these:
CHM 491 Chemistry in Societal Issues (MPC) (3)
EDT 374 The Nature of Science (3)
GLG 207 Water and Society (3)
PHL 205 Science and Culture (3)
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (3)
WCP 333B or 334B Seminar in Science, Technology, and the Environment (4)
ZOO 400 Contemporary Issues in Zoology (MPC) (3)

One of these:
ATH 355 Fossil Evidence of Human Evolution (3)
ATH/ ZOO 498 Evolution of Human Behavior (3)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4)
GLG 205 Evolution and Earth Systems (3)
ZOO 206 Evolutionary Biology (3)

Earth Science/Life Science: Bachelor of Science in Education

All of these:
AER/ PHY 118 Introduction to Atmospheric Science (MPF IVB) (3)
AER 253 Basic Meteorology Lab (1)
CHM 141, 144 College Chemistry and Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 2)
CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry and Lab (3, 2)
GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environments (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
PHY 111 Astronomy and Space Physics (MPF IVB, H)
STA 261 Statistics (MPF V) (4)

One of these:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity
        (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) and
        BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and
        Molecular Biology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) or
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) and
        ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) or
BOT 191 General Botany (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) and
        ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

One of these:
BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and Environment (MPF IVA) (3)
IES 431 Principles and Applications of Environmental Science (3)
ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (MPF IVA) (4)
ZOO 351 Environmental Education: Focus on Natural History (4)

One of these:
ATH 355 Fossil Evidence of Human Evolution (3)
ATH/ ZOO 498 Evolution of Human Behavior (3)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Diversity (4)
BOT 205 Evolution and Earth Systems (3)
ZOO 206 Evolutionary Biology (3)

One of these combinations:
GLG 111,115L The Dynamic Earth/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
GLG 121,115L Environmental Geology/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
GLG 141,115L Geology of the U.S. National Parks/Understanding the Earth
        (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)

One of these:
GLG 201 Mineralogy (4)
GLG 205 Evolution and Earth Systems (3)
GLG 211 Chemistry of Earth Systems (4)
GLG 244 Oceanography (3)
GLG 301 Sedimentology (4)
GLG 322 Structural Geology (4)
GLG 401 Climate Change (4)
GLG 402 Geo Microbiology (4)
GLG 404 Geodynamics and Tectonic Geomorphology (1-3)
GLG 408 Hydrogeology (4)

One of these:
BOT 155 Field Botany (MPF IVA, LAB) (3)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Diversity (4) (if not chosen previously)
BOT 205 Dendrology (4)
GLG 411 Field Geology (MPC) (6)
GLG 412 Tropical Ecosystems: Costa Rica (5)
GLG 413 Tropical Marine Ecology (5)
GLG 414 Coastal Ecology of the Bahamas (5)
GLG 415 Coral Reef Ecology (5)
ZOO 333 Field Ecology (2)

One of these:
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4)
        (if not chosen previously)
BOT 425 Fundamentals of Plant Physiology (4)
ZOO 161 Human Physiology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
ZOO 305 Animal Physiology (4)

One of these:
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4)
        (if not chosen previously)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Diversity (4) (if not chosen previously)
BOT/ ZOO 342 Genetics (3)

One of these:
BOT 171 Ecology of North America (MPF IVA) (3)
BOT 401 Plant Ecology (3)
MBI 475 Microbial Ecology (3)
ZOO 204 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)

One of these:
EDT 415 Inquiring Life Science (3)
PHY 215 Physics by Inquiry (3)

One of these:
CHM 491 Chemistry in Societal Issues (3)
EDT 374 The Nature of Science (3)
GLG 207 Water and Society (3)
PHL 205 Science and Culture (3)
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (3)
WCP 333B or 334B Seminar in Science, Technology, and the Environment (4)
ZOO 400 Contemporary Issues in Zoology (MPC) (3)

Earth Science/Physics: Bachelor of Science in Education

All of these:
AER/ PHY 118 Introduction to Atmospheric Science (MPF IVB) (3)
CHM 141,144 College Chemistry and Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 2)
CHM 142,145 College Chemistry and Lab (3, 2)
PHY 111 Astronomy and Space Physics (MPF IVB, H) (3)
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World and Lab (MPF IVB) (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 Physics Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (1, 1)
PHY 215 Physics by Inquiry (3)
PHY 286 Introduction to Computational Physics (3)
PHY 291, 293 Contemporary Physics and Lab (4,2)
PHY 292, 294 Electronic Instrumentation and Lab (3,2)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)

One of these:
GLG 111,115L The Dynamic Earth/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB, H) (4)
GLG 121,115L Environmental Geology/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB) (4)
GLG 141, 115L Geology of U.S. National Parks/Understanding the Earth (MPF IVB) (4)

Two of these:
GLG 201 Mineralogy (4)
GLG 211 Chemistry of Earth Systems (4)
GLG 244 Oceanography (3)
GLG 301 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (4)
GLG 322 Structural Geology (4) (prerequisite is GLG 301)
GLG 411 Field Geology (MPC) (6)
GLG 401 Climate Change (4)
GLG 402 GeoMicrobiology (4)
GLG 408 Hydrogeology (4)

One of these:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity
        (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
BOT 191 General Botany (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

One of these:
CHM 491 Chemistry in Societal Issues (3)
EDT 374 The Nature of Science (3)
GLG 207 Water and Society (3)
PHL 205 Science and Culture (3)
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (3)
WCP 333B or 334B Seminar in Science, Technology, and the Environment (4)
ZOO 400 Contemporary Issues in Zoology (MPC) (3)

One of these:
ATH 355 Fossil Evidence for Human Evolution (3)
ATH/ ZOO 498 Evolution of Human Behavior (3)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity (4)
GLG 205 Evolution and Earth Systems (3)
ZOO 206 Evolutionary Biology (3)

Life Science: Bachelor of Science in Education

One of these:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity
        (MPF IVA, LAB)(4) and
        BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and
                Molecular Biology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) or
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) and
        ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

One of these:
BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and Environment (MPF IVA) (3)
IES 431 Principles and Applications of Environmental Science (3)
ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (MPF IVA) (3)
ZOO 351 Environmental Education: Focus on Natural History (4)

One of these:
ATH 355 Fossil Evidence of Human Evolution (3)
ATH/ ZOO 498 Evolution of Human Behavior (3)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity (4)
GLG 205 Evolution and Earth Systems (3)
ZOO 206 Evolutionary Biology (3)

One of these:
BOT 155 Field Botany (MPF IVA, LAB) (3)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity (if not chosen previously) (4)
BOT 205 Dendrology (4)
BOT 499A Tropical Flora of the Bahamas (MPC) (4)
GLG 499 International Field Geology (5)
ZOO 333 Field Ecology (2)

One of these:
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4)
MBI 201 General Microbiology I (4)
ZOO 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3)

One of these:
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4) (if not chosen previously)
BOT 425 Fundamentals of Plant Physiology (4)
ZOO 161 Human Physiology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
ZOO 305 Animal Physiology (4)

One of these:
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4) (If not chosen previously)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity (4) (if not chosen previously)
BOT/ ZOO 342 Genetics (3)

One of these:
BOT 171 Ecology of North America (MPF IVA) (3)
BOT 401 Plant Ecology (3)
MBI 475 Microbial Ecology: Exploration of the Diverse Roles of Microorganisms
        in Earth's Ecology (3)
ZOO 204 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)

One of these:
EDT 415 Inquiring Life Science (3)
PHY 215 Physics by Inquiry (3)

One of these:
GLG 111, 115L The Dynamic Earth and Lab (MPF IVB, H) (4)
GLG 121, 115L Environmental Geology and Lab (MPF IVB) (4)
GLG 141, 115L Geology of U.S. National Parks and Lab (MPF IVB) (4)

One of these:
CHM 491 Chemistry in Societal Issues (MPC) (3)
EDT 374 The Nature of Science (3)
GLG 207 Water and Society (3)
PHL 205 Science and Culture (3)
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (3)
WCP 333B or 334B Seminar in Science, Technology, and the Environment (4)
ZOO 400 Contemporary Issues in Zoology (MPC) (3)

All of these:
CHM 141, 144 College Chemistry and Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 2)
CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry and Lab (3, 2)
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4)
STA 261 Statistics (MPF V) (4)

Life Science/Physics: Bachelor of Science in Education

One of these:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity
        (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) and
        BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and
               Molecular Biology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) or
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (MPF IVA, LAB) (4) and
        ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

One of these:
BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and Environment (MPF IVA) (3)
IES 431 Principles and Applications of Environmental Science (3)
ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (MPF IVA) 4)
ZOO 351 Environmental Education: Focus on Natural History (4)

One of these:
ATH 355 Fossil Evidence of Human Evolution (3)
ATH/ ZOO 498 Evolution of Human Behavior (3)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity (4)
GLG 205 Evolution and Earth Systems (3)
ZOO 206 Evolutionary Biology (3)

One of these:
BOT 155 Field Botany (MPF IVA, LAB) (3)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Diversity (4) (if not chosen previously)
BOT 205 Dendrology (4)
BOT 499A Tropical Flora of the Bahamas (MPC)(4)
ZOO 333 Field Ecology (2)

One of these:
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4) (if not chosen previously)
BOT 425 Fundamentals of Plant Physiology (4)
ZOO 161 Human Physiology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
ZOO 305 Animal Physiology (4)

One of these:
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4) (if not chosen previously)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Diversity (4) (if not chosen previously)
BOT/ ZOO 342 Genetics (3)

One of these:
BOT 171 Ecology of North America (MPF IVA, LAB) (3)
BOT 401 Plant Ecology (3)
MBI 475 Microbial Ecology (3)
ZOO 204 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)

One of these:
GLG 111, 115L The Dynamic Earth and Lab (MPF IVB, H) (4)
GLG 121, 115L Environmental Geology and Lab (MPF IVB) (4)
GLG 141, 115L Geology of U.S. National Parks and Lab (MPF IVB) (4)

One of these:
CHM 491 Chemistry in Societal Issues (MPC) (3)
EDT 374 The Nature of Science (3)
GLG 207 Water and Society (3)
PHL 205 Science and Culture (3)
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (3)
WCP 333B or 334B Seminar in Science, Technology, and the Environment (4)
ZOO 400 Contemporary Issues in Zoology (MPC) (3)

One of these:
PHY 215 Physics by Inquiry (3)
EDT 415 Inquiring Life Science (3)

All of these:
CHM 141, 144 College Chemistry and Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 2)
CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry and Lab (3, 2)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World (MPF IVB) (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 Physics Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (1, 1)
PHY 291 Contemporary Physics (4)
PHY 292 Electronic Instrumentation (3)
PHY 293 Contemporary Physics Laboratory (2)
PHY 294 Lab in Electronic Instrumentation (2)

Physical Science: Bachelor of Science in Education

One of these:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution,
        Genetics, and Diversity (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular,
        and Molecular Biology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
BOT 191 General Botany (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
MBI 121, 123 The Microbial World/ Experimenting with Microbes (MPF IVA, LAB) (3,1)
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

One of these:
GLG 111, 115L The Dynamic Earth and Lab (MPF IVB, H, LAB) (4)
GLG 121, 115L Environmental Geology and Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)
GLG 141, 115L Geology of U.S. National Parks and Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (4)

One of these:
CHM 491 Chemistry in Societal Issues (MPC) (3)
EDT 374 The Nature of Science (3)
GLG 207 Water and Society (3)
PHL 205 Science and Culture (3)
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (3)
WCP 333B or 334B Seminar in Science, Technology, and the Environment (4, 4)
ZOO 400 Contemporary Issues in Zoology (MPC) (3)

One of these:
CHM 471 Physical Chemistry I (3)
PHY 286 Introduction to Computational Physics (3)

All of these:
CHM 141, 144 College Chemistry and Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 2)
CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry and Lab (3, 2)
CHM 241, 244 Organic Chemistry and Lab (3, 2)
CHM 242, 245 Organic Chemistry and Lab (3, 2)
CHM 363 Analytical Chemistry (3)
CHM 364 Analytical Chemistry Lab (2)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World (MPF IVB) (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 Physics Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (1,1)
PHY 291 Contemporary Physics (4)
PHY 292 Electronic Instrumentation (3)
PHY 293 Contemporary Physics Laboratory (2)
PHY 294 Lab in Electronic Instrumentation (2)

Visual Arts Education – see School of Fine Arts

Reading Endorsement

The reading endorsement is available only at the graduate level. In early childhood and middle childhood the student completes a twelve credit hour reading core which allows the student to teach reading in the age/grade level of licensure. See the Graduate Bulletin for information about the reading endorsement..

Department of Family Studies and Social Work

For information contact the Department of Family Studies and Social Work, 101 McGuffey Hall or call 513-529-2323.

The identified areas of focus of this department are: (a) examining and fostering understanding about the concepts "person in the environment" or "development in context;" (b) fostering increased understanding and the development of strengths in individual development, diverse families, and communities; (c) examining families with adolescents and the particular challenges faced by diverse families during this phase of development; (d) creating knowledge and fostering understanding about how diverse families and communities face stressful circumstances and become resilient in the face of transitions and crises; (e) promoting family life education, as well as evaluation, service, and policy research that enhances the well-being and relationship strength of individuals, families, and communities; and (f) promoting knowledge about and developing prevention, intervention, and social justice strategies for individuals, families, and communities.

Two degree programs in the fields related to families and social work are offered. Each major combines courses in the social sciences, natural sciences, and specialty areas to prepare students for professional careers in a variety of fields including family life education and social work. Opportunities for field work and community service are integral to both degree programs.

The National Council on Family Relations verifies that Miami's undergraduate and graduate programs in Family Studies provide course work meeting all standards and criteria needed for the Provisional Certified Family Life Educator designation.

Family Studies: Bachelor of Science in Family Studies

Note: The Family and Child Studies program requirements and course offerings are currently undergoing substantial revision. The information given below represents the general outline of the program. However, specific details were not available at press time. Please contact the Department of Family Studies and Social Work, 101 McGuffey Hall or call 513-529-2323 for program requirements and additional information.

This program explores the diversity of family systems and their members (e.g. cultural and socioeconomic contexts) across the life span. Courses focus on couple, marital, parental, and other family relationships. Some of the topics addressed are singlehood, decision making in couple relationships, gender roles, communication, marital satisfaction, divorce, remarriage, widowhood, intergenerational relationships, stress, violence, policy, family life education, family support agendas, family poverty, human sexuality education, and family strengths.

A graduate degree is needed to become a licensed counselor or therapist, or go into social service agency management and policy-making.

Field Experience With Families and Children

FSW 494 (Field Experiences with Families and Children) is required for students majoring in family studies. Field experience offers an opportunity for practical experience training in ethical practice and decision making, and career development as part of your education. Experience may include supervision, training, working with children, the elderly, families, or community service (such as domestic violence programs). Your program must be approved by the field experience coordinator prior to your work experience.

Family Life Education Certification

Upon completion of the degree, graduates may be eligible to apply for provisional certification from the National Council on Family Relations. This certification emphasizes academic preparation and experience to enable individuals to design and implement curricula, workshops, and other family life education programs. Family life education areas include: families in society, internal dynamics of families, human growth and development, human sexuality, interpersonal relationships, family resource management, parent education and guidance, family law and public policy, ethics, and family life education methodology. For more information on required course work application procedures, contact the FSW department.

Social Work: Bachelor of Science in Social Work

This major is founded on a liberal arts base. The goal is to prepare students for generalist baccalaureate-level social work practice by integrating the knowledge, values, and skills of the social work profession.

Students are provided a professional foundation in social work values and ethics, diversity, social and economic justice, populations-at-risk, human behavior and the social environment, social welfare policy and services, social work practice, social work research, and field practice. This program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Special Admission Requirements

Prior to admission to this major, you may declare a pre-major. You must apply and be accepted by the social work faculty. You may apply to the program while in the process of completing the list of requirements, however, full admission requires completion of: (1) 30 hours of course work with a 2.50 or above overall g.p.a.; (2) FSW 201 with a grade of C or better and passing ZOO 161, ECO 201, SOC 151, and PSY 111; (3) 20 hours of volunteer work in a social service agency within the past four years; (4) a questionnaire; and (5) two recommendations. Application packets must be filed in the Social Work Program Office by March 1. Admission is limited. You must meet the program requirements as they stand at the time you declare this major. All students, regardless of year of entry, are held to the Social Work Retention Policy (see the Social Work Handbook, available in department office).

Program Requirements

Required core courses

All of these:
FSW 201 Introduction to Social Work (3)
FSW 206 Social Welfare: Impact on Diverse Groups (MPF IIC) (4)
FSW 261 Diverse Family Systems Across the Life Cycle (3)
FSW 295 Research Evaluation in Family Studies and Social Work (4)
FSW 306 Social Work Practice I (4)
FSW 309 Social Welfare Policy II (3)
FSW 312 Human Behavior in the Social Environment (3)
FSW 406 Social Work Practice II (4)
FSW 411 Social Work Senior Practicum (12)
FSW 412 Senior Seminar in Social Work I (2)
FSW 413 Senior Seminar in Social Work II (2)

Required related hours

All of these:
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3) or
        ECO 131 Economic Perspectives on Inequality in America (3)
FSW 281 Child Development in Diverse Families (4) or
        PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (3)
FSW/ GTY 466 Later Life Families (3) or
        PSY 334 Adulthood and Aging (3)
FSW 475 Family Theories (3)
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (MPF IIC) (4) or
        EDP 101 Critical Issues in Psychology of the Learner (MPF IIC) (3)
SOC 151 Social Relations (MPF IIC) (4)
STA 261 Statistics (MPF V) (4) or
        PSY 293 Intro: Psychological Statistics (4) or
        DSC 205 Business Statistics (4)
ZOO 161 Human Physiology and lab (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

One of these:
PSY 241 Personality (3)
PSY 242 Abnormal Psychology (3)
PSY 345 Childhood Psycopathology and Developmental Disabilities (3)

One of these:
SOC 348 American Minority Relations (3)
POL 353 Constitutional Rights and Liberties (3)
PSY 325 Psychology of Prejudice and Minority Experience (3)

Social Work Senior Practicum

FSW 411 (Social Work Senior Practicum) is open only to social work majors and taken for six semester hours both semesters of the senior year. FSW 306 and FSW 406 must be completed prior to beginning FSW 411 Senior Practicum. In addition, concurrent registration for FSW 412 and/or FSW 413 is required with FSW 411 Senior Practicum. The practicum provides an opportunity to apply generalist social work knowledge and skills from the classroom to experiences within a social service agency setting. Students apply generalist social work knowledge and methods to social work with individuals, families, groups, agencies, communities, and/or institutions.

Minors

A minor is a specific program to be taken along with a major to complement your skills and increase your career opportunities. After you have declared a minor at the department office, you will be assigned an adviser from the department. The required semester hours are in parentheses beside each minor.

Child Studies (20 semester hours)

This minor prepares students to work with children from birth to age 8. Courses focus on growth and development, parent-child relationships, and techniques for working with young children. This program is of special interest to those majoring in education, social sciences, speech pathology, or family studies and social work. This minor open to all students includes Thematic Sequence FSW 4 Children in Families.

For program requirements, please contact the Department of Family Studies and Social Work, 101 McGuffey Hall or call 513-529-2323.

Family Relationships (18-20 semester hours)

This minor examines relationships throughout the family life cycle. Courses focus on family diversity, couple relationships, sexuality, parenting, and child development. Those desiring to increase their knowledge about families in order to enhance their career opportunities, including law and medicine, will find this minor of interest.

This minor, open to all students except family studies majors, includes Thematic Sequences FSW 4 Children in Families and FSW 3 Families and Sexuality Across the Life Course.

Program Requirements

All of these:
FSW 261 Diverse Family Systems Across the Life Cycle (MPF IIC) (3)
FSW/ WMS 361 Couple Relationships: Diversity and Change (3)
FSW 365 Family Life Sexuality Education Across Cultures (3)
FSW/ GTY 466 Later Life Families (3)

One from each group:
FSW 281 Child Development in Diverse Families (4) or
        FSW 381 Perspectives in Parenting (3) or
        FSW 481 Adolescent Development in Diverse Families (3)
FSW 475 Family Theories (3) or
        FSW 498 Critical Thinking about the Family (MPC) (4)

Department of Kinesiology and Health

For information on our admissions policies contact the Department of Kinesiology and Health, 106 Phillips Hall (513-529-2700).

The mission of the Department of Kinesiology and Health is to advance the understanding of health, physical activity, and related cultural practices to improve life quality and promote healthful, active living.

The faculty is deeply invested in offering high quality educational and research programs. Phillips Hall has state-of-the-art classrooms and laboratory facilities for enriching the educational and research experience of Miami University students.

The department offers seven undergraduate program majors including athletic training, dietetics, exercise science, health studies, health education, physical education, and sport studies. The department also offers two undergraduate program minors: coaching and nutrition.

Athletic Training: Bachelor of Science in Education

The athletic training major leads to a Bachelor of Science degree and is an accredited curriculum by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). Students who successfully complete this major will be qualified and eligible to take the Board of Certification (BOC) examination.

The mission of the Athletic Training Education Program is to prepare educated, professional athletic trainers through academic curriculum and clinical experiences in which students develop competency and proficiency of entry-level skills for successful completion of the Board of Certification examination and eventual employment in the athletic training profession.

Program Admission Requirements

To enter this major, students must be accepted by the department. Admission is limited due to accreditation enrollment restrictions. Students declare the pre-major and become "affiliate" athletic training students. The pre-major occurs for two semesters during which students will be rotated through clinical experiences in intercollegiate athletics for three, five-week rotations each semester. They will observe and assist the Certified Athletic Trainers and athletic training students in a variety of training facilities with several different teams and athletes. All entry-level athletic training pre-majors are required to complete an application to the program during their second semester. The following criteria must be met to be considered for program admission:

  • documentation of signed Technical Standards in Athletic Training.
  • completion of at least 24 credit hours including a minimum of 12 Miami Plan hours
  • minimum 2.50 g.p.a. in Miami Plan and required courses.
  • complete KNH 182, 183, 183L, and 188/188L. A grade of B or better in KNH 182, 183, and 183L is required.
  • have successful evaluations from the supervising athletic trainers.
  • documentation of annual health history/physical examination (dated no earlier than January 1 of application year).
  • documentation of Hepatitis B vaccine series (or waiver).
  • successful writing sample
  • interview with athletic training program director.
  • completed admission application and supplemental materials. (Applications are available in the Department of Kinesiology and Health on November 1.)

Acceptance to the program is very competitive. Completion of the above does not guarantee admission to the program. Upon acceptance to the program, you will be assigned to clinical sites at Miami and designated affiliate clinical sites and be required to attend your clinical assignments on a daily basis (practices and events; mornings, afternoons, or evenings, and weekends) as per that particular clinical site. Your academic schedule will be the only limiting factor to your clinical assignments. Please note that employment and academic/athletic scholarship requirements will not waive your clinical obligations. Students are responsible for expenses of above as well as transportation to and from all clinical agencies.

Program Requirements

KNH Core (13-14 semester hours)
KNH 102 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3)
KNH 184 Motor Skill Learning and Performance (3)
KNH 184L Motor Skill Learning and Performance Lab (1)
KNH 188 Exercise and Health (MPF IIC, MPT) (3) and
KNH 188L Exercise and Health Lab (MPF IIC) (1) or
        KNH 242 Personal Health (MPF IIC) (3) or
        KNH 245 Personal Health and Pedagogy for Early Childhood Teachers (3)
KNH 276 The Meaning of Leisure (MPF IIC, H) (3) or
        KNH 274 Critical Perspectives on the Body (3)

Athletic Training Major requirements
KNH 182 Introduction to Athletic Training (2)
KNH 183 Foundations of Athletic Training (3)
KNH 183L Foundations of Athletic Training Lab (1)
KNH 188 Exercise and Health (MPF IIC) (3)
KNH 188L Exercise and Health Lab (MPF IIC) (1)
KNH 242 Personal Health (MPF IIC) (3)
KNH 244 Functional Anatomy (3)
KNH 244L Functional Anatomy Lab (1)
KNH 285 Evaluation and Assessment of Athletic Injuries to the
        Head, Neck, and Torso (2)
KNH 285L Evaluation and Assessment of Athletic Injuries to the
        Head, Neck, and Torso Lab (1)
KNH 286A Practicum in Athletic Training I (1)
KNH 286B Practicum in Athletic Training II (1)
KNH 286C Practicum in Athletic Training III (1)
KNH 286D Practicum in Athletic Training IV (1)
KNH 286E Practicum in Athletic Training V (1)
KNH 286F Practicum in Athletic Training VI (1)
KNH 287 Evaluation and Assessment of Athletic Injuries to the Extremities (2)
KNH 287L Evaluation and Assessment of Athletic Injuries to the Extremities Lab (1)
KNH 288 Therapeutic Modalities (3)
KNH 289 Therapeutic Exercise (3)
KNH 381 Biodynamics of Human Performance (3)
KNH 381L Biodynamics of Human Performance Lab (1)
KNH 383 Operational and Administrative Aspects of Athletic Training (2)
KNH 484 Sports Injury Pathology and Emergency Procedures (2)
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (MPF IIC) (4) or
        EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Educational Settings (MPF IIC) (3)
ZOO 161 Principles of Human Physiology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

Elective
KNH 420A Athletic Field Training Experience (1-4)

Dietetics: Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and Health

Dietetics is the area of health science that studies people's nutritional needs and care. The Miami Dietetics program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education (CADE) of the American Dietetic Association (ADA). The major provides a interdisciplinary curriculum with courses in nutrition, food science, exercise, and health with supporting courses in the natural sciences, social sciences, and management. The program also fulfills the didactic portion of the requirements needed to become a registered dietician and a member of the American Dietetic Association (ADA). To become a registered dietician, students must complete an ADA-approved clinical experience following graduation. Dietitians are professionally prepared to perform nutritional assessment and nutritional counseling and education as components of preventive, curative, or restorative health care.

Program Admission Requirements

To enter this major, students must enroll in the Department of Kinesiology and Health (KNH) to take KNH courses as pre-majors. Students are eligible to apply to become a dietetics major after fulfilling the following requirements:

  • enroll as a dietetics pre-major
  • complete 24 credit hours of course work (including twelve hours in Miami Plan Foundation courses)
  • complete KNH 101, 102, and one of the following: KNH 188/188L or KNH 242 or ZOO 161 or MBI 111 (total of 3 courses).
    Note: All of these courses are required for graduation.
  • achieve a g.p.a. of 2.50 or higher in the above coursework.

There is a target enrollment for each major therefore the students with the highest g.p.a. will receive preference in admittance into each major if there are more applicants than positions available.

Upon completion of the above requirements and after all grades have been posted to DARS, students should download the Dietetics Application to change status from pre-major to major from the KNH Blackboard site, complete the application and submit it to the undergraduate secretary, 106-D Phillips Hall. Students will be notified at their Miami e-mail address.

Program Requirements

KNH core (13-14 semester hours)
KNH 102 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3)
KNH 184 Motor Skill Learning and Performance (3)
KNH 184L Motor Skill Learning and Performance Lab (1)
KNH 188 Exercise and Health (MPF IIC, MPT) (3) and
KNH 188L Exercise and Health Lab (MPF IIC) (1) or
        KNH 242 Personal Health (MPF IIC) (3) or
        KNH 245 Personal Health and Pedagogy for Early Childhood Teachers (3)
KNH 276 The Meaning of Leisure (MPF IIC, H) (3) or
        KNH 274 Critical Perspectives on the Body (3)

Major requirements (78-79 hours)

Dietetics. All of these:
KNH 101 Introductory Food Science (3)
KNH 201 Meal Management (3)
KNH 305 Introduction to Food Systems Management (3)
KNH 306 Quantity Food Production (3)
KNH 307 Food Systems Operation (3)
KNH 401 Advanced Food Science (4)
KNH 403 Professional Practices in Dietetics (3)
KNH 405 Advanced Nutrition (3)
KNH 406 Nutrition Therapy (4)
KNH 407 Food and Nutrition for the Aging (3)
KNH 408 Perinatal and Childhood Nutrition (3)
KNH 420G Dietetics Field Experience (2)

Business. All of these:
MGT 291 Organizational Behavior and Theory (3)
MGT 303 Human Resource Management (3)

Science. All of these:
CHM 141, 144 College Chemistry and Laboratory (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 2)
CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry and Laboratory (MPT CHM2) (3, 2)
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (MPT CHM2) (4)
CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (MPT CHM2) (4)
MBI 111 Microorganisms and Human Disease (MPF IVA) (3)
ZOO 161 Human Physiology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

Others. All of these:
EDP 101 Critical Issues in the Psychology of the Learner (MPF IIC) (3) or
        PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (MPF IIC) (4)
ENG 313 Introduction to Technical Writing (3)
STA 261 Statistics (MPF V) (4)

Exercise Science: Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and Health

This major is designed for students who are interested in the scientific aspects of movement and how it affects health and performance. The exercise science major allows you to individualize your degree program. In consultation with your adviser, you can elect up to 25 percent of 128 credit hours required for graduation.

The Department of Kinesiology and Health (KNH) houses new specially-equipped laboratories that support the exercise science major. The exercise physiology laboratory includes treadmills, bicycle ergometers, carbon dioxide and oxygen analyzers, electrocardiographs, and blood analysis hardware. The motor behavior laboratory is equipped with a force platform, electromyography equipment, digital computer-aided video analysis equipment, and an isokinetic dynamometer. This and other state-of-the art equipment used in exercise science courses helps students gain skills in using the equipment and interpreting the data it provides.

Program Admission Requirements

Students must enroll in the Department of Kinesiology and Health (KNH) to take KNH courses as pre-majors. Students are eligible to apply to become a major after fulfilling the following requirements:

  • enroll as an exercise science pre-major
  • complete at least 24 credit hours (including 12 hours in Miami Plan Foundation courses).
  • complete the following courses: KNH 188/188L, ZOO 161, CHM 141/144.
  • achieve a g.p.a. of 2.50 in KNH 188/188L, ZOO 161, CHM 141/144 and all other Miami Plan Foundation coursework.

Upon completion of the above requirements and after all grades have been posted to DARS, students should download the Exercise Science Application from the KNH Blackboard site to change status from pre-major to major, complete the application and submit it to the undergraduate secretary, 106-D Phillips Hall. Students will be notified at their Miami e-mail address.

Program Requirements

KNH core (13-14 semester hours)
KNH 102 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3)
KNH 184 Motor Skill Learning and Performance (3)
KNH 184L Motor Skill Learning and Performance Lab (1)
KNH 188 Exercise and Health (MPF IIC, MPT) (3) and
KNH 188L Exercise and Health Lab (MPF IIC, MPT) (1) or
        KNH 242 Personal Health (MPF IIC) (3) or
        KNH 245 Personal Health and Pedagogy for Early Childhood Teachers (3)
KNH 276 The Meaning of Leisure (MPF IIC, H) (3) or
        KNH 274 Critical Perspectives on the Body (3)

Major requirements
All of these:
CHM 141, 144 College Chemistry and Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (3, 2)
CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry and Lab (MPT CHM2) (3, 2)
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (MPT CHM2) (4)
KNH 188 Exercise and Health (MPF IIC) (3)
KNH 188L Exercise and Health Lab (MPF IIC) (1)
KNH 244 Functional Anatomy (3)
KNH 244L Functional Anatomy Lab (1)
KNH 329 Psychological Perspectives on Health (3) or
        KNH 375 Psychological Perspectives in Sport and Exercise (3)
KNH 381,381L Biodynamics of Human Performance and Lab (3,1)
KNH 382 Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription (4)
KNH 468,468L Physiology and Biophysics of Human Activity and Lab (3,1)
KNH 482 Exercise Management of Chronic Disease (3)
PHY 171,183 College Physics and Lab (MPT CHM2) (5)
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (MPF IIC) (4)
ZOO 161 Human Physiology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

Health Education: Bachelor of Science in Education

For information contact the Department of Kinesiology and Health, 106 Phillips Hall (513-529-2700).

Students pursuing a teacher licensure in health education specialize in child and adolescent health. Successful completion of the degree and licensure requirements will result in an Ohio Teaching Licensure in Health Education, pre-kindergarten to grade 12. Coursework in this major includes health-related content; educational theory in curriculum, instruction, and assessment; pedagogy and technology. Practical field experiences and intern teaching occur during the program in urban, suburban, and rural schools.

Programs in health education lead to teacher licensure for prekindergarten through grade 12.

Program Admission Requirements

To enter this major, students must enroll in the Department of Kinesiology and Health as a pre-major. Students are eligible to apply to become a major after fulfilling the following requirements:

  • enroll as a health education pre-major
  • complete at least 24 credit hours (including 12 hours in Miami Plan Foundation courses).
  • complete the following courses: KNH 102, KNH 188/188L, and KNH 242.
  • achieve a cumulative g.p.a. of 2.50.*

Upon completion of the above requirements and after all grades have been posted to DARS, download the Health Promotion Application to change your status from pre-major to major. The application can be found on the KNH Blackboard site. Complete the form and send it to the undergraduate secretary, 106-D Phillips Hall. Students will be notified at their Miami e-mail address.

*Please Note: A 2.50 g.p.a. (cumulative and in the major) is required for admission and retention in health education.

Admission to Student Teach

Students must have a 2.50 or higher g.p.a. to apply to student teach in health education. The health education faculty will select the semester each major student teaches after review of the applications. Applications to student teach are available from the Office of Student Teaching and Field Experiences. Students must first submit their application to the coordinator of the health education program for review prior to submitting to the Office of Student Teaching and Field Experiences for approval.

Program Requirements

KNH Core (13-14 semester hours)
All of these:
KNH 102 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3)
KNH 184 Motor Skill Learning and Performance (3) and
        KNH 184L Motor Skill Learning and Performance Lab (1)
KNH 188 Exercise and Health (MPF IIC, MPT) (3) and
        KNH 188L Exercise and Health Lab (MPF IIC, MPT) (1) or
        KNH 242 Personal Health (3) or
        KNH 245 Personal Health and Pedagogy for Early Childhood Teachers (3)
KNH 276 The Meaning of Leisure (MPF IIC, H) (3) or
        KNH 274 Critical Perspectives on the Body (3)

Health Studies Core
GTY/ SOC 357 Medical Sociology (3)
KNH 205 Drugs: A Health Perspective (3)
KNH 206 AIDS: Etiology, Prevalence and Prevention (MPF IIC) (3)
KNH 362 Health Education Pedagogy (4)
KNH 462 Health Program Planning and Evaluation (3)
MBI 131 Community Health Perspectives (MPF IVA) (2)
SOC 221 Human Sexuality (3)
ZOO 161 Human Physiology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)
Health-related electives (7)

Developmental Focus: Child and Adolescent Health
Take all of these (health education majors must take KNH 190, 232, 245, & 415 in sequence):
KNH 190 Professional Perspectives in Health and Physical Education (2)
KNH/ NSG 232 Health Issues of Children and Youth (2)
KNH 245 Personal Health and Pedagogy for Early Childhood Teachers (3)
KNH 415 Wellness Perspectives for Adolescents (3)
KNH/ FSW 207 Serving and Supporting Children,Youth, and Families I (MPT, FSW 1) (4)
KNH/ FSW 208 Serving and Supporting Children, Youth, and Families II (MPT, FSW 1) (5)
KNH 408 Perinatal and Childhood Nutrition (3)

Health Education Teacher Licensure Core
All of these:
EDL 204 Sociocultural Foundations in Education (MPF IIB, MPT, EDL 1) (3)
EDL 318 Leadership in Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and
        Educational Contexts (MPF IIIA) (3)
EDP 221 Technology in Education (1)*
EDP 301 Assessment and Evaluation in an Educational Setting
EDP 352 Inclusion for Children and Youth with Exceptionalities (2)
EDP 440 Practicum in Integrating Technology in Instruction (1-2)
KNH 419A Intern Teaching in Health Education (12)
* on-line course

Health Studies: Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and Health

In this program "health" refers to optimal functioning, a process of achieving mental, social, emotional, physical, and spiritual potential. The health studies curriculum is cross-disciplinary in nature, focusing on the sociology, history, pedagogy, psychology, physiology, and biology of health. A student completing this major will be able to facilitate individual health behavior maintenance and/or change, and will also have an understanding of how individual, social, and environmental forces interact in shaping health practices. The intent of this program is to prepare students to be direct providers of health information, informed health advocates, and to be health educators in corporate, classroom, community, work site and/or clinical settings.

Because people's health practices, resources, and opportunities vary across the lifespan, students in the health studies program are required to choose a specialization in one of three modules that emphasize a particular segment of the population. These specialized modules include: (a) child and adolescent health, (b) young and middle adult health, and (c) older adult health. The modules are not setting specific. That is, if students would like to work in corporate, classroom, community, work site, and/or clinical settings, the modules prepare them to work in health education/promotion in any of these settings, with children and adolescents, young and middle-aged adults, or older adults. Students should consult with their adviser on academic plans that will best prepare them to pursue their professional goals.

Program Admission Requirements

To enter this major, students must enroll in the Department of Kinesiology and Health to take courses as pre-majors. Students are eligible to apply to become a major after fulfilling the following requirements:

  • enroll as a health studies pre-major
  • complete at least 24 credit hours (including 12 hours in Miami Plan Foundation courses).
  • complete the following courses: KNH 102, KNH 188/188L, and
    KNH 242.
  • achieve a g.p.a. of 2.50 in the above coursework.

Upon completion of the above requirements and after all grades have been posted to DARS, students should download the Health Studies Application from the KNH Blackboard site to change status from pre-major to major, complete the application and submit it to the undergraduate secretary, 106-D Phillips Hall. Students will be notified at their Miami e-mail address.

Program Requirements

KNH core (13-14 semester hours)
KNH 102 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3)
KNH 184 Motor Skill Learning and Performance (3)
KNH 184L Motor Skill Learning and Performance Lab (1)
KNH 188 Exercise and Health (MPF IIC, MPT) (3) and
        KNH 188L Exercise and Health Lab (MPF IIC, MPT) (1) or
        KNH 242 Personal Health (MPF IIC) (3) or
        KNH 245 Personal Health and Pedagogy for Early Childhood Teachers (3)
KNH 276 The Meaning of Leisure (MPF IIC) (3) or
        KNH 274 Critical Perspectives on the Body (3)

Major requirements (26-31 credits)
All of these:
KNH 188 Exercise and Health (MPF IIC) (3)
KNH 188L Exercise and Health Lab (MPF IIC) (1)
KNH 242 Personal Health (MPF IIC) (3)
KNH 362 Health Education Pedagogy (4)
KNH 462 Health Program Planning and Evaluation (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
ZOO 161 Human Physiology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

Two of these:
KNH 205 Drugs: A Health Perspective (3)
KNH 206 AIDS: Etiology, Prevalence and Prevention (MPF IIC) (3)
KNH 450 Special Problems (1-4)*
*must be approved by adviser

Two of these:
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and
                Educational Contexts (MPF IIC) (3) or
        PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (MPT) (3)
GTY/ SOC 357 Medical Sociology (3)
MBI 131 Community Health Perspectives (MPF IVA) (2)
KNH 329 Psychological Perspectives on Health (3)
SOC 221 Human Sexuality (3)

Health Studies Specialized Modules (10-15 semester hours)
Health education students who elect a second major in health studies must elect from (b) or (c) under specialization modules.

Choose one of these three areas of specialization:
(a) Child and Adolescent Health
At least four of these:
KNH 190 Professional Perspectives in Health and Physical Education (2)
KNH 207 Serving and Supporting Children, Youth and Families I (MPT) (4)
KNH 208 Serving and Supporting Children, Youth and Families II (MPT) (5)
KNH 232 Health Issues of Children and Youth (2)
KNH 245 Personal Health and Pedagogy for Early Childhood Teachers (3)
KNH 247 Pedagogy Foundations in Health and Physical Education (3)
KNH 408 Perinatal and Childhood Nutrition (MPT)(3)
KNH 415 Wellness Perspectives for Adolescents (3)

(b) Young and Middle Adult Health
At least four of these:
FSW 160 Family Relations: Historical and Comparative Analysis (MPF IIC) (3)
FSW 261 Diverse Family Systems Across the Life Cycle (MPF, MPT IIC) (3)
KNH 243 Women's Health Care: Problems and Practices (3)
KNH 385 Contemporary Issues in Men's Health (3)
KNH 471 Sport, Leisure, and Aging (MPT) (4)
PSY 334 Adulthood and Aging (MPT) (3)
REL 360C Homosexual and Lesbian Experience (4)

(c) Older Adult Health
At least four of these:
GTY 154 Aging in American Society (MPF IIC, MPT) (3)
GTY 365 Social Policy and Programs in Gerontology (3)
GTY 464 Sociology of Retirement (MPT) (3)
GTY 468 The Aging Individual in a Changing Society (MPC) (3)
KNH 243 Women's Health Care: Problems and Practices (3)
KNH 385 Contemporary Issues in Men's Health (3)
KNH 407 Food and Nutrition for the Aging (MPT) (3)
KNH 471 Sport, Leisure, and Aging (MPT) (4)
NSG 441 Health and Aging: Concurrent Perspectives and Issues (MPT) (3)

Physical Education: Bachelor of Science in Education

For information contact the Department of Kinesiology and Health, 106 Phillips Hall (513-529-2700).

Upon completion of this course of study and passing a licensure examination, students will be eligible to be licensed to teach physical education only in grades PreK-12. The physical education program requires students to participate in several field experiences throughout their first three years. Student teaching (KNH 419) requires full-day, off-campus placement at area schools for the entire semester. While our content is integrated with health education, students who wish to teach health education must also complete the Health Education Teacher Licensure Program and student teach in health. We strongly encourage students to pursue a double major with health education or a minor in special education.

Program Admission Requirements

To enter this major, students must enroll in the Department of Kinesiology and Health as a pre-major. Students are eligible to apply to become a major after fulfilling the following requirements:

  • enroll as a physical education pre-major
  • complete at least 24 credit hours (including 12 hours in Miami Plan Foundation courses).
  • complete KNH 190, KNH 242, and ZOO 161 with a grade of "C" or higher.
  • achieve an overall g.p.a. of 2.50.
  • complete and successfully pass a background check for any felony convictions.

Upon completion of the above requirements and after all grades have been posted to DARS, download the Physical Education Application to change your status from pre-major to major. The application can be found on the KNH Blackboard site. Complete the application and send it to the undergraduate secretary, 106-D Phillips Hall. Students will be notified at their Miami e-mail address.

Admission to Student Teach

Students must have a 2.50 or higher g.p.a. to apply to student teach in physical education. The physical education faculty will select the semester each major student teaches after review of the applications. Applications to student teach are available from the coordinator of the physical education program.

Program Requirements

KNH Core (13-14 semester hours)
KNH 102 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3)
KNH 184 Motor Skill Learning and Performance (3) and
        KNH 184L Motor Skill Learning and Performance Lab (1)
KNH 188 Exercise and Health (MPF IIC, MPT) (3) or
        KNH 242 Personal Health (MPF IIC) (3) or
        KNH 245 Personal Health and Pedagogy for Early Childhood Teachers (3)
KNH 276 The Meaning of Leisure (MPF IIC, H) (3) or
        KNH 274 Critical Perspectives on the Body (H) (3)

KNH Content for Physical Education (32 semester hours)
KNH 244 Functional Anatomy (3)
KNH 244L Functional Anatomy Lab (1)
KNH 246 Elementary Physical Education (3)
KNH 293 Performance Development and Analysis: Fitness and Conditioning (3)
KNH 294 Performance Development and Analysis: Games and Sports (3)
KNH 297 Children's Exercise and Fitness (3)
KNH 381 Biodynamics of Human Performance (3) and
        KNH 381L Biodynamics of Human Performance Lab (1)
KNH 392 Performance Development and Analysis: Lifetime and Adventure Activities (3)
KNH 393 Performance Development and Analysis: Dance and Gymnastics (3)
KNH 473 Children and Youth in Sport (3)
ZOO 161 Human Physiology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

KNH Professional Content
KNH 190 Professional Perspectives in Health and Physical Education (2)
KNH 247 Pedagogy Foundations in Health and Physical Education (3)
KNH 348 Physical Education Curriculum and Pedagogy (4) and
        concurrently KNH 348F Physical Education Field Experience (3)
KNH 367 Adapted Physical Education (2)
KNH 419P Intern Teaching (12)

Physical Education Teacher Licensure and EAP Divisional Core
EDL 204 Sociocultural Foundations in Education (MPF IIB, MPT, EDL 1) (3)
EDL 318 Leadership in Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts
        (MPF IIC) (3)
EDP 221 Technology in Education (1)*
EDP 222 Technology in Education Lab (2)
EDP 256 Psychology of the Exceptional Learner (3)
EDP 301 Assessment and Evaluation in Educational Settings (3)
EDP 352 Inclusion of Children and Youth with Exceptionalities (2)
Three hours of technology classes
* on-line course

Sport Studies: Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and Health

This major allows students who have a keen interest in sport to study it from psychological, sociological, and historical perspectives. Consistent with the Miami Plan, required courses in sport studies do not just take a descriptive or prescriptive approach. Rather, these courses provide studies with opportunities to think critically about sport and leisure in the broader context of U.S. society and in individual lives. Students can expect to receive a variety of perspectives, some of which will challenge their long-standing beliefs about sport, culture, and the human body.

The sport studies major provides students with a multidisciplinary perspective on sport. Majors are required to take core health-related and physiologically-based coursework. The program serves as an excellent foundation for students who wish to pursue advanced degrees in sport management, American studies, cultural studies, sport psychology, or sport sociology. In addition, the coursework in sport studies can also be used as a foundation for other advanced degrees such as law.

Program Admission Requirements

To enter this major, students must enroll in the Department of Kinesiology and Health as a sport studies pre-major. Students are eligible to apply to become a sport studies major after fulfilling the following requirements:

  • enroll as a sport studies pre-major
  • complete at least 24 credit hours (including 12 hours in Miami Plan Foundation courses).
  • complete the following courses: KNH 188/188L; and KNH 274
    or KNH 276; and PSY 111* or SOC 151 or AMS 101.
  • complete the critical thinking essay administered by the sport studies faculty.
  • achieve a g.p.a. of 2.50 in the best 12 hours of the first 24 hours of the Miami Plan as well as a 2.50 g.p.a. in the pre-major courses listed above.

Note: Transfer credits from other universities for pre-major courses will not be accepted. See your KNH academic adviser to discuss your options.

Upon completion of the above requirements, students are eligible to sit for the critical thinking essay. Register for the essay and then download the Sport Studies Application from the KNH website to change status from pre-major to major, complete the application and submit it at the time of the essay. An unofficial copy of your transcript is required for consideration of transfer credits by the sport studies program. There is a target enrollment for each major and acceptance to the program is very competitive. Completion of the above requirements (required hours and courses, g.p.a., and performance on critical thinking essay) does not guarantee admission to the program. Students will be notified at their Miami e-mail address.

Program Requirements

KNH Core (13-14 semester hours)
KNH 102 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3)
KNH 184 Motor Skill Learning and Performance (3)
KNH 184L Motor Skill Learning and Performance Lab (1)
KNH 188 Exercise and Health (MPF IIC, MPT) (3) and
KNH 188L Exercise and Health Lab (MPF IIC, MPT) (1) or
        KNH 242 Personal Health (MPF IIC) (3) or
        KNH 245 Personal Health and Pedagogy for Early Childhood Teachers (3)
KNH 276 The Meaning of Leisure (MPF IIC) (3) or
        KNH 274 Critical Perspectives on the Body (3)

Sport Studies major courses (39-42 semester hours)
All of these:
KNH 202 Knowledge and Development in Health and Physical Culture (3)
KNH 244 Functional Anatomy (4)
KNH 244L Functional Anatomy Lab (1)
KNH 274 Critical Perspectives on the Body (3)
KNH 276 The Meaning of Leisure (MPF IIC) (3)
KNH 375 Psychological Perspective on Sport and Exercise (3)
KNH 378 Sport and Social Status (3)
KNH 381 Biodynamics of Human Performance (3)
KNH 381L Biodynamics of Human Performance Lab (1)
KNH 473 Children and Youth in Sport (3)
ZOO 161 Principles of Human Physiology (MPF IVA, LAB) (4)

Four of these:
KNH/BWS 279 African Americans in Sport (MPF IIC) (3)
KNH/BWS 292 Dance, Culture, and Contexts (MPF IIB, H) (3)
KNH 453 Seminar: Sport Studies (3)
KNH 471 Sport, Leisure, and Aging (4)
KNH 472 Sport in Schools and Colleges (4)
KNH 474 Sport and Modernization (4)
KNH 475 Women, Gender Relations, and Sport (3)

Minors

A minor is a specific program to be taken along with a major to complement your skills and increase your career opportunities. More information on minors is in the Other Requirements chapter. Required semester hours are in parentheses beside the minor.

Coaching (19 semester hours)

This minor is designed for students interested in formal preparation for coaching. The courses are sequenced to allow students to develop knowledge about the art, science, and pedagogy of coaching. The minor offers students the opportunity to obtain competencies needed to coach at the youth, interscholastic, and intercollegiate levels of sport.

Program Requirements

KNH 184 Motor Skill Learning and Performance (3)
KNH 184L Motor Skill Learning and Performance Lab (1)
KNH 194 Standard First Aid and CPR (2)
KNH 194L Standard First Aid and CPR Lab (1)
KNH 244 Functional Anatomy (3)
KNH 244L Functional Anatomy Lab (1)
KNH 336 Coaching Techniques and Tactics (2)
KNH 337 Foundations and Fitness Training for Coaches (3)
KNH 338 Psychosocial Aspects of Coaching (3)

Fall only:
KNH 336A Coaching Techniques and Tactics: Basketball (2)
KNH 336B Coaching Techniques and Tactics: Baseball (2)
KNH 336I Coaching Techniques and Tactics: Softball (2)
KNH 336G Coaching Techniques and Tactics: Track & Field, Cross Country

Spring only:
KNH 336C Coaching Techniques and Tactics: Soccer (2)
KNH 336E Coaching Techniques and Tactics: Volleyball (2)
KNH 336F Coaching Techniques and Tactics: Football (2)

Nutrition (18 semester hours)

This minor provides an understanding of nutrition and includes specialized courses in child nutrition, nutrition for the aging, an community nutrition. It is open to all students and complements majors in health-related professional and pre-professional programs. A minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required for all courses in the minor. No courses may be taken credit/no-credit.

Program Requirements

KNH 101 Introductory Food Science (3)
KNH 102 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3)
KNH 405 Advanced Nutrition (3)*
KNH 407 Food and Nutrition for the Aging (3)**
KNH 408 Perinatal and Child Nutrition (3)**
KNH 409 Nutrition for Sport and Fitness (3)**
* prerequisite: 6 hrs. of college chemistry
** prerequisite: KNH 102

Special Education

For information contact the Department of Educational Psychology, 201 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6621).

Special Admission and Transfer Requirements

Admission is limited to those who are eligible for admission to teacher preparation programs and have completed 30 semester hours with a 2.50 g.p.a., including EDP 220 Field Experience in Special Education, EDP 256 Psychology of the Exceptional Learner, and EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts, as well as 100 hours of service with persons with exceptionalities.

To enter this teacher licensure program, you must complete an application from the department. See "Admission" earlier in this chapter.

Transfer students may be admitted to a special education program only if they have completed at least 30 semester hours with at least a 2.50 g.p.a. (4.00 scale) for all college work attempted, including courses in educational psychology and exceptional persons, and are eligible for admission to teacher education programs. Otherwise, they will be considered pre-special education majors until these requirements are met.

Candidates will be expected to complete and successfully pass the portfolio review process at established intervals within the program.

Cohorts

A cohort is a group of students in a common year designated to take instructional (methods) courses in a common group of related teaching fields as well as complete their student teaching during the same academic year. Selection is limited for each cohort group to ensure quality instruction.

Selection to a Cohort

Special education majors with licensure: Declare a pre-major in special education or intent to minor in special education at the time of university admission, or soon thereafter. After declaring a pre-major, apply for admission to special education and a cohort group by March 1 of the sophomore year. Applications are available at the department.

Applicants are selected by the special education faculty for each cohort group on the basis of potential for academic and professional success. Cohort selection procedures may be obtained from the department. Applicants are notified of admission to their cohort and major on or before April 15; some applicants may be placed on a waiting list.

Note: Admission to Miami University, the School of Education, Health and Society, or to a pre-major neither implies nor guarantees selection to a cohort group.

Special education minors without licensure and Thematic Sequence: Minors not seeking licensure and students seeking only the Thematic Sequence in special education (EDP 1) can apply any time. Applications are taken until the cohort fills.

The department is committed to admitting transfer students to the special education major and minor; however, there is limited space for transfer students, and they are admitted as cohort space allows.

Special Education: Bachelor of Science in
Education with Licensure (Mild-Moderate Licensure only)

This major leads to the Bachelor of Science in Education with Ohio two-year licensure in Intervention Specialist — Mild-Moderate. Field and/or clinical experience is combined with academic coursework sophomore through senior years. In order to complete the degree requirements in four years, students are encouraged to select the major no later than second semester of the first year.

Program Requirements

Professional core
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (MPF IIB) (3)
EDL 318 Leadership in Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and
        Educational Contexts (MPF IIC) (3)
EDP 256 Psychology of Learners with Exceptionalities (3)*
EDP 494 Assessment, Evaluation, and Educational Planning for Learners
        with Exceptionalities (3)
* Prerequisite for EDP 256 is EDP 201.

Reading core:
EDT 246A Foundations of Reading, Language, and Literacy (3)
EDT 346M Reading Instruction for Middle Grades (3)
EDT 442M Phonics and Reading Improvement for Middle Grades (3)
EDP 471 Literacy Training Seminar - Clinical
EDP 472 Literacy Training Seminar - Practical

Intervention specialist core
EDP 220 Field Experiences in Special Education (1)**
EDP 444 Teaching Social and Affective Skills to Children and Youth
        with Exceptionalities (2)***
EDP 478 Consultation and Collaboration in Special Education (3)***
EDP 496 Behavioral Interventions: Theory, Principles and Techniques (3)***
SPA 223 Theories of Language Development (3)
** Pre- or Co-requisite is EDP 256
*** Prerequisite is EDP 256

Mild/moderate intervention specialist
Intervention specialist core and all of these:
EDP 454 Adapting Math Instruction for Learners With Special Needs (3)
EDP 459 Practicum in Special Education: Mild/Moderate Disabilities (3)
EDP 491 Individuals With Mild-Moderate Disabilities: Social, Educational, and
        Legal Issues (3)
EDP 495 Inclusion and Adaptations for Mild-Moderate Needs: Multi-age (3)
MTH 115 Mathematics for Teachers of Grades P-6 (4)
MTH 116 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers (4)

Minor

A minor is a specific program to be taken along with a major to complement your skills and increase your career opportunities. More information on minors is in the Other Requirements chapter.

Special Education With Licensure

Open to any major, this minor can usually be completed within a four-year program. It includes Thematic Sequence EDP 1. Application for this minor and thematic sequence are accepted in the EDP office each year until enrollment limits are reached.

Program Requirements

Take this course first:
EDP 256 Psychology of Learners with Exceptionalities (3)

Then take these:
EDP 272 Disability Studies (3) or
                EDP 471 Literacy Training Seminar-Clinical*
EDP 478 Consultation and Collaboration in Special Education (3)
EDP 491 Individuals With Mild-Moderate Disabilities: Social, Educational and
                Legal Issues (3)
EDP 494 Assessment and Evaluation of Exceptional Learners (3)
EDP 496 Behavioral Interventions: Theory, Principles, and Practice (3)
FSW 381 Perspectives in Parenting (3) or
        EDP 478 Building Partnerships with Families of Persons with Exceptionalities (3)
SPA 223 Language Development (3)
* Recommended for education and speech pathology majors only

Thematic Sequence:
EDP 1 Developmental, Social, and Educational Patterns in Individuals With Exceptionalities

All of these:
EDP 256 Psychology of the Learner With Exceptionalities (3)
EDP 491 Individuals With Mild-Moderate Disabilities: Social, Educational and
                Legal Issues (3)*
EDP 272 Disability Studies (3)* or
                EDP 478 Consultation and Collaboration in Special Education (3)*
* Prerequisite is EDP 256


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