About Miami
Academics
Admission
Living at Miami
University Offices
General Bulletin 2008-2010

The School of Engineering and Applied Science

General Information

The School of Engineering and Applied Science's mission is to serve society by providing high quality undergraduate and graduate education in the fields of computing, engineering, and nursing. We are committed to creating an environment for teaching, learning, and scholarship that is intellectually stimulating, interactive, innovative and in which our faculty, staff, and students reach their full potential. Our guiding principle is to provide professional education integrated with Miami University's traditional strength in liberal education.

Everyone in the School of Engineering and Applied Science values:

  • Effective student learning and student success
  • An intellectually stimulating and challenging environment
  • Faculty growth and learning as teachers and scholars
  • Diversity of staff, faculty, and student body
  • Respect for the environment

We are committed to an environment that fosters:

  • Innovation and creativity
  • Ethical behavior
  • Respect for others and teamwork
  • International and global opportunities and perspectives
  • Fact-based, collegial decision-making
  • Safety in all our professional endeavors

The School of Engineering and Applied Science offers the following Bachelor's degrees and majors:

Majors:
Bachelor of Science in:
      Computer Science
      Nursing
      Paper Science and Engineering
      Systems Analysis

Bachelor of Science in Applied Science with major in
      Engineering Technology (completion program for
      associate's degree holders)

Bachelor of Science in Engineering with major in:
      Chemical Engineering
      Computer Engineering
      Electrical Engineering
      Engineering Management
      General Engineering
      Manufacturing Engineering
      Mechanical Engineering

Minors:
Chemical Engineering
Computer Engineering
Computer Science
Electrical Engineering
Manufacturing Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Paper Engineering

Associate degree programs at the regional campuses:

Computer and Information Technology
Computer Technology
Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology
Mechanical Engineering Technology
Nursing
Technical Study (interdisciplinary)

Certificate Programs at the regional campuses:

Computer-Aided Drafting/Computer-Aided Manufacturing
Computer Hardware Technology
School Nurse Licensure (for BSN graduates)

First-Year Course Selection for Undecided Students

The School of Engineering and Applied Science has developed the following first-year course pattern for students who have not decided on a major and who want to progress satisfactorily in engineering and applied science majors while maintaining maximum flexibility in considering other science/math-based programs. Faculty advisers are available at summer orientation to help you select courses within this pattern. You will be assigned a faculty adviser to help you with course and career selection while you remain an undecided major. Once you've selected a major, a faculty adviser in that area will be assigned to you.

If you have already chosen a major in engineering and applied science, please refer to the program description later in this section for recommended first-year course selections.

If you are undecided about your major, but considering a major in engineering and applied science (except nursing), select courses within the following pattern with the advice of a faculty adviser:

First semester (16-19 semester hours)
EAS 101 Computing, Engineering, and Society (1)
ENG 111 College Composition (MPF I) (3)
MTH 151 or 153 Calculus I (4-5) or MTH 249 Calculus II (MPF V) (5)*
PHY 181, 183 The Physical World and Laboratory (MPF IVB) (4, 1) or
       CHM 141, 144 College Chemistry and Laboratory (MPF IVB) (3, 2) or biological science course (MPF IVA) (3)
Miami Plan elective (IIA, IIB, IIIA, or IIIB) (3) or
       CSA 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3)

Second semester (16-19 semester hours)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4) or MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
PHY 182, 184 The Physical World and Laboratory (MPF IVB) (4, 1) or
       CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry and Laboratory (3, 2) or
      Miami Plan electives (IIA, IIB, IIIA, or IIIB not taken above) (6)
* Typically, students start with MTH 151. Depending on results of the math placement exam, ACT/SAT scores, and high school background, however, you may start with MTH 104, 123, 153, or 249. Students who take a prerequisite course to MTH 151 (104 or 123) will usually not hinder their academic progress.

Choosing Liberal Education Electives

All programs in the School have liberal education electives in the humanities, fine arts, social science, United States and world cultures, and Thematic Sequence components of the Miami Plan for Liberal Education. You are encouraged to seek advice from a faculty adviser in choosing electives that are consistent with your interests and educational goals.

Study Abroad

Students are encouraged to consider spending a summer term, semester, or year studying abroad. This experience offers a valuable opportunity to enrich students' perspectives and understanding and to help understand the needs of clients in computing, engineering, and nursing in our increasingly global society. Students considering study abroad need to meet with their advisor and plan their curriculum as early as possible.

Transfer Students

Transfer students from two-year colleges who have received associate of science or associate of arts degrees with emphasis in science, engineering, mathematics, or computing, or have received associate of science in nursing degrees will find their credits adaptable to one of the bachelor's degree programs in the School. Consult a faculty adviser for further information on the applicability of your credits.

Honorary and Professional Organizations

Through honorary and professional organizations, you can further develop leadership skills, interact with professionals in your field, and engage in educational activities which have significance beyond the campus.

Organizations sponsored through the School of Engineering and Applied Science include American Institute of Chemical Engineers, American Society for Mechanical Engineers, Association for Computing Machinery, Association for Women in Computing, National Society of Black Engineers, National Society of Professional Engineers, Paper Industry Management Association, Society of Automotive Engineers, Society of Manufacturing Engineers, The Society of Women Engineers, Tau Beta Pi, and the Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry.

Advisory Councils

Engineering and Applied Science Advisory Council is composed of outstanding leaders in business, industry, and the professions. Council meets on campus twice a year with faculty and students, helping to ensure that the School's programs continually improve and meet society's changing needs.

The School and our departments are also advised by student advisory councils to continually improve our programs.

Co-op and Intern Opportunities

Internships and co-ops provide an opportunity for students in engineering and applied science to gain work experience in an area related to their majors.

Both programs offer employers an opportunity to preview prospective employees and for students to preview prospective employers. Contact the Office of Career Services for more information.

Placement and Graduate Studies

Most graduates enter professions directly upon graduation. Each year many employers visit campus specifically to recruit engineering and applied science seniors. Placement rates for graduates of the School have consistently remained high; current placement information can be obtained from the office of the dean. Placement services are available to all Miami students through the Office of Career Services.

Our graduates are well prepared to pursue graduate education. Assistantships are frequently available in the graduate programs at other universities in addition to Miami University. Many graduates, who enter their profession directly, pursue graduate degrees on a part-time basis with the financial support of their full-time employer.

Basic Requirements: Bachelor of Science Programs

Students derive their strength from a curriculum that is a unique combination of professional education in the major discipline and the Miami Plan for Liberal Education. With help of the Engineering and Applied Science Advisory Council representatives from business, industry, health care agencies, and other areas, the School has articulated broad outcome characteristics desired of our graduates.

School of Engineering and Applied Science graduates should be able to:

  • Define and solve problems
  • Make ethical choices and act responsibility
  • Critically evaluate information
  • Work effectively in a team
  • Exercise initiative
  • Function in a leadership role
  • Recognize broad societal contexts and interests
  • Serve clients and society with sensitivity and accountability
  • Interact effectively with diverse cultures
  • Adapt to change
  • Recognize the value of lifelong learning
  • Write effectively
  • Speak and listen effectively
  • Understand and apply mathematics and science
  • Understand and apply the concepts of continuous quality
    improvement
  • Pursue further formal education

You must attain a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. for required departmental courses in your major. Specific course requirements for each of the School's majors are listed in this chapter.

Major Programs: School of Engineering and Applied Science

Chemical Engineering: Bachelor of Science in Engineering

For information contact the Department of Paper and Chemical Engineering, 64 Engineering Building (513-529-0760).

Note: Changes in courses and curriculum requirements were being considered as this Bulletin goes to press. For more information contact the Department of Paper and Chemical Engineering (see above).

Chemical engineering encompasses the analysis, design, and synthesis of products and processes in a variety of areas, such as chemical and petrochemical processes, pharmaceuticals, environmental processes, biotechnology/bioengineering, and pulp and paper processes. The field of chemical engineering requires the ability to understand and apply math and science, to research concepts and apply modeling methods, and to simulate and test working conditions and their impact on the designed systems.

The chemical engineer of the 21st century must be able to think critically in broader contexts because problems in contemporary society are not only technical but also social and economic in nature. This program provides the student with a broad chemical engineering education enhanced by courses in manufacturing engineering, chemistry and biochemistry, economics, humanities, social science, world and U.S. cultures, and liberal arts.

Graduates have the opportunity to work in a diverse spectrum of professional fields. These vary from research to design, from development to manufacturing, and from technical sales to production. Chemical engineers work in manufacturing-related areas as well as in non-technical sectors of the economy such as business, law, and management. Graduates will also be prepared to continue their education at the graduate level.

Within the chemical engineering curriculum, student choose among concentrations including biochemical engineering, environmental engineering, and paper science and engineering. A partial list of industries that employ chemical engineers includes biotechnology and biomedicine, electronics, food processing, environmental protection, paper, petroleum refining, and synthetic fibers.

Merit scholarships provided by the industry-supported Miami University Paper Science and Engineering Foundation enable those students with good academic records who choose the paper science and engineering option within chemical engineering to receive partial tuition to as much as full in-state tuition costs (tuition, fees, room and board). Out-of-state students may be eligible for an additional award of $2,000 per year.

Educational Objectives

The educational objectives of the program are:

  • The graduate will have and apply the technical knowledge, skills, and expertise required of a process engineer to achieve practical solutions to problems in the chemical industry or for a company allied to the chemical industry. The graduate will serve the needs of the biochemical, environmental, and paper industries.
  • The graduate will have organizational leadership and general communication skills needed by professionals at the entry-level and beyond.
  • The graduate will have the key personal attributes desirable in an engineer and use these attributes to learn and develop.
  • The graduate will have life-long learning skills, which will allow successful adaptation to the changing environment and evolving technologies throughout the professional career.
  • The major will have sound grounding in engineering, sciences, and liberal education, which will facilitate successful pursuit of graduate studies in engineering or other professional degrees, such as business, law, or medicine

Credit/No-Credit Policy

All required engineering, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and English courses should be taken for a grade.

Grade Requirements

You must earn a grade of C- or better in the following courses: CHM 141, CHM 142, MTH 151, MTH 245, MTH 251, PCE 204, PCE 313, PCE 314, PCE 341, and PCE 403.

Transfer Credit Policy

To obtain transfer credit for any 300- or 400-level paper and chemical engineering course, you must first receive written departmental approval before enrolling in that course at another college or university. Transfer credit may be obtained for only one engineering course in the series PCE 204, PCE 313, PCE 314, PCE 403, and PCE 414. Contact the department if transferring into this program.

Program Reguirements: Chemical Engineering

English (9 hours)
ENG 111 College Composition (MPF I) (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3)
ENG 313 Technical Writing (3)

Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Science (12 hours)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
Miami Plan Fine Arts elective (MPF IIC) (3)
Miami Plan Foundation II elective (MPF IIA or B or C) (3)
Miami Plan Humanities elective (MPF IIB) (3)

US and World Cultures (6 hours)
Miami Plan US Cultures elective (MPF IIIA) (3)
Miami Plan World Cultures elective (MPF IIIB) (3)

Natural Science (38 hours)
CHM 141,142,144,145 College Chemistry w/Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (10)
CHM 244,251,252 Organic Chemistry w/Lab (8)
CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (4)
CHM 351 Physical Chemistry (3)
PHY 181,182,183,184 The Physical World w/Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (10)
Miami Plan Biological Science elective (MPF IVA) (3)

Mathematics and Statistics (16 hours)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5)
MTH 251, 252 Calculus II & III (8)
MTH 245 Differential Equations for Engineers (3)

Thematic Sequence (0-9 hours)
This sequence may be fulfilled by Chemistry of Life Processes courses
( CHM 142, CHM 251, CHM 244, and CHM 332)

Capstone (3 hours)
PCE 471, 472 Engineering Design I & II (2,2) to meet the capstone requirement

Required Chemical Engineering/Paper Science and Engineeering Courses (40 hours)
MME/ PCE 313 Fluid Mechanics (3)
MME/ PCE 314 Thermodynamics (3)
MME/ PCE 341 Engineeering Economics (3)
MME/ PCE 403 Heat Transfer (3)
PCE 204 Mass and Energy Balances (3)
PCE 219 Statics and Mechanics of Materials (3)
PCE 311 Unit Operations Lab (2)
PCE 312 Unit Operations Lab (2)
PCE 412 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
PCE 414 Mass Transfer (3)
PCE 415 Chemical Kinetics and Reactor Design (3)
PCE 471,472 Senior Design (Capstone) (3)
PCE 473 Chemical Process Design (3)
PCE 482 Process Control (3)

Required Engineering Courses (4 hours)
EAS 101 Computing, Engineering, and Society (1)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)

Technical electives (12-13 hours)
Select one of the following concentrations:
Paper Science and Engineering
PCE 201 Principles of Paper Science and Engineering (3)
PCE 202 Pulp and Paper Physics (3)
PCE 301 Pulp and Paper Chemistry (3)
PCE 404 Paper Making (3)
PCE 411 Advanced Paper Making (3)

Environmental Engineering
MME 223 Engineering Materials (3)
PCE 405 Industrial Environmental Control (3)
PCE 441 Pollution Prevention (3)
PCE 442 Air Pollution Control (3)

Biochemical Engineering
CHM 433 Biochemistry (3)
MME 223 Engineering Materials (3)
PCE 416 Biochemical Engineering (3)
PCE 417 Biomedical Engineering (3)

Computer Engineering: Bachelor of Science in Engineering

For information contact the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 260 Engineering Building (513-529-0741).

Computer engineering combines elements of electrical engineering and computer science to design and operate devices and/or systems incorporating computers as components. It seeks to interface appropriate software to digital hardware in creating computer-centric products and services. The field of computer engineering requires the ability to understand and apply mathematics, science, and software development techniques; to research concepts and apply modeling method, to simulate and test working conditions and their impact on the designed systems, and to synthesize different elements in order to obtain the optimum design of a specific product.

The increasing sophistication in products and systems requires industry to hire academically qualified computer engineers who can apply modern techniques and methods of engineering. Examples include computer-aided design, computer assisted engineering, computer-vision embedded systems, intelligent control and power systems, and robotics.

The computer engineer of the 21st century must be able to think critically in broader contexts because problems in contemporary society are not only technical but also social and economic in nature. This program provides the student with a broad computer engineering education enhanced by courses in manufacturing engineering, electrical engineering, computer science, mechanical engineeering, economics, humanities, social science, world and United States cultures, and liberal arts.

Graduates have the opportunity to work in a diverse spectrum of professional fields. These vary from research to design, development to manufacturing, and technical sales to production. Many computer engineers work in manufacturing-related areas such as in the analysis and design of varied products as well as in non-technical sectors of the economy such as business, law, and management. Graduates will also be prepared to continue their education at the graduate level.

The computer engineering curriculum provides students with a sound foundation in basic science, mathematics, humanities, communication skills and technical subjects. Design project and teamwork, as well as ethics and professional responsibilities of an engineer are emphasized throughout the curriculum.

Educational Objectives

The educational objectives of the Miami University Computer Engineering Program are to produce graduates who:

  • have a successful career based on computer engineering education.
  • understand the fundamentals of mathematics, physical science, and engineering science and are able to apply this knowledge to the solution of engineering problems.
  • can function effectively in a multidisciplinary team environment.
  • are skillful in oral and written communication.
  • continue to develop professionally through a life-long learning process.
  • exhibit a high standard of ethical conduct and citizenship.
  • have a global view and inspiration.

To achieve these objectives, we expect our graduates to attain the following program outcomes upon their graduation:

  • an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and
    engineering.
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs.
  • an ability to function in multi-disciplinary environments.
  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  • an ability to communicate effectively.
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global societal context.
  • a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long
    learning.
  • a knowledge of contemporary issues.
  • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Credit/No Credit Policy

All required engineering and computing courses and prerequisite mathematics and statistics courses must be taken for a grade.

Program Requirements: Computer Engineering
(128-137 semester hours)

English (9 hours)
ENG 111 College Composition (MPF I) (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3)
ENG 313 Introduction to Technical Writing (3)

Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Science (12 hours)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
Miami Plan IIA Fine Arts Elective (3)
Miami Plan IIB Humanities Elective (3)
Miami Plan Foundation II Elective (3)

United States and World Cultures (6 hours)
Miami Plan IIIA United States Cultures Elective (3)
Miami Plan IIIB World Cultures Elective (3)

Natural Science (18 hours)
PHY 181,182,183,184 The Physical World/Lab (MPF IVB) (10)
CHM 141,144 College Chemistry/Lab (MPF IVB) (5)
Miami Plan Biological Science Elective (MPF IVA) (3)

Mathematics and Statistics (18-19 hours)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
MTH 231 Elements of Discrete Math (3)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
MTH 245 Differential Equations for Engineers (3)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4) or
        STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)

Thematic Sequence (9 hours)
Liberal Education sequence outside your major focused around a theme (9)

Capstone (4 hours)
MME/ ECE 448 Senior Design Project (2)
MME/ ECE 449 Senior Design Project (2)

Required Computer Science Courses (18 hours)
CSA 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3)
CSA 271 Object-Oriented Programming (3)
CSA 274 Data Abstraction and Data Structures (3)
CSA 283 Data Communications and Networks (3)
CSA 381 Operating Systems (3)
CSA/ ECE 278 Computer Architecture (3)

Required Engineering Courses (30 hours)
EAS 101 Computing, Engineering, and Society (1)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
ECE 205 Electric Circuit Analysis I (3)
ECE 287 Digital Systems Design (4)
ECE 304 Electronics (3)
ECE 305 Electric Circuit Analysis II (3)
ECE 306 Signals and Systems (3)
ECE 387 Embedded Systems Design (4)
ECE 425 Digital Signal Processing (3)
MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3) or
        PCE 219 Statics and Mechanics of Materials (3)

Computer Engineering Electives (choose 12-13 hours)
Software Engineering Electives:
CSA 348 Applied Software Engineering (3)
CSA 383 Client Server Systems (3)
CSA 385 Database Systems (3)
CSA 386 Introduction to Computer Grapics (3)
CSA 464 Algorithims (3)
CSA 472 Software Engineeering (3)
CSA 486 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3)

Control and Instrumentation Electives:
ECE 428/528 Real-Time Signal Processing (3)
ECE/ MME 436 Control of Dynamic Systems (3)
MME 311 Dynamic Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
MME 437 Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Systems (3)

Communication Electives:
ECE 325 Applied Electromagnetics (3)
ECE 414/514 Introduction to VLSI Circuit and System Design (3)
ECE 453 Communication Systems (3)
ECE 461/561 Network Modeling and Performance Analysis (3)
ECE 470 Special Topics (3)

Computer Science: Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

For information contact the Department of Computer Science and Systems Analysis, 205 Benton Hall (513-529-0340).

This program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (CAC/ABET).

The computer science major provides graduates with a thorough understanding of the key principles and practices of computing, and the mathematical and scientific principles that underpin them. The program emphasizes software design and development. Topics of study include programming languages, algorithms, computer architecture, operating systems, and applications of computer science such as database systems, artificial intelligence, and computer networks. Students will also learn the relevant aspects of mathematics, including calculus, discrete mathematics, and probability and statistics. Graduates of the program can apply these principles and practices to a variety of problems, and also reflect on the social, professional, and ethical considerations related to computing. Students learn to work in teams and to communicate effectively.

In addition to an in-depth technical knowledge, a computer science major builds on a broad education and sense of how computer science is used and how it affects people and society. Consequently, the curriculum integrates course work in computer science, mathematics, probability and statistics, oral and written communication, the liberal arts, and science.

Upon entering this program, you should have an interest in analytical thinking and problem solving, an aptitude for mathematics, and an interest in working with computers and technology.

Departmental Honors

If you excel in your studies, you may qualify for the University Honors Program or the program for Honors in Computer Science and Systems Analysis. As a senior in these programs you will have the opportunity to work closely with the faculty on research projects of interest.

Credit/No-Credit Policy

All required computer science courses and prerequisite mathematics and statistics courses must be taken for a grade.

Graduate Study

The department offers a combined bachelor's/master's degree program that allows students to complete these two degrees in an accelerated manner. Students are eligible to apply for this program in their junior year. Please contact the CSA department office for more information.

Other graduate programs offered by the department are a master's degree in computer science and a certificate in software development. Additional information is available in the Graduate Bulletin or from the CSA department office.

Program Requirements: Computer Science (128 semester hours minimum)

English (9 hours)
ENG 111,112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3,3)
ENG 313 Introduction to Technical Writing (3)

Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Science (12 hours)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (MPF IIB)*
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3) or
        ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
Miami Plan Fine Arts elective (MPF IIA) (3)
Additional elective (MPF IIA, B, or C)
* COM 231 can be substituted for COM 135, however COM 231 does not fulfill the Miami Plan humanities requirement.

US and World Cultures (6 hours)
United States cultures elective (MPF IIIA) (3)
World cultures elective (MPF IIIB) (3)

Natural Science (12-14 hours)
Choose one of these sequences:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115, 116 (MPF IVA) (8) and a Natural Science (MPF IVB) (4)
CHM 141,144 and 142 ,145 (10 hours, 5 of which are MPF IVB) (MPF IVB) and
       a Biological Science
PHY 181,183 and 182,184 (MPF IVB) (10) and a Biological Science (MPF IVA) (3)

Mathematics and Statistics (16-18 hours)
All of these:
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
MTH 231 Elements of Discrete Mathematics (3)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)

Note: Computer science majors are required to take at least 30 hours of mathematics, statistics, and natural science courses. If you select math and science options above that result in fewer than 30 hours, the remaining hours may consist of any 200-level or higher MTH, STA, PHY, CHM, BOT, MBI, or ZOO courses.

Thematic sequence (9 hours)
The MTH 2 Thematic Sequence Basic Mathematical Tools for Science is fulfilled by CSA requirements ( MTH 151, MTH 231, and STA 301).

Computer Science Requirements (38 hours)
CSA 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3)
CSA 271 Object-Oriented Programming (3)
CSA 274 Data Abstraction and Data Structures (3)
CSA 278 Computer Architecture (3)
CSA 283 Data Communication and Networks (3)
CSA 348 Applied Software Engineering (3)
CSA 361 Societal & Ethical Issues in Computing (3)
CSA 381 Operating Systems (3)
CSA 385 Database Systems (3)
CSA 448 Senior Design Project I (MPC) (2)*
CSA 449 Senior Design Project II (MPC) (2)*
CSA 464 Algorithms (3)
CSA 486 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3)
EAS 101 Computing, Engineering, and Society (1)
* IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum may be substituted for CSA 448/449,
but only with prior approval from the CSA Department.

CSA Electives (15 hours)
CSA 372 Stochastic Modeling (3)
CSA 383 Client Server Systems (3)
CSA 386 Introduction to Computer Graphics (3)
CSA 465 Comparative Programming Languages (3)
CSA 467 Computer and Network Security (3)
CSA 470 Special Topics (3)
CSA 471 Simulation (3)
CSA 473 Automata, Formal Languages, and Computability (3)
CSA 474 Compiler Design (3)
CSA 480 Special Problems (Honors Program) (1-4)
CSA 485 Advanced Database Systems (3)
CSA 487 Game Design and Implementation (3)
CSA 491 Undergraduate Research (3)
ECE 287 Digital Systems Design (4)

Electrical Engineering: Bachelor of Science in Engineering

For information contact the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 260 Engineering Building (513-529-0741).

Electrical engineering is the process of applying electric and magnetic phenomena in an innovative way to create useful products and services. Progress in electrical engineering led society from the electricity age through communication and computer ages to the current information age. The profession encompasses a broad range of concentration areas such as electronic circuits, instrumentation and control, integrated circuits, electromagnetics, power and energy, communications, computers and networks, and signal processing. Products and services like electricity, broadcasting, computers, cellular phones, navigation equipment, and the internet affect and influence every aspect of modern civilization. The widespread utilization of electrical means of measurement and control, computers, and communications has resulted in the need for electrical engineers in all types of industries. Excellent employment opportunities exist for well-prepared graduates.

Miami's electrical engineering curriculum provides students with a sound foundation in basic science, mathematics, the humanities, communication skills, and technical subjects. Design project management and teamwork as well as ethics and professionalism are emphasized throughout the curriculum.

Educational Objectives

The educational objectives of the Miami University Electrical Engineering Program are to produce graduates who:

  • have a successful career based on electrical engineering education.
  • understand the fundamentals of mathematics, physical science, and engineering science and are able to apply this knowledge to the solution of engineering problems.
  • can function effectively in a multidisciplinary team environment.
  • are skillful in oral and written communication.
  • continue to develop professionally through a life-long learning process.
  • exhibit a high standard of ethical conduct and citizenship.
  • have a global view and inspiration.

To achieve these objectives, we expect our graduates to attain the following program outcomes upon their graduation:

  • an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and
    engineering.
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs.
  • an ability to function in multi-disciplinary environments.
  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  • an ability to communicate effectively.
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global societal context.
  • a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long
    learning.
  • a knowledge of contemporary issues.
  • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Credit/No Credit Policy

All required engineering and computing courses and prerequisite mathematics and statistics courses must be taken for a grade.

Program Requirements: Electrical Engineering (128-138 semester hours)

English (9 hours)
ENG 111 College Composition (MPF I) (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3)
ENG 313 Technical Writing (3)

Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Science (12 hours)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
Miami Plan IIA Fine Arts Elective (3)
Miami Plan IIB Humanities Elective (3)
Miami Plan Foundation II Elective (3)

United States and World Cultures (6 hours)
Miami Plan IIIA United States Cultures Elective (3)
Miami Plan IIIB World Cultures Elective (3)

Natural Science (18 hours)
CHM 141,144 College Chemistry/Lab (MPF IVB) (5)
PHY 181,182,183,184 The Physical World/Lab (MPF IVB) (10)
Miami Plan Biological Science Elective (3)

Mathematics and Statistics (18-19 hours)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
MTH 231 Discrete Math (3)
MTH 245 Differential Equations for Engineers (3)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4) or
        STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)

Thematic Sequence (9 hours)
Liberal Education sequence outside your major focused around a theme (9)

Capstone (4 hours)
MME/ ECE 448 Senior Design Project (2)
MME/ ECE 449 Senior Design Project (2)
Required Computer Science and Systems Analysis Courses (12 hours)
CSA 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3)
CSA 271 Object-Oriented Programming (3)
CSA 274 Data Abstraction and Data Structures (3)
CSA/ ECE 278 Computer Architecture (3)

Required Engineering Courses (39 hours)
EAS 101 Computing, Engineering, and Society (1)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
ECE 205 Electric Circuit Analysis I (3)
ECE 287 Digital Systems Design (4)
ECE 304 Electronics (3)
ECE 305 Electric Circuit Analysis II (3)
ECE 306 Signals and Systems (3)
ECE 325 Applied Electromagnetics (3)
ECE 387 Embedded Systems Design (4)
ECE 425 Digital Signal Processing (3)
ECE/ MME 436 Control of Dynamic Systems (3)
ECE 453 Communications Systems (3)
MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)

Electrical Engineering Electives (choose 9-10 hours)
Computer Engineering Electives:
CSA 283 Data Communication and Networks (3)
CSA 381 Operating Systems (3)
CSA 386 Introduction to Computer Graphics (3)
CSA 486 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3)
ECE 414/514 Introduction to VLSI and System Design (3)
ECE 461/561 Network Modeling and Performance Analysis (3)

Control and Instrumentation Electives:
MME 311 Dynamic Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
MME 437 Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Systems (3)

Electrical Engineering Electives:
ECE 428/528 Real Time Signal Processing (3)
ECE 470 Special Topics (3)
MME 311 Dynamic Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)

Engineering Management: Bachelor of Science in Applied Science

For information contact the Chair, SEAS Engineering Management Committee, 56 Engineering Building (513-529-0712).

Many of today's global businesses require graduates with interdisciplinary skills in engineering and business. This program provides you with an interdisciplinary education in engineering, business and management, science, mathematics, and liberal education. You choose an engineering specialty (manufacturing engineering, environmental engineering, or paper science and engineering) and a Thematic Sequence of courses in another discipline, as well as a variety of choices within the foundation courses of the Miami Plan. This broad educational experience will help you address technological problems in their large organizational and societal contexts. You can gain valuable work experience by participating in our co-op or internship programs.

As a graduate you will be qualified to fill technical positions that require interaction with business aspects of operations, purchasing, personnel, accounting, and marketing. Examples of such positions include technical sales, line supervision, purchasing, environmental protection, and quality control.

Educational Objectives

The following are the educational objectives of the Miami University Engineering Management program with Manufacturing Engineering, Environmental Engineering, or Paper Science Technical Specialties. These are achieved and measured several years after the students graduate.

Engineering Management with Manufacturing Engineering Technical Specialty

The program develops students who:

  • solve problems by applying the knowledge required for engineering managers.
  • solve engineering problems by applying mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering science.
  • solve engineering problems by applying engineering design.
  • verbally communicate effectively information related to their work.
  • write effectively information related to their work.
  • serve as an effective team member.
  • serve as an effective team leader.
  • serve on multidisciplinary teams.
  • integrate and utilize fundamental knowledge in computing, business, and liberal arts in their job.
  • know and practice ethical responsibility as outlined by the Engineering Code of Ethics.
  • engage in continuous learning and intellectual growth.
Engineering Management with Environmental Engineering or Paper Science Technical Specialties

Graduates from these specialties will:

  • have and apply the technical knowledge, skills, and expertise required of a process engineer to achieve practical solutions to problems in the chemical industry or for company allied to the chemical industry. The graduate will serve the needs of the biochemical, environmental, and paper industries.
  • have organizational leadership and general communication skills needed by professionals at the entry-level and beyond.
  • have the key personal attributes desirable in an engineer and use these attributes to learn and develop.
  • have life-long learning skills, which will allow successful adaptation to the changing environment and evolving technologies throughout the professional career.

The major will have sound grounding in engineering, sciences, and liberal education, which will facilitate successful pursuit of graduate studies in engineering or other professional degrees, such as business, law, or medicine.

Credit/No Credit Policy

All required engineering, chemistry, physics, mathematics, statistics, computer science, and English courses must be taken for a grade.

Program Requirements: Engineering Management

The number of hours needed to graduate depends on your choice of technical specialty, Thematic Sequence, and mathematical preparation. Course requirements for the Miami Plan are listed in that chapter. Many of the courses taken to fulfill the Miami Plan can be used to fill other requirements of this program.

English (9 hours)
ENG 111 College Composition (MPF I) (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3)
ENG 313 Technical Writing (3)

Mathematics/Statistics/Computer Science (16 hours)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
MTH 245 Differential Equations for Engineers (3)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)

Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Science (12 hours)
COM 135 Public Expression/Critical Inquiry (MPF IIB) (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
Miami Plan IIA Fine Arts Elective (3)

United States and World Cultures (6 hours)
Miami Plan IIIA United States Cultures Elective (3)
Miami Plan IIIB World Cultures Elective (3)

Natural Science (18-22 hours)
CHM 141,144 College Chemistry/Lab (MPF IVB) (5)
PHY 181,182 The Physical World (MPF IVB) (4,4)
PHY 183,184 The Physical World Lab (for MFG) (MPF IVB, LAB) (1,1) or
CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry II (for PCE & ENV) (5)
Miami Plan Biological Science Elective (MPF IVA) (3-4)

Thematic Sequence (9 hours)
Liberal Education sequence outside your major focused around a theme (9)

Remaining Business Core Courses (18 hours)
ACC 221 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3)
MGT 291 Organizational Behavior and Theory (3)
MGT 302 Operations Management (3)
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3)

Management Track - select one:

Materials Management
MGT 432 Purchasing and Materials Management (3)
MKT 431 Logistics Management (3)

Operations Management
MGT 451 Operations Planning and Scheduling (3)
MGT 453 Productivity Improvement (3)

Purchasing /Procurement Track
MGT 432 Purchasing and Materials Management (3)
MIS 303 Enterprise Systems (3)

Human Resources
MGT 303 Human Resources Management (3)
MGT 405 Labor Relations and Conflict Management (3)

Entrepreneurship
ESP 467 Entrepreneurship: New Ventures (3)
ESP 481 Technology, Products, and Ventures (3)

Note: ECO 201, 202 under Social Science are also Business Core

Manufacturing Engineering Technical Specialty (51 hours)
CSA 372 Analysis of Stochastic Systems (3)
EAS 101 Computing Engineering and Society (1)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
ECE 205 Electric Circuit Analysis (3)
EGM/ MGT 311 Project Management (3)
MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
MME 213 Computational Methods in Engineering (3)
MME 223 Engineering Materials (3)
MME 231 Manufacturing Processes (3)
MME/ ECE 303 Computer-Aided Experimentation (3)
MME 312 Mechanics of Materials (3)
MME/ PCE 314 Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
MME 334 Quality Planning and Control (3)
MME/ PCE 341 Engineering Economics (3)
MME 434 Advanced Manufacturing (3)
MME 437 Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Systems (3)
MME/ ECE 448,449 Senior Design Project I, II (2, 2)

Paper Science and Engineering Technical Specialty (47 hours):
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4)
EAS 101 Computing Engineering and Society (1)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
MME/ PCE 313 Fluid Mechanics (3)
MME/ PCE 314 Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
MME/ PCE 341 Engineering Economics (3)
PCE 201 Principles of Paper Science and Engineering (3)
PCE 202 Pulp and Paper Physics (3)
PCE 204 Materials and Energy Balance (3)
PCE 219 Statics and Mechanics of Materials (3) or
        MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
PCE 301 Pulp and Paper Chemistry (3)
PCE 311 Unit Operations Laboratory I (2)
PCE 404 Papermaking (3)
PCE 411 Advanced Papermaking (3)
PCE 471 Engineering Design I (1)
PCE 472 Engineering Design II (2)
PCE 482 Process Control (3)
PCE 490 Special Topics (1)

Choose one:
PCE 405 Industrial Environmental Control (3)
PCE 490 Special Topics (3)

Environmental Engineering Technical Specialty (43 hours):
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4)
EAS 101 Computing Engineering and Society (1)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
MME/ PCE 313 Fluid Mechanics (3)
MME/ PCE 314 Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
MME/ PCE 341 Engineering Economics (3)
PCE 204 Materials and Energy Balance (3)
PCE 219 Statics and Mechanics of Materials (3) or
        MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
PCE 244 Introduction to Environmental Engineering (3)
PCE 311 Unit Operations Laboratory I (2)
PCE 405 Industrial Environmental Control (3)
PCE 415 Chemical Kinetics and Reactor Design (3)
PCE 441 Pollution Prevention in Environmental Management (3)
PCE 442 Air Pollution Control (3)
PCE 471 Engineering Design I (1)
PCE 472 Engineering Design II (2)

Engineering Technology: Bachelor of Science in Applied Science

For information contact the Department of Engineering Technology, 301 Mosler Hall, Hamilton campus (513-785-3132).

This department offers associate degree programs in electrical and computer engineering technology and mechanical engineering technology and baccalaureate completion degree programs. All programs are offered on the regional campuses in Hamilton and Middletown. The baccalaureate programs are for students who have earned an associate degree. The associate degree programs are described in the Hamilton and Middletown chapter.

Educational Objectives

We consider program educational objectives as the general characteristics our graduates demonstrate to the workplace, graduate school, the military, or their endeavors after they leave Miami. We typically measure these characteristics initially at graduation by asking graduates if they feel that they have achieved these characteristics and then periodically thereafter through employer surveys, letters from graduates, advisory council, graduate school accomplishments, and surveys of graduates who have been out for a while. These characteristics should become most evident within the first few years after graduation.

The Engineering Technology Department's graduates are able to:

  • apply math and physics principles to the solution of engineering technical problems.
  • use applied skills to identify, evaluate, and solve complex technical problems.
  • use engineering computer software to facilitate engineering problem solving.
  • function effectively in team-oriented activities.
  • demonstrate the knowledge of expected standards of ethical and professional conduct.
  • verbally communicate ideas.
  • prepare well-written technical reports

In addition, our graduates will have the necessary fundamentals to pursue life-long learning.

Program-Specific Educational Objectives

Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology (A.A.S.)
The ECET program produces graduates who:

  • analyze digital and analog electrical and electronic circuits, identify problem areas, and maintain these systems.
  • function effectively as electrical and computer engineering technicians in state and regional industries

Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology (B.S. Completion Program)
The EMET program produces graduates who:

  • possess the ability to apply theoretical knowledge to solve engineering technology problems associated with instrumentation and control systems.
  • are knowledgable of modern applications in process control systems.

Mechanical Engineering Technology (A.A.S. & B.S.)
The MET program produces graduates who:

  • are able to analyze and design complex mechanical components and systems.
  • are able to set up experimental testing procedures and selectively utilize data to reinforce engineering concepts.
  • have a basic understanding of modern manufacturing methods used to facilitate the production of consumer products.
  • are able to effectively and efficiently manage engineering projects (B.S. only).

Credit/No Credit Policy

All required engineering technology courses and prerequisite mathematics and statistics courses should be taken for a grade.

Baccalaureate Degree Program: Electro-Mechanical Concentration

The Engineering Technology baccalaureate degree (Electro-Mechanical concentration) is a completion program for graduates of associate degree programs in electrical/electronics, mechanical, electro-mechanical or similar engineering technology programs. The objective of this program is to allow students who possess an associate degree in these areas to complete the bachelor degree in approximately the equivalent of two years of full-time work (64-70 semester hours).

Graduates are engineering technologists prepared to fill industrial positions in areas directly related to scientific programming, product design, process control, testing, manufacturing, sales, and service. Typical engineering technologist's duties may include working in teams involved with product analysis/design, instrumentation and control, CAD/CAM product design, laboratory testing services, product sales and service, product application, and the design of systems that require a hardware/software interface.

Program Requirements: Engineering Technology
(Electro-Mechanical concentration) (129-134 semester hours)

Between 65 and 70 hours of course work beyond the 64 hours earned for an associate's degree are required to complete this program. Total hours for graduation depend on your selection of a Miami Plan Thematic Sequence, your mathematical preparation, and the prerequisite courses taken as part of your associate degree. Prerequisites, completed in the associate degree, are described below.

Curriculum Summary (beyond associate's degree)

General education and nontechnical courses (18 hours minimum)
Liberal education electives
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3)
Miami Plan electives from fine arts, humanities and social science (MPF IIA, IIB, IIC) or
       United States and world cultures (MPF IIIA, IIIB) (9)*
Thematic Sequence (6-9)
* Must include one course that presents a historical perspective (H). Select MP Foundation courses to also satisfy requirements for associate degree and baccalaureate completion program.

Mathematics and science (16-17 hours)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
CHM 141 College Chemistry (MPF IVB) (3) and
        CHM 144 College Chemistry Lab (2)
STA 368 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (4) or
        STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
Miami Plan biological science elective (MPF IVA) (3)

Engineering technology requirements (31 hours minimum)
This electro-mechanical concentration of courses provides depth in mechanical, electrical, and software integration necessary for automation.
ENT 296 Programmable Logic (3)
ENT 301 Dynamics (3)
ENT 310 Fluid Mechanics (3)
ENT 311 Process Control Interface Design (3)
ENT 316 Project Management (3)
ENT 401 Computerized Instrumentation (3)
ENT 407 Topics in Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology (3)
ENT 412 Industrial Applications of Neural Networks and Fuzzy Logic (3)
ENT 418 Electro-Mechanical Control Systems (3)
ENT 497 Senior Design Project (2)
ENT 498 Senior Design Project (2)

Prerequisites (64 semester hours)
Thirty-two hours of non-technical and basic program support courses and 32 hours of technical course work must be included in your associate degree.

Nontechnical and basic support courses, including equivalent of these (32 hours):
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (MPF IIB) (3) or
        COM 136 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (MPF IIC) (3)
CSA 153 Introduction to C/C++ Programming (3) or
        CSA 163 Introduction to Computer Concepts and Programming (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
ENG 111 College Composition (MPF I) (3)
ENG 215 Technical Writing (3) or
        ENG 313 Introduction to Technical Writing (3)
MTH 125 Pre-Calculus (5)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
PHY 171, 172 College Physics (3, 3) or
        PHY 181, 182 The Physical World (MPF IVB) (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 The Physical World Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (1, 1)
Miami Plan electives from fine arts, humanities and social science (MPF IIA, IIB, IIC) or United States and world cultures (MPF IIIA, IIIB) (at least 3 hours)*
* Must include one course that presents a historical perspective (H). Select MP Foundation courses to also satisfy requirements for associate degree and baccalaureate completion program.

Technical course work, including equivalent of these (32 hours):
ENT 135 Computer-Aided Drafting (3)
ENT 151 Engineering Materials (3)
ENT 192 Circuit Analysis I (3)
ENT 196 Electronics (3)
ENT 271 Mechanics I: Statics (3)
ENT 272 Strength of Materials (3)
ENT 291 Industrial Electronics (3)

Electrical, mechanical, or electro-mechanical associate degree programs at Miami University, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, Columbus State Community College, North Central State College, James A. Rhodes State College, Shawnee State University, Sinclair Community College, Southern State College, or Washington State Community College will normally meet these requirements. Students who do not meet these prerequisites will be admitted, but will be required to complete the prerequisites as needed.

Baccalaureate Degree Program: Mechanical Engineering Technology Concentration

The Engineering Technology baccalaureate degree (Mechanical Engineering Technology concentration) is a completion program for graduates of associate degree programs in mechanical engineering technology. The objective of this program is to allow students who possess an associate degree in this area to complete the bachelor degree in approximately the equivalent of two years of full-time work (64-70 semester hours).

Mechanical Engineering Technology focuses on applications engineering and the analysis of the mechanical components of mechanisms, machines, products, and systems. The program requires a thorough understanding of applied mathematics and the engineering sciences. Students will develop the essential skills needed to apply experimental and empirical techniques to the study of systems and the solution of problems. This knowledge is used to research concepts, apply modeling methods, simulate and test operating conditions and their impact on the designed systems, and synthesize different elements to obtain an optimum design of a specific product.

Industry is in need of qualified mechanical engineering technologists who are able to apply such tools as computer-aided design (CAD), finite element modeling and analysis, and the concepts of advanced mechanical design to the creation of sophisticated machines and systems.

The mechanical engineering technology concentration provides depth of study in mechanical and manufacturing engineering technology built on a solid foundation of mathematics, physics, and computer science. The program also provides breadth through required studies in economics, humanities, social science, United States and world cultures, and liberal arts.

Graduates will find employment opportunities in a diverse spectrum of professional fields. Many mechanical engineering technologists work on team projects within manufacturing-related areas such as testing, analysis, design, and the development of products. Graduates may also continue their education at graduate engineering technology/engineering levels.

Program Requirements: Mechanical Engineering Technology (129-135 semester hours)

English (9 hours)
ENG 111 College Composition (MPF I) (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3)
ENG 215 Technical Writing (3)

Mathematics/Statistics/Computer Science (20 hours)
CSA 163 Introduction to Computer Concepts and Programming (3)
MTH 125 Pre-Calculus (5)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3) or
        STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)

Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Science (12 hours)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (MPF IIB) (3) or
        COM 136 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (MPF IIC) (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
Miami Plan II Fine Arts, Humanities, or Social Science Elective (3)
Miami Plan IIA Fine Arts Elective (3)

United States and World Cultures (6 hours)
Miami Plan IIIA United States Cultures Elective (3)
Miami Plan IIIB World Cultures Elective (3)

Natural Science (16 hours)
CHM 141,144 College Chemistry/Lab (MPF IVB) (3,2)
PHY 181,182 The Physical World (MPF IVB) (4,4) or
PHY 171, 172 College Physics (3, 3)
PHY 183,184 The Physical World Lab (MPF IVB, LAB) (1,1)
Miami Plan IVA Biological Science Elective (3)

Thematic Sequence (3-9 hours)
Credits required to complete the Thematic Sequence will vary depending on courses completed in the foundation.

Capstone Experience (4 hours)
ENT 497 Senior Design Project (2)
ENT 498 Senior Design Project (2)

Mechanical Engineering Technology Required Courses (56 hours)
ENT 135 Computer-Aided Drafting (3)
ENT 137 Introduction to Engineering Technology (1)
ENT 151 Engineering Materials (3)
ENT 152 Computer-Aided Manufacturing I (3)
ENT 192 Circuit Analysis I (3)
ENT 235 Computer-Aided Design (3)
ENT 252 Computer-Aided Manufacturing II (3)
ENT 271 Mechanics I: Statics (3)
ENT 272 Mechanics II: Strength of Materials (3)
ENT 278 Mechanics III: Analysis of Machine Components (3)
ENT 301 Dynamics (3)
ENT 310 Fluid Mechanics (3)
ENT 312 Thermodynamics and Heat Power (3)
ENT 314 Mechanisms for Mechanical Design (3)
ENT 315 Introduction to Finite Element Analysis (3)
ENT 316 Project Management (3)
ENT 333 Computational Methods for Engineering Technology (4)
ENT 415 Heat Transfer with Applications (3)
ENT 416 Topics in Mechanical Vibrations (3)

Technical electives (3 hours)
ENT 300 or 400-level course

General Engineering: Bachelor of Science in Engineering

For information, contact the Office of the Dean, 106 Benton Hall (513-529-0700).

The general engineering major provides students with a rigorous introduction to the fundamentals of the engineering discipline within the context of Miami's strong liberal arts tradition. Problem-solving skills and comprehension of the role of engineering in modern society are emphasized. The general engineering major enables students to appreciate and comprehend engineering practice in the context of fields typically outside of engineering and is designed for students interested in pursuing non-technical career paths.

The international component is designed to provide the student with significant international experience. This component will enable the student to learn about other cultures, experience the basic elements of global communication, engage in interdisciplinary activities and examine their liberal and professional education in global settings. The outcome of such an experience will prepare the student to work effectively in the global society.

Students are able to select among many different electives, minors, and paths to different disciplines. There are a minimum of nine free electives that students can combine with a thematic sequence to have a minor in a chosen area of interest such as engineering, physics, chemistry, political science, history, etc. Students who are considering medical school may use these elective hours to fulfill the pre-med requirements. Others who are interested in careers in law may select political science courses for the pre-law path. Other concentration areas include (but are not limited to) healthcare, nursing, and language.

Graduates will be well-prepared for the 21st century by being able to think critically in broader contexts, because problems in contemporary society are not only technical but also social and economic in nature. This major provides a strong foundation for life-long learning and excellent problem solving skills.

Graduates may pursue graduate education to specialize in any field of their choice, such as business, medicine and law. Also, graduates will be able to work in a diverse spectrum of technical and non-technical fields such as public policy, policy analysis, technical sales and other fields where an advanced technology background would be a recognized asset.

Credit/No Credit Policy

All required engineering courses and prerequisite and co-requisite mathematics and statistics courses must be taken for a grade.

Program Requirements: General Engineering
(128-138 semester hours)

English (9 hours)
ENG 111 College Composition (MPF I) (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3)
ENG 313 Introduction to Technical Writing (3)

Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Science (12 hours)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
Miami Plan Humanities (MPF IIB) (3)
Miami Plan Fine Arts (MPF IIA) (3)
Miami Plan Fine Arts, Humanities, or Social Science (MPF II) (3)

United States and World Cultures (6 hours)
Miami Plan United States Cultures (MPF IIIA) (3)
Miami Plan World Cultures (MPF IIIB) (3)

Natural Science (19 hours)
CHM 141, 142 College Chemistry (MPF IVB) (6)
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World (MPF IVB) (8)
Two hours of lab – choose from PHY 183-184 or
        CHM 144 or 145 or an equivalent course
       from another department (MPF IVB, LAB)
Miami Plan Biological Science (MPF IVA) (3)
Mathematics, Statistics, and Computing (19 hours)
CSA 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
MTH 245 Differential Equations for Engineers (3)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)

Thematic Sequence (9 hours)

Capstone Experience (3 hours)

International Component (10-21 hours)*
Complete a semester in Luxembourg or a semester in another approved program or
       Foreign Language (3-14 hours)
       Two courses with international themes (6 hours)
       Project (1 hour)
* work with your adviser to tailor your program to meet your international interests

Required Engineering Courses (32 hours)
EAS 101 Computing, Engineering, and Society (1)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
CSA 273 Optimization Modeling (3)
CSA/ ECE 287 Digital Systems Design (4)
CSA 361 Societal and Ethical Issues in Computing (3)
ECE 205 Electric Circuit Analysis (3)
MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
MME 223 Engineering Materials (3)
MME/ PCE 314 Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
MME/ PCE 341 Engineering Economics (3)
PCE 204 Material and Energy Balances (3)
Engineering or computing elective approved by faculty adviser (3)

Electives (9-12 hours)

Manufacturing Engineering: Bachelor of Science in Engineering

For information contact the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, 56 Engineering Building (513-529-0710).

This program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (EAC/ABET).

The primary mission of the department is to provide quality graduates to meet societal and industrial needs. Manufacturing engineering deals with product and process design. It requires ability to plan the practices of manufacturing; to research and develop tools, manufacturing processes, machines and equipment, control strategies; and to integrate the facilities and systems so that quality products can be produced at a competitive cost.

Industry has a pressing need for academically qualified manufacturing engineers due to the fact that today's products and the technology to manufacture them have become increasingly more sophisticated. Examples of new manufacturing technologies being applied to increase productivity, improve quality, and reduce costs include computer-aided design, robotics, statistical process control, and computer-integrated manufacturing systems.

Contemporary society's and industry's problems are not only technical, but social and economic. The department provides graduates with in-depth education in mathematics, science, engineering science, manufacturing processes and methods, and engineering design, as well as requiring a broad education in computing, business, and liberal arts. The department is committed to excellence in undergraduate education: student learning, classroom effectiveness, assessment, engineering design and ethics integration, opportunities for leadership and student advising.

Graduates typically work as manufacturing engineers in areas such as product and process design, quality control, computer-aided manufacturing, and plant-facilities engineering. After having gained industrial experience in the above areas, graduates can move into technical management positions. Graduates may also continue their education at the graduate level. Graduating seniors are encouraged to take the Fundamentals of Engineering examination, which is the first of two examinations that lead to becoming a licensed professional engineer.

Educational Objectives

The following are the educational objectives for the Manufacturing Engineers. These are achieved and measured several years after the students graduate. The program develops students who:

  • solve problems by applying the knowledge required for manufacturing engineers.
  • solve engineering problems by applying mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering science.
  • solve engineering problems by applying engineering design.
  • verbally communicate effectively information related to their work.
  • write effectively information related to their work.
  • serve as an effective team member.
  • serve as an effective team leader.
  • serve on multidisciplinary teams.
  • integrate and utilize fundamental knowledge in computing, business, and liberal arts in their job.
  • know and practice ethical responsibility as outlined by the Engineering Code of Ethics.
  • engage in continuous learning and intellectual growth.

Departmental Honors

If you excel in your studies, you may qualify for the University Honors Program or the program for Honors in Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering. As a senior in these programs, you will have the opportunity to work closely with the faculty on research projects of interest.

Credit/No Credit Policy

All required engineering courses and all prerequisite and co-requisite courses must be taken for a grade.

Program Requirements (128 semester hours minimum)

Freshman year
First semester
EAS 101 Computing, Engineering, and Society (1)
ENG 111 College Composition (MPF I) (3)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
PHY 181, 183 The Physical World and Laboratory (MPF IVB) (4,1)
Miami Plan IIA, IIB, IIIA, IIIB elective (3)

Second semester
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
PHY 182, 184 The Physical World and Laboratory (MPF IVB) (4, 1)
Miami Plan IIA, IIB, IIIA, or IIIB elective (3)

Additional Required Courses in Major:
ECE 205 Electric Circuit Analysis (3)
MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
MME 213 Computational Methods in Engineering (3)
MME 223 Engineering Materials (3)
MME 231 Manufacturing Processes (3)
MME 311 Dynamic Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
MME 312 Mechanics of Materials (3)
MME 334 Quality Planning and Control (3)
MME 411 Machine and Tool Design (4)
MME 434 Advanced Manufacturing (3)
MME 435 Manufacturing Topics (3)
MME 437 Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Systems (3)
MME/ ECE 303 Computer-Aided Experimentation (3)
MME/ ECE 436 Control of Dynamic Systems (3)
MME 448 Senior Design Project (MPC) (2)
MME 449 Senior Design Project (MPC) (2)
MME/ PCE 313 Fluid Mechanics (3)
MME/ PCE 314 Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
MME/ PCE 341 Engineering Economics (3)

Technical Electives
select two:
CSA 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3)
CSA 271 Object Oriented Programming (3)*
CSA 273 Optimization Modeling (3)
CSA 278 Computer Architecture (3)
CSA 372 Analysis of Stochastic Systems (3)
CSA 484 Manufacturing Planning Systems (3)
ECE 287 Digital Systems Design (4)
ECE 304 Electronics (3)
ECE 305 Electric Circuit Analysis II (3)
ECE 306 Signals and Systems (3)
MME 315 Mechanical Vibrations (3)
MME/ PCE 403 Heat Transfer (3)
MME 412 Advanced Mechanics (3)
MME 414 Engineering Thermodynamics II (3)
MME 431 Cost Estimating for Engineers (3)
PHY 286 Introduction to Computational Physics (3)
PCE 482 Process Control (3)

Additional Required Related Courses
CHM 141 College Chemistry (MPF IVB) (3)
CHM 144 College Chemistry Laboratory (MPF IVB) (2)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
ENG 313 Technical Writing (3)
MTH 245 Differential Equations for Engineers (3)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
Miami Plan electives to fulfill Foundation and Thematic Sequence courses
not specified above.
* Prerequisite: CSA 174

Mechanical Engineering: Bachelor of Science in Engineering

For information contact the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, 56 Engineering Building (513-529-0710).

This program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (EAC/ABET)

Mechanical Engineering encompasses analysis and design of products and mechanical components of machines and systems. It requires the ability to understand and apply mathematics, science, and engineering science; to research concepts and apply modeling methods; to simulate and test working conditions and their impact on the designed systems; and to synthesize different elements in order to obtain the optimum design of a specific product.

The increasing sophisticaton in products and systems requires industry to hire academically qualified mechanical engineers who can apply current techniques and methods of engineering. Examples include computer-aided design, computer assisted engineering, finite-element analysis, robotics, heat transfer, dynamics, and advanced machine and tool design.

The mechanical engineer of the 21st century must be able to think critically in broader contexts because problems in contemporary society are not only technical, but also social and economic in nature. This program provides the student with a broad mechanical engineering education enhanced by courses in manufacturing engineering, electrical engineering, computer science and engineeering, economics, humanities, social science, United States and world cultures, and liberal arts.

Graduates have the opportunity to work in a diverse spectrum of professional fields. These vary from research to design, development to manufacturing, and technical sales to production. Many mechanical engineers work in manufacturing-related areas such as in the analysis and design of varied products and in non-technical sectors of the economy. Graduates will also be prepared to continue their education at the graduate level. Graduating seniors are encouraged to take the Fundamentals of Engineering examination, which is the first of two examinations that lead to becoming a licensed professional engineer.

Educational Objectives

The following are the educational objectives for the Mechanical Engineering Program. These are achieved and measured several years after the students graduate. The program develops students who:

  • solve problems by applying the knowledge required for mechanical engineers.
  • solve engineering problems by applying mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering science.
  • solve engineering problems by applying engineering design.
  • verbally communicate effectively information related to their work.
  • write effectively information related to their work.
  • serve as an effective team member.
  • serve as an effective team leader.
  • serve on multidisciplinary teams.
  • integrate and utilize fundamental knowledge in computing, business, and liberal arts in their job.
  • know and practice ethical responsibility as outlined by the Engineering Code of Ethics.
  • engage in continuous learning and intellectual growth..

Departmental Honors

If you excel in your studies, you may qualify for the University Honors Program or the program for Honors in Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering. As a senior in these programs, you will have the opportunity to work closely with the faculty on research projects of interest.

Credit/No Credit Policy

All required engineering courses and all prerequisite and co-requisite courses must be taken for a grade.

Program Requirements (131 semester hours*)

* Total hours for graduation depend on your mathematical preparation, computing background, and courses to fulfill the Thematic Sequence. Consult your faculty adviser for course selection.

Freshman year
First semester
EAS 101 Computing, Engineering, and Society (1)
ENG 111 College Composition (MPF I) (3)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
PHY 181, 183 The Physical World and Laboratory (MPF IVB, LAB) (4,1)
Miami Plan IIA, IIB, IIIA, or IIIB elective (3)

Second semester
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
PHY 182, 184 The Physical World and Laboratory (MPF IVB) (4,1)
Miami Plan IIA, IIB, IIIA, or IIIB elective (3)

Additional Required Courses in Major:
ECE 205 Electric Circuit Analysis (3)
MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
MME 213 Computational Methods in Engineering (3)
MME 223 Engineering Materials (3)
MME 231 Manufacturing Processes (3)
MME/ ECE 303 Computer-Aided Experimentation (3)
MME 311 Dynamic Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
MME 312 Mechanics of Materials (3)
MME/ PCE 313 Fluid Mechanics (3)
MME/ PCE 314 Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
MME 315 Mechanical Vibrations (3)
MME/ PCE 341 Engineering Economics (3)
MME/ PCE 403 Heat Transfer (3)
MME 411 Machine and Tool Design (4)
MME 412 Advanced Mechanics of Materials (3)
MME 414 Engineering Thermodynamics II (3)
MME/ ECE 436 Control of Dynamic Systems (3)
MME 448 Senior Design Project (MPC) (2)
MME 449 Senior Design Project (MPC) (2)

Technical electives - select two:
CSA 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3)
CSA 271 Object-Oriented Programming (3)*
CSA 273 Optimization Modeling (3)
CSA 372 Analysis of Stochastic Systems (3)
CSA 484 Manufacturing Planning Systems (3)
ECE 287 Digital Systems Design (4)
ECE 304 Electronics (3)
ECE 306 Signals and Systems (3)
MME 334 Quality Planning and Control (3)
MME 431 Cost Estimating for Engineers (3)
MME 434 Advanced Manufacturing (3)
MME 435 Manufacturing Topics (3)
MME 437 Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Systems (3)
PCE 482 Process Control (3)

Additional Required Related Courses:
CHM 141 College Chemistry (MPF IVB) (3)
CHM 144 College Chemistry Laboratory (MPF IVB, LAB) (2)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
ENG 313 Technical Writing (3)
MTH 231 Elements of Discrete Mathematics (3)
MTH 245 Differential Equations for Engineers (3)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
Miami Plan electives to fulfill Foundation and Thematic Sequence courses not specified above.

* Prerequisite: CSA 174

Nursing: Bachelor of Science in Nursing

For information contact the Department of Nursing, 152 University Hall, Hamilton campus (513-785-7772).

This department offers three nursing programs: baccalaureate, associate degree, and RN-BSN completion. A track for LPNs is embedded in the associate degree curriculum. The associate degree program, including the LPN track, and the RN-BSN completion program are accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC), 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006 (800-669-1656). The baccalaureate program is pursuing accreditation with the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), 1 Dupont Circle NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036 (202-887-6791). The associate degree program is described in the Hamilton and Middletown chapter.

Baccalaureate Degree Program

This program provides a balance of liberal arts and professional nursing courses. Emphasis is on the nursing process for health promotion, prevention, restoration, and maintenance with clients, family, and client groups in community health settings. Students are involved in activities preparatory for leadership and management roles and graduate study. Clinical experiences are one day a week during the second semester of the sophomore year and two days a week during the junior and senior years.

Special Admission Requirements

Admission to this program is selective and competitive. After admission to the university, a separate nursing application is submitted to the Admission Office at the Hamilton or Middletown campus. To be considered for admission to the program, you must meet the following minimum criteria­:

  • be a current high school student with a composite ACT of 23, a cumulative g.p.a. of 3.00, and a 3.00 g.p.a. in science courses (including chemistry with lab, and algebra I and II)
  • have completed 12 semester hours (100 level or higher) at Miami with a cumulative g.p.a. of 2.50 and a grade of C or better in two of the following courses: ZOO 171, 172; CHM 131; or MBI 161.

Note: Individuals who have a felony conviction may be denied the opportunity to take the State Board of Nursing licensing examination.­

Transfer Credit

Transfer credits for other colleges will require departmental evaluation to meet the above criteria. It is important to meet with a department adviser.

Program Requirements (114-115 semester hours)

First Year
First semester
CHM 131 Chemistry of Life Processes (MPF IVB) (4)
ENG 111 College Composition (MPF I) (3)
ZOO 171 Human Anatomy and Physiology (MPF IVA) (4)
Miami Plan Foundation IIA Fine Arts course (3)
Miami Plan Foundation IIB Humanities course (3)

Second semester
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3
KNH 102 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3)
MBI 161 Elementary Medical Microbiology (MPF IVA) (4)
ZOO 172 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)
Miami Plan Foundation IIIA U.S. Cultures course (3)

Second Year
First semester
NSG 251 Therapeutic Communication in Nursing (3)
NSG 252 Foundations of Professional Nursing (4)
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4)
ZOO 232 Human Heredity (3)
Miami Plan Foundation II elective from A, B, or C
Second semester
MBI 361 Epidemiology (MPT) (3)
NSG 261 Health and Physical Assessment (3)
NSG 262 Fundamentals of Professional Nursing Practice (4)
Required psychosocial course, choose from: PSY 231; SOC 202 or 348; EDP 272 or 356
Miami Plan Foundation IIIB World Cultures course

Third Year
First semester
NSG 349 Introduction to the Principles of Pharmacology in Nursing Practice (3)
NSG 351 Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family (2)
NSG 352 Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family Clinical (3)
NSG 353 Nursing Care of Adults with Health Alterations I (3)
NSG 354 Nursing Care of Adults with Health Alterations I Clinical (3)
Miami Plan Foundation V elective course (3)

Second semester
NSG 331 Introduction to Nursing Research (2)
NSG 343 Health Care Informatics (3)
NSG 361 Nursing Care of Adults with Health Alterations II (3)
NSG 362 Nursing Care of Adults with Health Alterations II Clinical (3)
NSG 363 Nursing Care of Children (2)
NSG 364 Nursing Care of Children Clinical (3)

Fourth Year
First semester
NSG 402 Professional Nurse Leader (3)
NSG 430 Nursing Care of Aggregates: Families and Communities (3)
NSG 431 Nursing Care of Aggregates: Families and Communities Clinical (3)
NSG 451 Nursing Care of Clients Experiencing Mental Health Disorders (3)
NSG 452 Nursing Care of Clients Experiencing Mental Health Disorders Clinical (3)
NSG elective (3)

Second semester
NSG 435 Challenges in Health Care Delivery (3)
NSG 461 Nursing Care of Older Adults (3)
NSG 462 Nursing Care of Older Adults Clinical (3)
NSG 463 Nursing Care of Adults with Multi-System Health Alterations (3)
NSG 464 Nursing Care of Adults with Multi-System Health Alterations Clinical (3)

RN-BSN Completion Program

This program is designed for registered nurses with either a diploma or an associate degree in nursing. The program emphasizes community health, research, leadership, and complex health problems. Graduates are prepared for leadership and management roles and graduate study. Clinical experiences are one day a week. The program is available full-time or part-time. Selected nursing courses for this program are also available online; please check with the Department of Nursing office.

Special Admission Requirements

Admission to this program is selective and competitive. After admission to the university, a separate nursing application is submitted to the Department of Nursing BSN Program at Hamilton or Middletown. To be considered for admission to the program, the following minimum criteria­ must be met:1) be a registered nurse in the State of Ohio; 2) have met all prerequisite course requirements with a "C" or better in each required course; and, 3) have at least a 2.00 g.p.a.

Graduates of diploma and non-NLNAC accredited associate's degree programs are required to complete 32 Miami semester hours and pass NSG 301, 311, and 313 before their 28 hours of transfer credit will be validated. Graduates of accredited associate's degree programs can transfer 28 semester hours of nursing credit from a regionally accredited two-year college. Additional transfer hours may be used as elective credit.

Transfer Credit

Transfer credits for other colleges will require departmental evaluation to meet the above criteria. It is important to meet with a department adviser.

Program Requirements (114-115 semester hours)

Prerequisites (53 semester hours)
CHM 131 Chemistry of Life Processes (MPF IVB) (4)
ENG 111 College Composition (MPF I) (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3) or
        ENG 113 Advanced College Composition (MPF I) (3)
MBI 161 Elementary Medical Microbiology (MPF IVA) (4)
ZOO 171 Human Anatomy and Physiology (MPF IVA) (4)
ZOO 172 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)
3 hour social science course: select from Miami Plan Foundation (MPF IIC)
28 hours of associate degree nursing courses

Support Courses and Miami Plan Courses (27-28 semester hours)
MBI 361 Epidemiology (MPT) (3)
PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (MPT) (3) or
        EDP 356 Human Development (MPT) (3) or
        SOC 202 Social Deviance (4) or
        SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3) or
        EDP 272 Introduction to Disability Studies
ZOO 232 Human Heredity (3) or
        ZOO 325 Pathophysiology (4)
18 hours of Miami Plan courses : MPF IIA (3), MPF IIB (3), MPF IIA, B, or C (3)
MPF IIIA (3), MPF IIIB (3), MPF V (3)

Required Major Courses (34 semester hours)
NSG 301 Theory-Based Nursing Practice (3)
NSG 311 Health Promotion Across Lifespan (3)
NSG 313 Assessment of Well Individual (2)
NSG 317 Teaching Strategies in Health Care (3)
NSG 331 Introduction to Nursing Research (3)
NSG 402 Professional Nurse Leader (3)
NSG 418 Complex Health Problems (3)
NSG 419 Complex Health Problems—Clinical (2)
NSG 430 Nursing Care of Aggregates: Families and Communities (3)
NSG 431 Nursing Care of Aggregates: Families and Communities-Clinical (3)
NSG 435 Challenges in Health Care Delivery (Capstone) (3)
NSG elective (3)

School Nurse Licensure Program

The School Nurse Licensure Program is designed to prepare practitioners who deliver health services including direct nursing care and health education to school clients, their families, and the school community. Admission to the program is selective and is for registered nurses who have a BSN or who are in the process of completing the BSN degree at Miami University. Applicants must have a 3.00 g.p.a.

Program Requirements (23 semester hours)

Required Nursing Courses
NSG 312 Assessment of the Well Child (1)
NSG 405 School Nurse Practicum (10)
NSG/ EDP 492/592 Individual with Severe Behavioral Handicaps and/or Emotional Disturbances: Social, Educational, Health, and Legal Issues (3)

Educational Core Courses
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (3)
EDL 318E Leadership in Education (3)
EDP 256 Psychology of the Exceptional Learner (3)

Paper Science and Engineering: Bachelor of Science in Paper Science and Engineering

For information contact the Department of Paper and Chemical Engineering, 64 Engineering Building (513-529-0760).

Note: Changes in courses and curriculum requirements are being considered as this Bulletin goes to press. For more information contact the Department of Paper Science and Engineering at the number shown above.

This program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (EAC/ABET).

This program provides a broad science and general engineering education for professional entry-level positions in pulp and paper or allied industries. Students learn to apply scientific and engineering principles to the solution of industry problems by following a course sequence emphasizing chemistry, chemical engineering, and paper engineering. Graduates are qualified for process engineering, production management, technical sales, or research positions.

Merit scholarships provided by the industry-supported Miami University Paper Science and Engineering Foundation enable students with good academic records to receive from partial tuition to as much as full in-state student costs (tuition, fees, room, and board) during undergraduate study. Out-of-state students may be eligible for an additional award of $2,000 per year.

Educational Objectives

The educational objectives of the program are for the graduate to:

  • have and apply the technical knowledge, skills, and expertise required of a process engineer to achieve practical solutions to problems in the paper industry or for a company allied to the paper industry,
  • have the organizational, leadership, and general communication skills needed in the profession.
  • have the key personal attributes desirable in an engineer and use these attributes to continue to learn and develop.
Program Requirements (minimum 128 semester hours)

Paper and chemical engineering courses (54 semester hours)
PCE 201 Principles of Paper Science and Engineering (3)
PCE 202 Pulp and Paper Physics (3)
PCE 204 Material and Energy Balances (3)
PCE 219 Statics and Mechanics of Materials (3)
PCE 301 Pulp and Paper Chemistry (3)
PCE 311 Unit Operations Laboratory I (2)
PCE 312 Unit Operations Laboratory II (2)
PCE 313 Fluid Mechanics (3)
PCE 314 Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
PCE 341 Engineering Economics (3)
PCE 403 Heat Transfer (3)
PCE 404 Papermaking (3)
PCE 405 Industrial Environmental Control (3)
PCE 411 Advanced Paper Manufacturing (3)
PCE 414 Mass Transfer (3)
PCE 425 Surface and Colloid Science of Papermaking (3)
PCE 461 Coating Technology (3)
PCE 471 Engineering Design I (2)
PCE 472 Engineering Design II (2)
PCE 482 Process Control (3)

Chemistry courses (19 semester hours)
CHM 141,144 College Chemistry/Laboratory (MPF IVB) (3,2)
CHM 142,145 College Chemistry/ Laboratory (3,2)
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4)
CHM 363,364 Analytical Chemistry/Laboratory (3,2)

Related required courses (40 semester hours)
EAS 101 Computing, Engineering, and Society (1)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
ENG 111 College Composition (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3)
ENG 313 Introduction to Technical Writing (3)
PHY 181,182 The Physical World (4,4)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5)
MTH 245 Differential Equations for Engineers (3)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)

Completion of Miami Plan. See your faculty adviser for this selection.

Grade Requirements

You must earn a grade of C- or better in the following courses: CHM 141, 142, 144, 145, and 231; PHY 181; MTH 151, 245, and 251.

You must earn a grade of C- or better in the following basic engineering courses: PCE 204, 313, 314, 341, and 403.

Credit/No-Credit Policy

All engineering, chemistry, physics, mathematics, statistics, computer science and systems analysis, and English listed above as requirements for the B.S. in Paper Science and Engineering may not be taken on a credit/no-credit basis. All other Miami Plan courses may be taken credit/no credit.

Transfer Credit Policy

To obtain transfer credit for any 300- or 400-level PCE course, you must first receive written departmental approval before enrolling in that course at another college or university. Transfer credit may be obtained for only one engineering course in the series PCE 204, 313, 403, 414. Contact the department if transferring into this program.

Graduate Degree

The department also offers a Master of Science degree. Graduates with majors in chemical engineering, chemistry, microbiology, zoology, physics, or paper science and engineering find their background adaptable to this program. Graduates with majors in other sciences may be required to take additional course work. Additional information may be found in the Graduate Bulletin.

Systems Analysis: Bachelor of Science in Systems Analysis

Note: The Bachelor of Science in Systems Analysis was under revision at the time of printing. For information contact the Department of Computer Science and Systems Analysis, 205 Benton Hall (513-529-0340).

This program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (CAC/ABET).

Systems analysis is a holistic and logical approach to solving engineering and business problems. A system is defined as a set of components that work together toward a common goal. Systems analysts explore the behavior of current systems to model the relationships between the components to recommend modifications that will improve system performance. They also design new systems using the latest software tools and design techniques to satisfy customer requirements.

Systems analysis is a multidisciplinary field that includes programming, probability and statistics, mathematics, software engineering, and operations research. Systems analysts combine their knowledge from these fields with the framework of the scientific method to:

  • Define the scope of a problem
  • Determine objectives, constraints, and performance measures
  • Identify alternative courses of action
  • Evaluate the alternatives according to the performance measures
  • Recommend solutions that will meet the needs of a decision maker.

This is an excellent major for students interested in problem solving, computer science, mathematics, working and communicating with others, and analyzing and meeting others' needs. Upon entering this program, you should have an interest in analytical thinking and problem solving, an aptitude for mathematics, an interest in working with people, and good communication skills.

The curriculum integrates coursework in computer science, information systems, mathematics, probability and statistics, oral and written communication, the liberal arts, and science. Each student is required to choose a special interest area (four courses) in another discipline such as business, engineering, technical writing, or the sciences.

Departmental Honors

If you excel in your studies, you may qualify for the University Honors Program or the program for Honors in Computer Science and Systems Analysis. As a senior in these programs you will have the opportunity to work closely with faculty on research projects of interest.

Credit/No-Credit Policy

All required systems analysis courses and prerequisite mathematics and statistics courses must be taken for a grade.

Special Interest Areas

You are required to choose a special interest area to give you knowledge of an application area. This area usually consists of 12 or more semester hours beyond departmental requirements with at least six hours at 300-400 level. Consult with your adviser before making a decision. You should declare your special interest area by completing a form at the department office at the beginning of the second semester of your sophomore year.

You should choose an area that is consistent with your academic interests and career goals. Some examples of special interest areas include general business, mathematics, psychology, engineering, music, physics, and accountancy. You may be able to incorporate Thematic Sequence courses into your special interest area.

Graduate Degree

The department also offers a combined bachelor's/master's degree program that allows students to complete these two degrees in an accelerated manner. Students are eligible to apply for this program in their junior year. Please contact the CSA department for more information.

Other graduate programs offered by the department are a Master's in Computer Science and a Certificate in Software Development. Additional information is available in the Graduate Bulletin or from the CSA department office.

Program Requirements: Systems Analysis
(128 semester hours minimum)

English (9 hours)
ENG 111 College Composition (MPF I) (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3)
ENG 313 Technical Writing (3)

Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Science (12 hours)
COM 135 Public Expression/Critical Inquiry (MPF IIB) (3)*
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3) or
        ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
Miami Plan IIA Fine Arts Elective (3)
Additional Miami Plan Foundation IIA, B, or C elective (3)
* COM 231 can be substituted for COM 135, but COM 231 does not fulfill the Miami Plan humanities requirement.

United States and World Cultures (6 hours)
Miami Plan Foundation IIIA United States Cultures elective (3)
Miami Plan Foundation IIIB World Cultures elective (3)

Natural Science (12-14 hours)
Choose one of these sequences:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115, 116 (MPF IVA) (8) and a Natural Science (MPF IVB) (4)
CHM 141,144 and 142 ,145 (10 hours, 5 of which are MPF IVB) and
       a Biological Science (MPF IVA) (4)
PHY 181,183 and 182,184 (MPF IVB) (10) and a Biological Science (MPF IVA) (3)

Mathematics/Statistics/Computer Science (16 hours)
MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF V) (5)
MTH 231 Elements of Discrete Mathematics (3)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)

Thematic Sequence (9 hours)
The MTH 2 Basic Mathematical Tools for Science thematic sequence is fulfilled by CSA requirements ( MTH 151, MTH 231, and STA 301).

Systems analysis required core (37 hours)
EAS 101 Computing, Engineering and Society (1)
CSA 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3)
CSA 271 Object-Oriented Programming (3)
CSA 273 Optimization Modeling (3)
CSA 274 Data Abstraction and Data Structures (3)
CSA 278 Computer Architecture (3)
CSA 283 Data Communications and Networks (3)
CSA 348 Applied Software Engineering (3)
CSA 361 Societal and Ethical Issues in Computing (3)
CSA 372 Stochastic Modeling (3)
CSA 385 Database Systems (3)
CSA 448 Senior Design Project I (MPC) (2)*
CSA 449 Senior Design Project II (MPC) (2)*
CSA 471 Simulation (3)
* IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum may be substituted for CSA 448/449, but only with prior approval from the CSA Department. See your CSA adviser before enrolling.

Systems analysis electives (12 hours)
CSA 275 Data Processing and File Design (3)
CSA 371 Linear and Nonlinear Programming Models (3)
CSA 381 Operating Systems (3)
CSA 383 Client Server Systems (3)
CSA 386 Introduction to Computer Graphics (3)
CSA 464 Algorithms (3)
CSA 465 Comparative Programming Languages (3)
CSA 467 Computer and Network Security (3)
CSA 470 Special Topics (3)
CSA 473 Automata, Formal Languages and Computability (3)
CSA 474 Compiler Design (3)
CSA 480 Special Problems (Honors Program) (3)
CSA 483 Statistical Forecasting (3)
CSA 485 Advanced Database Systems (3)
CSA 486 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3)
CSA 487 Game Design and Implementation (3)
CSA 491 Undergraduate Research (3)
STA 463 Regression Analysis (4)

Special interest courses (12 hours)

Minors

A minor is a specific program to be taken along with a major to complement your skills and to increase your career opportunities. Taking a minor is optional. More information about minors is included in the Other Requirements chapter. The required semester hours are in parentheses with each minor.

Chemical Engineeering (20 semester hours)

For information contact the Department of Paper and Chemical Engineering, 64 Engineering Building (513-529-0760).

The objective of this program is to expand the educational opportunities of Miami students into the traditional discipline of chemical engineering. The minor provides an understanding of basic chemical engineering principles, concepts, and methodologies and how they are applied to the design and performance analysis of industrial processes. This minor is for students not majoring in Paper Science and Engineering or Chemical Engineering.

A minimum cumulative g.p.a. of 2.00 is required for all courses in the minor. Twenty semester hours beyond the prerequisite chemistry, physics, and mathematics are required. None of these courses may be taken on a credit/no credit basis.

The minor satisfies Thematic Sequence PCE 1: Chemical Engineeering Principles.

Program Requirements

Prerequisites:
CHM 142 College Chemistry (MPT) (3)
MTH 245 Differential Equations for Engineers (3) or
MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)
PHY 182 The Physical World (MPT) (4)

All of these:
CHM 363 Analytical Chemistry (3)
CHM 364 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (2)
PCE 204 Material and Energy Balances (3)
PCE 219 Statics and Mechanics of Materials (3)
PCE/ MME 313 Fluid Mechanics (3)
PCE/ MME 314 Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
PCE/ MME 403 Heat Transfer (3)
PCE 414 Mass Transfer (3)

Computer Engineeering (20-22 semester hours)

For information contact the Department of Electrical and Computing Engineering, 260 Engineering Building (513-529-0741).

The objective of this minor is to provide the student with a broad introduction to computer engineering with an emphasis on computer-based solutions to engineering problems. The minor combines a strong base in science, math, computer science, engineering science, and design. After completing this minor, students will be able to design and build computer-based digital electronic systems.

A minimum cumulative g.p.a. of 2.00 is required for all courses in the minor. A minimum of 20 semester hours beyond the prerequisite courses in math and physics are required. None of these courses may be taken on a credit/no credit basis.

Program Requirements

Prerequisites (16 hours):
CSA 271 Object-Oriented Programming (3)
MTH 245 Differential Equations for Engineers (3) or equivalent
PHY 181,182 The Physical World (MPF IVB) (4,4)
PHY 183,184 Physics Laboratory (MPF IVB, LAB) (1,1)

All of these (14-16 hours)
CSA/ ECE 278 Computer Architecture (3)
ECE 287 Digital Systems Design (4)
ECE 205 Electric Circuit Analysis (3) or
PHY 292,294 Electronic Instrumentation and Laboratory (3,2)
ECE 387 Embedded Systems Design (4)

Elective Courses (6 hours)
Any two of these*:
CSA 381 Operating Systems (3)
ECE 304 Electronics (3)
ECE 305 Electric Circuit Analysis II (3)
ECE 414 Introduction to VLSI and System Design (3)
ECE 436 Control of Dynamic Systems (3)
ECE 461 Network Modeling and Performance Analysis (3)
ECE 470 Special Topics (3)

*MME, PHY, and CSA majors must select both elective courses outside of their home department.

Computer Science (18 semester hours)

For information contact the Department of Computer Science and Systems Analysis, 205 Benton Hall (513-529-0340).

This minor is for students in majors other than computer science or systems analysis. The objective is to provide a cohesive program enabling students to learn the fundamentals of software design and development and a variety of other topics in computer science. In addition to gaining an understanding of the software design and development process, students will acquire problem solving and algorithm design skills. Electives in sub-fields of computer science including computer networks, operating systems, database, software engineering, graphics, and computer architecture permit the student to study particular areas of interest.

According to University guidelines, all minor courses must be taken for a letter grade and you must earn an overall 2.00 g.p.a. in these courses.

Program Requirements

Required courses (6 hours):
CSA 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (MPT) (3)
CSA 271 Object-Oriented Programming (MPT) (3)

One of these courses (3 hours):
CSA 274 Data Abstraction and Data Structures (MPT) (3)
CSA 283 Data Communications and Networks (3)
CSA/ ECE 278 Computer Architecture (3)

Electives (minimum 9 hours):
Choose nine additional hours of coursework selected from CSA
courses at 200-level or higher, and ECE 287.

Electrical Engineering (19-22 semester hours)

For information contact the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 260 Engineering Building (513-529-0741).

This minor is for students not majoring in electrical engineering or manufacturing engineering. This minor provides fundamentals of electrical and electronic engineering, which includes a variety of industrial applications involving electrical/electronic circuits and microprocessor systems. It combines a strong base in engineering science with project-based laboratory and design experience.

A minimum cumulative g.p.a. of 2.00 is required for all courses in the minor. Nineteen semester hours beyond the prerequisite to engineering science are required. None of these courses may be taken on a credit/no-credit basis.

Program Requirements

Prerequisites (13 hours)
MTH 245 Differential Equations for Engineers (3)
PHY 181,182 The Physical World (4, 4)
PHY 183,184 Physics Laboratory (1,1)

All of these (13-15 hours)
ECE 205 Electric Circuit Analysis (3) or
        PHY 292 Electronics Instrumentation (3) and
        PHY 294 Laboratory in Electronics Instrumentation (2)
ECE 287 Digital Systems Design (4)
ECE 305 Electric Circuit Analysis II (3)
ECE 306 Signals and Systems (3)

Elective courses (6-7 hours)
Select two:
ECE 304 Electronics (3)
ECE 325 Applied Electromagnetics (3)
ECE 387 Embedded Systems Design (4)
ECE 425 Digital Signal Processing (3)
ECE/ MME 436 Control of Dynamic Systems (3)
ECE 453 Communication Systems (3)
ECE 461 Network Modeling and Performance Analysis (3)
ECE 470 Special Topics (3)

Manufacturing Engineering (18 semester hours)

For information contact the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, 56 Engineering Building (513-529-0710).

This minor is for students not majoring in engineering management, manufacturing engineering, or mechanical engineering. This minor provides fundamentals of manufacturing engineering, including a variety of industrial applications dealing with manufacturing processes, statistical process control, and designing for productivity. It combines a strong base in engineering science with project-based laboratory and design experience. This minor satisfies Thematic Sequence MME 2 Modeling, Computer Graphics, and Design.

A minimum cumulative g.p.a. of 2.00 is required for all courses in the minor. Eighteen semester hours beyond the prerequisite to engineering science are required. None of these courses may be taken on a credit/no-credit basis.

Program Requirements

Prerequisites:
CHM 141 College Chemistry (3)
EAS 101 Computing, Engineering, and Society (1)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
PHY 181 The Physical World (4)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4) or equivalent.

All of these (18 semester hours):
MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
MME 213 Computational Methods in Engineering (3)
MME 223 Engineering Materials (3)
MME 231 Manufacturing Processes (3)
MME 311 Dynamic Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
MME 334 Quality Planning and Control (3)

Mechanical Engineering (18 semester hours)

For information contact the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, 56 Engineering Building (513-529-0710).

This minor is for students not majoring in manufacturing engineering or mechanical engineering. This minor provides fundamentals of mechanical engineering, including a variety of industrial applications involving product design, experimental analysis, and engineering modeling techniques. It combines a strong base in engineering science with project-based laboratory and design experience.

A minimum cumulative g.p.a. of 2.00 is required for all courses in the minor. Eighteen semester hours beyond the prerequisite to engineering science are required. None of these courses may be taken on credit/no-credit basis.

Program Requirements

Prerequisites:
EAS 101 Computing, Engineering, and Society (1)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
PHY 181,182 The Physical World (4,4)

All of these:
MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
MME 213 Computational Methods in Engineering (3)
MME 311 Dynamic Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
MME 312 Mechanics of Materials (3)
MME/ PCE 313 Fluid Mechanics (3)
MME/ PCE 314 Engineering Thermodynamics (3)

Paper Engineering (19 semester hours)

For information contact the Department of Paper and Chemical Engineering, 64 Engineering Building (513-529-0760).

The minor introduces the science and engineering of papermaking. The educational experience will prepare the student for a career as a project/process engineer in the paper and allied industries.

A minimum cumulative g.p.a. of 2.00 is required for all courses in the minor. Twenty semester hours beyond the prerequisite chemistry, physics, and mathematics are required. None of these courses may be taken on a credit/no credit basis.

Program Requirements

Prerequisites (24 hours):
EAS 101 Computing, Engineering, and Society (1)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF IIC) (3)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
PHY 181 The Physical World (MPF IVB) (4)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)

Required Courses (19 hours):
PCE 201 Principles of Paper Science and Engineering (3)
PCE 202 Pulp and Paper Physics (3)
PCE 219 Statics and Mechanics of Materials (3) or
        MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
PCE/ MME 313 Fluid Mechanics (3)
PCE/ MME 341 Engineering Economics (3)
PCE 404 Papermaking (3)
PCE 471, 472 Engineering Design I & II (1, 2)

Strongly Recommended:
PCE 320 Professional Practice (0)


General Bulletin Home | Search | Top | Miami University Main Page