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General Bulletin 2008-2010

Programs of Study

The College of Arts and Science

General Information

The College of Arts and Science has as its primary purpose provision for a liberal education, which has been defined traditionally as one that assures intellectual enlargement through general study of arts and science. A liberal education should expand students' awareness of diverse approaches to understanding and transmitting knowledge and free them from the narrow perspectives of specialization uninformed by a general knowledge of the various systems of scientific and humane thought that have shaped civilizations. This generalized inquiry provides the basis for a sense of community within the College of Arts and Science and the understanding necessary to an enlightened re-evaluation of culture.

The College offers the degrees Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Arts in International Studies, and Bachelor of Science. An associate's degree is also offered at Middletown campus; this program is described in the Hamilton and Middletown chapter.

Accreditation

Departments accredited by professional associations are: the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry by the American Chemical Society, the Department of Psychology by the American Psychological Association, and the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology by the American Speech and Hearing Association.

General Requirements

These are the general requirements of the College of Arts and Science for graduation:

  • Fulfill the Miami Plan for Liberal Education (MP), the College Requirement (CAS), and the requirements of your major.
  • Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 and a 2.00 average in all courses taken in your department(s) of major.
  • Earn at least 128 semester hours, 56 must be advanced (at 200 level and above).

If you are a transfer student, you must take a substantial portion of your major requirements at Miami. You must consult with the Chief Departmental Adviser of your major department at the time of transfer.

The College Requirement (CAS)

The divisional requirement in Arts and Science is called the College Requirement (CAS). If you are working toward the Bachelor of Arts (A.B.), you must fulfill all sections of the CAS; if you are working toward the Bachelor of Science (B.S.), you must fulfill only CAS-A (foreign language), but the B.S. requires more hours of concentration in your major. In many cases, you can fulfill sections of the Miami Plan and the College Requirement with the same course.

The College Requirement includes:

CAS-A Foreign Language
CAS-B Humanities
CAS-C Social Science
CAS-D Natural Science
CAS-E Formal Reasoning

When you plan your program, keep these important points in mind:

  • Although some CAS and Miami Plan courses overlap, you cannot use all courses that fulfill sections of the Miami Plan to fulfill sections of the College Requirement. See the chart later in this section.
  • Some courses you take for the Miami Plan or the College Requirement can also help fulfill your major requirements. In addition, any course cross-listed in two or more departments can be used to satisfy a requirement appropriate to any of the departments in which it is listed.

CAS-A Foreign Language

Direct acquisition of a different communication system facilitates access to a foreign culture. It also promotes understanding of how language structures human consciousness, increases the understanding of your own language, and makes possible a more informed awareness of the interaction between language and other social institutions.

All foreign languages taught at Miami are applicable for this requirement. They include Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. If you take a course with a 202-level course prerequisite, that course automatically satisfies CAS-A.

Greek 202 or Latin 202 may fulfill either CAS-A or CAS-B-LIT, but not both.

Requirement: The foreign language requirement may be met in any one of the following ways:
• By passing the 202 course (or its equivalent in a program abroad), or a language course at the 300 level or above. Other 200-level courses or courses in English translation do not apply to this requirement.
• By passing the foreign language portion of the Advanced Placement examination with an appropriate score. This test, sponsored by the College Entrance Examination Board, is usually administered during the junior or senior year in high school. Information on Advanced Placement and acceptable scores is in the Academic Planning chapter of this Bulletin.
• For Bachelor of Science students only, this section of the College Requirement may also be met by passing a reading examination in a foreign language over suitable material from within your discipline. Information on this examination is available from any foreign language department.
• International students whose native language is not English may use English to satisfy the foreign language requirement. (See the Associate Director of Admission.)
• Students who are fluent in a language not offered at Miami University must petition the College of Arts and Science Committee of Advisers to satisfy this requirement through another college or university.
• In some language departments admission to language skills courses may be denied to native or quasi-native speakers and heritage speakers.
The foreign language placement guide in the Academic Planning section describes the background necessary to enter a course at a certain level; this will help you choose your first course. Placement tests do not award academic credit.

CAS-B Humanities (9 semester hours)

Liberally educated students become familiar with and understand human values expressed through society. They know events and ideas that help form ideals, classical and contemporary literature that expresses beliefs, and religious and philosophical principles that stand behind actions. They are cognizant of processes whereby these values and works came into being, of methods by which they may be examined, and of needs and desires they express and fulfill.

Requirement: You must complete at least six of the required nine semester hours from courses within the College of Arts and Science in two of the following four categories: history, literature, philosophy, and religion. These hours may also be used to fulfill Group II (Fine Arts, Humanities) of the Miami Plan if they are designated MPF II A or B or Group III (U.S. or World Cultures) if designated MPF III. The additional three hours may be from other courses not in the categories listed above as long as they have been approved by the College of Arts and Science and are designated as CAS-B in the course descriptions.

"History" includes all courses offered by the Department of History.

"Literature" includes all literature courses offered by the departments of Classics; English; French and Italian; German, Russian, and East Asian Languages; Spanish and Portuguese; and Theatre. These literature courses are designated CAS-B-LIT in the Courses of Instruction chapter. Greek 202 or Latin 202 may fulfill either CAS-A or CAS-B-LIT, but not both.

"Philosophy" includes all courses offered by the Department of Philosophy, except PHL 273 or 373, which can only be used to fulfill CAS-E.

"Religion" includes all courses offered by the Department of Comparative Religion.

CAS-C Social Science (9 semester hours)

Through study of social science (the systematic study of human behavior, human institutions, and theoretical models through which human beings attempt to organize their lives), liberally educated students become familiar with regularities and variations in human behavior, with explanations of these regularities and variations, with methods useful in systematically and objectively validating propositions concerning these phenomena, and with potential for analyzing human behavior objectively.

Requirement: You must complete at least six of the nine required semester hours from courses within the College of Arts and Science in two of the following six categories: anthropology; economics; geography except GEO 121, 424, 431, 432; political science; psychology; and sociology and gerontology. These hours may also be used to fulfill Group II (Social Science) of the Miami Plan if they are designated MPF IIC or Group III (U.S. or World Cultures) if designated MPF III. The additional three hours may be from other courses not in the categories above as long as they have been approved by the College of Arts and Science and are designated as CAS-C in the course descriptions.

"Anthropology" includes all courses offered under the anthropology area.

"Economics" includes all courses offered by the Department of Economics.

"Geography" includes all courses offered by the Department of Geography except GEO 121, 424, 431, and 432.

"Political Science" includes all courses offered by the Department of Political Science.

"Psychology" includes all courses offered by the Department of Psychology

"Sociology and Gerontology" includes all courses offered in the sociology and gerontology areas.

CAS-D Natural Science (10 semester hours)

The liberally educated student learns to understand natural phenomena through observations and experimentation. Physical sciences are involved largely with behavior of energy, particles, atoms, and molecules. Biological sciences are concerned with nature, variation, richness, and interactions of phenomena of life. The natural science requirement introduces you to various aspects of scientific inquiry as practiced in botany, chemistry, geology, microbiology, physical geography, physics, and zoology. Laboratory experience is included to demonstrate the relationship between theories or models used within a given science and experimental results.

Requirement: You must complete at least 10 semester hours from courses within the College of Arts and Science natural science areas, including at least three semester hours in physical science and three in biological science. One course must be either a laboratory course or a course that includes laboratory work; these courses are designated CAS-D/LAB in course descriptions. Nine of these hours may also fulfill Group IV (Natural Science) of the Miami Plan if they are designated MPF IV.

Physical science includes all courses offered by the departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geology, and Physics; AER 118; GEO 121, and GEO 424. (Other geography courses may be used to fulfill CAS-C, social science.)

Biological science includes all courses offered by the departments of Botany, Microbiology, and Zoology and GEO 431, 432.

CAS-E Formal Reasoning (3 semester hours)

Liberally educated students enhance their capacity to reason through the study in inductive and deductive thinking. Disciplines that employ formalized languages as the means to develop such thinking include mathematics, statistics, logic, and linguistics.

College courses in formal reasoning explicitly develop the student's ability to:

  • generate conjectures and hypotheses inductively by examining patterns, trends, and examples and counter-examples;
  • confirm or reject these conjectures by formal deductive logic;
  • recognize that certain types of knowledge are dependent upon the application of systematic argument based on specific sets of assumptions; and
  • begin to apply skills of formal reasoning and critical thinking to different sets of assumptions to generate different systems of knowledge.

Requirement: You must complete at least three semester hours chosen from the courses listed below. Courses listed below do not apply for any other sections of the College Requirement (CAS). These hours may also be used to fulfill Group V (Mathematics, Formal Reasoning and Technology) of the Miami Plan if they are designated MPF V.

ENG/ SPN 303, GER/ ATH 309 Introduction to Linguistics (4)
MTH 121 Finite Mathematical Models (3)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5)
MTH 153 Calculus I (4)
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
PHL 273 Formal Logic (4)
PHL 373 Symbolic Logic (4)
STA 261 Statistics (4)

You should consult the mathematics and statistics placement guide in the Academic Planning chapter or an adviser in the department if you are thinking about taking a mathematics course for this requirement.

Within the College of Arts and Science, there are three divisions (areas) of major: humanities, social science, and natural science.

Interdisciplinary Programs

Note: At the time of the printing of this Bulletin, the Western Program, the successor to the Western College Program, is being developed and considered by the faculty of the College of Arts and Science.

The College of Arts and Science offers a range of interdisciplinary programs including specialized degrees, major, minors, and co-majors. These interdisciplinary programs allow students to consider a topic, subject, or problem from differing perspectives and to explore connections between those academic disciplines. Students pursuing these programs work closely with professors and advisers to select courses from across the curriculum that will provide opportunities to identify the intersections between multiple disciplines.

The College of Arts and Science offers interdisciplinary programs in the following areas:

Majors:
American Studies
Black World Studies
International Studies
Italian Studies
Journalism
Latin American Studies
Women's Studies

Co-Majors:
Environmental Principles and Practices
Environmental Science
Interactive Media Studies

Minors:
American Studies
Black World Studies
East Asian Studies
Ethics
European Area Studies
Film Studies
Global Perspectives on Sustainability
Interactive Media Studies
Jewish Studies
Latin American Studies
Medieval Studies
Middle East and Islamic Studies
Molecular Biology
Neuroscience
Women's Studies

Basic Requirements: Bachelor of Arts (A.B.)

Miami Plan Foundation MPF Fulfills Both MPF & CAS College of Arts & Science CAS
I. Composition (6 hrs)
ENG 109; 111-112; 113
   
    CAS-A Foreign Language:
• Pass a course at the 202 level, or higher; NO courses in translation
•  Earn required score on CLEP or AP test; see Bulletin for details
II. Fine Arts, Humanities,
Social Science (12 hrs)
   
A. Fine Arts
(at least 3 hrs)
MPF Fine Arts courses that also fulfill CAS-B:
ARC 188; ART 185, 186, 187, 188, 280; MUS 185, 189; THE 101, 191
 
B. Humanities
(at least 3 hrs)

MPF Humanities courses that also fulfill CAS-B:

  1. BWS 224, 225; HST 111, 112, 121, 122, 197, 198, 224, 225, 296
  2. CHI 255; CLS 121; ENG 121, 122, 123, 124,125,131, 132, 133, 134, 141, 142, 143, 144, 161, 162, 163, 252, 254, 255, 271; FRE 131; GER 161, 231, 251, 252; JPN 231, 255; LAS 254;
    RUS 137, 255; SPN 315
  3. PHL 101, 103, 104, 105, 131
  4. REL 101, 102, 103, 175, 213
    Additional Hours: AMS 205; COM 135, 206, 281; ENG 171, 202, 238; FST 201; GER 151; IMS 238; ITL 221

CAS-B Humanities (9 hrs)
•  Take 6 hours from two of the following four areas in the College:
1. History – any HST course; CLS 101, 102
2. Literature – any CAS-B Lit course in ENG, CLS, THE, or foreign language course
3. Philosophy – any PHL course except 161, 273, 373
4. Religion – any REL course
• Take additional 3 hours from any of the areas above or the following MPF courses: AMS 205, 222; ARC 188; ART 185, 186, 187, 188, 280; COM 135, 206, 247, 281; ENG 171, 202, 238; FST 201, 206, 222; GER 151; IDS 238; ITL 221, 222; JRN 101; LAS 260; MUS 185, 189

C. Social Science
(at least 3 hrs)

MPF Social Science courses that also fulfill CAS-C:
1. ATH 155, 175, 185
2. ECO 201, 202
3. GEO 101, 111, 201
4. POL 101, 102, 142, 159
5. PSY 111
6. SOC 141, 151, 152; GTY 154

Additional Hours:
BWS 151; COM 134, 136, 143; EDP 101, 201; FSW 160;
ITS 201; KNH 276; SPA 127, 211, 223; WMS 201

CAS-C Social Science (9 hrs)
• Take 6 hours from two of the following six areas in the College:
1. Anthropology – any ATH course
2. Economics – any ECO course
3. Geography – any GEO course, except GEO 121, 424, 431, 432
4. Political Science – any POL course
5. Psychology – any PSY course
6. Sociology & Gerontology – any SOC or GTY course
• Take additional 3 hours from any of the areas above or the following MPF courses: BWS 151; COM 134,136,143; EDP 101, 201; FSW 160; ITS 201, 208; KNH 276; LAS 207, 208; SPA 127, 211, 223; WMS 201
III. Cultures (6 hrs) Note: Choose MPF III (U.S. Cultures/World Cultures) courses to fulfill CAS-B and CAS-C
A. United States (3 hrs) MPF U.S. Cultures courses that also fulfill CAS-B:
AMS 205; COM 206, 247, 281; DST 247; ENG 162, 202, 246, 247, 248, 254, 271; FST 206, 222; GER 151; HST 111, 112, 260; IDS 206; ITL 222; LAS 254, 260
MPF U.S. Cultures courses that also fulfill CAS-C:
ATH 185; BWS 151; ECO 131; GEO 201; POL 142, 159; PSY 210; SOC 141, 152; SPA 211; WMS 201
B. World (3 hrs) MPF World Cultures courses that also fulfill CAS-B:
ART 185, 186, 279; BWS 224, 225; CHI 251, 252, 255; CLS 101,102; ENG 168; GER 161, 231, 251, 252, 321, 322; HST 121, 122, 197, 198, 207, 208, 209, 224, 225, 296; ITL 221; JPN 231, 255, 279; MUS 185; PHL 106, 161; REL 207, 209, 279; RUS 137
MPF World Cultures courses that also fulfill CAS-A: FRE 202
MPF World Cultures courses that also fulfill CAS-C:
ATH 175, 206, 207, 209; BWS 209; GEO 101,111, 207, 208, 209; ITS 201, 208; LAS 207, 208; POL 208, 230; SOC 208
IV. Natural Science (9 hrs, including a lab) MPF Natural Science courses that also fulfill CAS-D; courses in parentheses ( ) are lab courses: CAS-D Natural Science (10 hrs, including a lab)
A. Biological Science
(at least 3 hrs)
Biological Science:
BOT (115), (116),131, (155), 171, (191); MBI 111, (115), (116), 121, (123), 131, (143), (161); ZOO (113), (114), (115), (116), 121, (161), (171)
• Take 3 hours from courses in the College in the biological sciences (Any course in BOT, MBI, ZOO; or GEO 431, 432)
B. Physical Science
(at least 3 hrs)
Physical Science:
AER 101, 118; CHM (111), (131), 137, 141, (144), (153); GEO (121); GLG 111, (115L),121, 141; PHY 101, (103), 111, 118, 121, 131, 141,181, 182, (183), (184)

• Take 3 hours from courses in the College in the physical sciences (Any course in CHM, GLG, PHY; or AER 101, 118; GEO 121, 424)
• Take additional hours from either category above; one course must be, or include, a lab designated as CAS-D/LAB in the Bulletin.

V. Mathematics, Formal
Reasoning, and
Technology (3 hrs)
MPF Mathematics, Formal Reasoning, and Technology courses that also fulfill CAS-E: ATH 309; ENG 303; GER 309; MTH 121, 151, 153, 249; PHL 273; SPN 303; STA 261 CAS-E Formal Reasoning (3 hours)
• Take 3 hours within the College of Arts and Science from the list to the left, or PHL 373

Historical Perspective Course
Focus: =12 hours (Thematic Sequence = 9 hours; Senior Year Capstone Experience: 3 hours)

Advanced hours (200 level and above): 56 hours minimum
Hours in the major: 24 hours minimum; some departments require more

TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 128 hours (minimum)
GRADE POINT AVERAGE REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 2.00 cumulative; 2.00 average for courses in department of major

Basic Requirements: Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

Miami Plan (MP)

  • English Composition: 6
  • Fine Arts, Humanities, Social Science: 12
  • United States and World Cultures: 6
  • Natural Science: 9
  • Mathematics, Formal Reasoning, Technology Perspectives (Historical): 3
  • Focus: 12

College of Arts and Science (CAS)

  • CAS-A, Foreign Language: 0-14
    (See chart on preceding page.)

    In addition, B.S. students only: passing a reading examination in a foreign language over suitable material from within student's discipline.
  • Advanced hours (those at 200-level and above): 56 minimum
  • Hours in the major: 24 minimum; some departments require more
  • TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 128 (minimum)
  • GRADE POINT AVERAGE REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 2.00 cumulative and 2.00 in all courses taken in your department of major

Area of Major

In order for you to understand these areas and how they pertain to the College requirement, we list below all majors in Arts and Science and which area the major is in:

Humanities Social Science Natural Science
American studies Anthropology Biochemistry
Black world studies Diplomacy and foreign affairs Botany
Classical humanities Economics Chemistry
Classical languages and cultures Geography Clinical laboratory science
East Asian languages and cultures Gerontology Engineering physics
English (all major programs) Mass communication Geology
French Political science Mathematics and statistics
German Psychology Microbiology
History Public administration Physics
International studies Sociology Zoology
Italian Studies Speech communication  
Latin American studies Speech pathology and audiology  
Linguistics Strategic communication  
Philosophy Urban and regional planning  
Religion Women's studies  
Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies    
Spanish    

Departmental Honors

The College offers a program in departmental honors for students who qualify for and desire independent work in a major field of study under the guidance of a faculty mentor(s). Students who successfully complete such an effort graduate with a departmental honors notation on their transcripts and under their names in the commencement program.

To qualify for entrance into the departmental honors program, you must be a senior, a major in the College of Arts and Science, and have a grade point average of at least 3.50 in the major in which departmental honors work is desired. You must meet specific requirements of the department or academic program in which honors work is to be done; you must consult with the appropriate department or program director about specific requirements.

Students who qualify, register for course 480 (include department abbreviation; for example, BOT 480): departmental honors (1-6, maximum 6) for a minimum total of 4 semester hours and a maximum total of 6 semester hours. These credits may be taken in one or more semesters of your senior year. Approvals of the department chair or program director and the faculty mentor of your honors work are required for registration.

Expectations are rigorous and demanding, but the nature of projects vary. Projects might involve independent readings, creative efforts, internships, or research, based in the laboratory, field, or library. The project must result in a tangible product, such as an examination, written report, paper or monograph, oral presentation, work of art, or documentary.

Departmental honors in the College may be coordinated and integrated with work for Senior Directed Study in the University Honors Program. A common project may serve both departmental honors and university honors but separate and distinct presentations must be made to the department or program and to the University Honors Program for evaluation to earn both honors notations.

Notes on Credit Restrictions

Before registering for your courses, you should keep in mind these restrictions on credit:

  • You may not earn credit for a lower-numbered course in a department if you have already taken a closely related, higher-numbered course for credit. For example, if you have passed French 201, 202, you cannot take French 101, 102 and receive credit for them.
  • Credit is not given for closely related courses in two or more divisions.
  • You cannot register for more than 20 hours in a semester except with the approval of the Dean.

Combined Programs

Combined programs require students to transfer to other institutions to complete professional training programs. These are also called 3+1 or 4+1 programs (three or four years here, one year at another institution) or 3-2 programs (three years here, two at another institution).

Please understand that in most cases we cannot guarantee your acceptance into a program at another institution.

Clinical Laboratory Science

Clinical laboratory scientists apply scientific background and skills to supervision and performance of diagnostic procedures to determine presence or absence of disease and to monitor response to treatment.

Miami offers two baccalaureate degree programs that include a 12-month laboratory "clinical year." In the 3+1 program, you take three years at Miami followed by an internship to receive a B.S. in clinical laboratory science. In the 4+1 program, you take four years at Miami to earn an A.B. or B.S. in zoology, chemistry, or microbiology, and then you enter the clinical year.

After completing either program, you are eligible to take national registry examinations. Please understand that Miami cannot guarantee your acceptance into a clinical year site.

3+1 Program

This program requires 96 pre-clinical year semester hours at Miami, 32 in advanced courses. You take an interdepartmental sequence of courses in chemistry, microbiology, and zoology. Specific requirements include: general microbiology, pathogenic microbiology,and immunology, a year of general chemistry and a year of organic chemistry (or organic chemistry and biochemistry), one year of general biology; a course in mathematics; competency in computer usage; and completion of a foreign language at second-year level.

You must have at least a 2.50 cumulative grade point average to be eligible for this program.

During your junior year, you must file a petition in the dean's office of the College of Arts and Science to be graduated in this program. When you apply for a clinical year at a hospital, you must have a letter of intent from the Registrar of Miami University.

During your clinical year, you will be registered for MBI 487-488-489 at Miami. These courses fulfill the Miami Plan Capstone Experience requirement. Clinical laboratory rotations and lecture series may include hematology, chemistry, bacteriology, immunology, virology, parasitology, and mycology along with electives such as laboratory management and forensics. After you complete your clinical year and certify this to the Office of the Registrar, you will be awarded the B.S. in clinical laboratory science.

Affiliated training hospitals for this program include The Cleveland Clinic; University of Cincinnati Hospital; Wright State University in Dayton; Southwest General Health Center near Cleveland; Children's Hospital Medical Center of Akron; St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Covington, Kentucky; Parkview Memorial Hospital in Fort Wayne, Indiana; and Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee; and St. John Health Laboratories in Michigan.

4+1 Program

For this program, you choose a major in chemistry, microbiology, or zoology and fulfill all departmental, Arts and Science, and Miami Plan requirements for the baccalaureate degree. Pre-clinical year course requirements are: a year of general chemistry, a year of organic chemistry (or organic chemistry and biochemistry), a year of introductory biology, and one course in mathematics and general microbiology.

During fall semester of your senior year, you apply to enter a clinical year program at any hospital approved by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences in the U.S.

For more information about either program in clinical laboratory science, see the program adviser in the Department of Microbiology.

Engineering

Students desiring an engineering degree from another school in addition to a Miami degree may arrange either A.B. or B.S. 3-2 programs with any engineering school.

A.B. requirements for the 3-2 program are in the next section under Arts-Professional Arrangement. B.S. requirements for the 3-2 program are equivalent to these, except for deletion of the A.B. College of Arts and Science Requirement sections A through E, inclusion of the B.S. College of Arts and Science Requirement section A, and substitution of an appropriate B.S. curriculum instead of an A.B. curriculum. Completion of the 3-2 engineering program satisfies the Miami Plan Capstone Experience requirement.

At Miami your major requirements must be completed unless they are continued in engineering school by recommendation of the major professor and approval of the Committee of Advisers. In particular, you may wish to major in engineering physics, a program described in this chapter with the College's major programs.

Miami has cooperative arrangements with Case Western Reserve University, Columbia University, and Washington University (St. Louis), so that any student satisfying the appropriate 3-2 program requirements will be accepted by Case, Columbia, or Washington University and will receive the Miami degree (A.B. or B.S.) upon receiving the engineering bachelor's degree or sooner.

Environmental Management and Forestry

Miami has a cooperative agreement with Duke University School of the Environment, which allows students to attend Miami for three years and Duke for two years. You receive a B.S. in Botany from Miami and either a Master's in Forestry (M.F.) or a Master's in Environmental Management (M.E.M.) from Duke.

Miami students accepted by Duke can enter the professional master's degree programs at the end of the junior year. Your Miami degree (B.S.) is granted after your first year at Duke when Miami's requirements are met.

Basic requirements for recommendation to Duke's programs are 96 semester hours at Miami, including 32 at or above the 200 level, a cumulative grade point average of 2.50, and completion of both the Miami Plan and College of Arts and Science Requirement A (foreign language).

In the first semester of your junior year, you must file a petition with the College of Arts and Science to request a recommendation for the program, and you must apply to Duke for admission. Deadline is February 1 for fall admission and October 15 for winter admission. Duke also requires the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) for admission. You should arrange to take this test the first semester of your junior year.

Courses required for the three years of study at Miami are:

Departmental Requirements (24 hours, 14 must be advanced hours)
BOT 115 and 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4) or
       BOT 191 General Botany (4) plus BOT 116 (4) or ZOO 114 (4)
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity (4)

Related Hours
ECO 201
MTH 151, 251, or 249
STA 261
Thematic Sequence in chemistry (18 hours)

Recommended Electives
CSA 163, 253, 283
ENG 215, 313
GEO 341, 437, 447, 448
GLG 111, 115.L
IES 431, 450
PHY 171, 172, 181, 182
POL 261, 362

Environmental Principles and Practice Co-Major

The environmental principles and practice co-major emphasizes human-nature interaction in understanding environmental patterns and processes. Students are prepared to pursue a wide variety of career paths and post-graduate degrees in environmental science, especially those with management and policy specializations. The term "co-major" indicates that students must complete another major at Miami University. The environmental principles and practice co-major complements the primary major, which provides significant depth and breadth in an academic discipline. There is no specific degree designation for the co-major, students receive the degree designation of their primary major.

Environmental Science Co-Major

The environmental science co-major emphasizes earth science and life science approaches to understanding environmental patterns and processes. Students are prepared to pursue a wide variety of career paths and post-graduate degrees in environmental science, especially those with biological and physical science specializations. The term "co-major" indicates that students must complete another major at Miami University. The environmental science co-major complements the primary major, which provides significant depth and breadth in an academic discipline. There is no specific degree designation for the co-major, students receive the degree designation of their primary major.

Interactive Media Studies Co-Major

The co-major in interactive media studies is an interdisciplinary major that is designed to complement the traditional disciplinary-focused major. (It cannot be taken independently of a disciplinary focus). This co-major includes courses that span across the breadth of Miami University's offerings. From art to the humanities to computer science, the IMS co-major brings the inherently interdisciplinary world of technology to the traditionally disciplined student. There are four concentrations within the co-major that allow students to focus their experience on a particular area of interactive media, and to better complement their disciplinary area of focus. These concentrations include:

  • Digital Art and Design
  • Digital Game Studies
  • Digital Humanities and Social Science
  • Self-Designed (adviser approval required)

An application and "portfolio" are required for admittance. There is a minimum 2.50 g.p.a. requirement and a limited number of students are admitted each year.

Arts-Professional Arrangement

In addition to the combined programs above, we offer the Arts-Professional Arrangement as another way to earn a professional degree in less than normal time. This arrangement is open only to students working for the Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) degree.

This program allows you to substitute your senior year at Miami with the first year of an accredited professional school. Schools include those in business administration, dentistry, engineering, forestry, law, medicine, nursing, public health, or theology.

The Miami A.B. is usually awarded at commencement following the first year in professional school. If you have not earned at least a 2.00 grade point average for your first year of professional school, your Miami degree will not be awarded until you have finished the professional degree.

To be graduated under the Arts-Professional Arrangement, these requirements must be met: you must earn at least 96 Miami semester hours, including 32 hours at 200 level or above, with a 3.00 grade point average; you must complete the Miami Plan requirements, the College Requirement, and all requirements of your major (except those that can be continued in professional school); and you must file a petition with the College of Arts and Science by the end of your junior year.

Students transferring to Miami at the end of their freshman year may petition for a reduction of the 96 Miami hours required for this program, as long as this reduction does not exceed 32 hours.

For more information, consult an adviser in the College of Arts and Science.

Geographic Information Science Certificate

This certificate program focuses on the theory and techniques of geographic information science (GISci.). GISci is a suite of techniques for collecting, analyzing, and communicating information about the Earth's surface through technologies such as geographic information systems, satellite and aerial imaging, and global positioning systems (GPS).

Program Requirements (18 semester hours)

All of these:
GEO 441 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 442 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 448 Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing (3)

One of these:
CSA 163 Introduction to Computer Concepts and Programming (3)
MIS 281 Application Development Tools and Environment (3)

One of these:
CIT 214 Database Design and Development (3)
MIS 302 Database Theory and Practice (3)

One of these:
GEO 340 Internship (min. 3)*
GEO 447 Aerial Photo Interpretation (4)
Any GEO course focusing on GIS or remote sensing techniques (3)

* with the expectation that the internship involves GIS.

Planning for Law School

Law school is a popular option for Arts and Science majors. More than 400 students applied to law school in 2006; about 76% gained admission to at least one institution.

Students interested in law school are encouraged to select a major that interests them. Regardless of the major you select, you should take courses that will enhance those skills that are necessary for success in law school.

According to the Law School Admission Council, "as long as [students] receive an education including critical analysis, logical reasoning, and written and oral expression, the range of acceptable college majors is very broad." To develop these very essential skills, students should consider taking courses in the humanities, such as political science or history (critical analysis), philosophy (logic), communication and English (oral/written communication), and math and science (analytical reasoning).

Most law schools have high standards for grade point average (g.p.a.) and Law School Admission Test (LSAT) scores. In fact, the median g.p.a. for students accepted to the top 25 percent of law schools exceeds 3.50. Similarly, the median LSAT score for these schools is 160 (120-180 scale). In addition to success in the classroom, participation in community service, student activities, leadership training and experience, and study abroad are a plus.

If you are interested in law school, you should contact a pre-law adviser in our Pre-Law Center as early in your college career as possible.

Planning for Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Schools

Most medical, dental, and veterinary schools limit admission requirements to allow for students from a variety of undergraduate programs. All schools recognize the desirability of a broad education that includes a strong foundation in natural sciences, the basis for study and practice of health professions; communication skills, essential for developing successful relationships with the public and professionals; and social sciences and humanities, in order to better understand yourself and others.

Therefore, you should follow an undergraduate program that is as broad and comprehensive as possible in order to prepare for a career in a people-oriented profession in a changing society. Pursuing a double major in sciences is not advised if it is done at the expense of obtaining a broad education.

Common admission requirements include two years of chemistry, two years of biology, one year of physics, and one year of English. However, requirements of schools may vary. You should therefore consider individual requirements of schools and plan your curriculum accordingly.

Students who plan to go to professional schools should see an academic adviser before taking any course on a credit/no-credit basis. In addition, using AP credit for classes required by professional schools is not recommended.
Many students planning to attend medical, dental, or veterinary school major in zoology, microbiology, chemistry or biochemistry.

A recommended program for your first year is:

BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4,4) or
ZOO 113, 114 (4,4), or
MTH 151, 251 (5,4)
CHM 141, 142 College Chemistry (3,3) or
CHM 137, 142 (4,3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2) or
CHM 153, 161 (2, 2)
ENG 111, 112 College Composition, Composition and Literature (3,3)
Electives (applying toward the College Requirement and Miami Plan)

Science courses are demanding and for many freshmen the first semester is a difficult period. Therefore, your electives should not be difficult courses for you.

During your sophomore and/or junior year, take organic chemistry and lab ( CHM 241, 242 and 244, 245 or 251, 252 and 254, 255) and physics and lab ( PHY 171, 172 and 183, 184 or 181, 182 and 183, 184). A year of biology (BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115, 116 or ZOO 113, 114) should be taken sometime during your first two years.

Medical schools require the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), dental schools require the Dental Admission Test (DAT), and most veterinary schools want the Graduate Record Exam. You are strongly urged to talk with a pre-professional adviser as early as possible in preparing for one of these careers.

For information, talk with one of our pre-medicine advisers in zoology or in chemistry and biochemistry, microbiology, physics, or psychology. Pre-dentistry and pre-veterinary advisers are also in zoology.

Planning for Optometry School

Typical admission requirements for optometry school include one year of English, one year of biology, two years of chemistry, one year of physics, one semester of mathematics (calculus and statistics), one semester of psychology, one year of social science, one semester of microbiology, and one or two semesters of physiology. Since specific requirements vary, you should contact schools where you may apply, and plan your curriculum accordingly. Most pre-optometry students major in zoology, chemistry, or microbiology.

Optometry schools require the Optometry Admission Test. It is available only online (www.opted.org/info_oat.cfm).

A recommended program for your first year is:

BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4)
CHM 137, 142 College Chemistry (4, 3) or CHM 141,142 (3, 3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
ENG 111, 112 College Composition, Composition and Literature (3, 3)
MTH 151 Calculus (5)
Electives (choose from CAS requirements and Miami Plan Foundation courses)

For more information, consult with the pre-optometry adviser in the Department of Zoology.

Planning for Pharmacy School

Because the Doctor of Pharmacy is now the only accredited degree for pharmacy, you should complete a bachelor's degree (usually in zoology, microbiology, or chemistry), or at least two years of prerequisite coursework, and apply to a Doctor of Pharmacy program.

Typical prerequisites for pharmacy school include course work in calculus; inorganic, organic, and analytical chemistry; English, microbiology, physics, statistics, and zoology. Since specific requirements vary, contact schools of interest, and plan your curriculum accordingly. For more information, consult with the pre-pharmacy adviser in the Department of Zoology.

Planning for Physical Therapy School

If you are interested in a career in physical or occupational therapy, you should take courses that meet the prerequisites for graduate degree programs in those areas. The Pre-Physical and Pre-Occupational Therapy Program at Miami is designed to provide students with the basic science and related courses needed for background preparation and admission into an accredited physical or occupational therapy program.

The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) has announced that all physical therapy programs must offer doctoral degrees by 2020. According to the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), all baccalaureate occupational therapy programs nationwide are expected to transition to master's degree granting programs by 2007. Therefore, students interested in physical or occupational therapy usually complete their bachelor's degree at Miami and then apply to a master's or doctoral degree program in physical or occupational therapy at another school.

Because there is no standard set of prerequisite courses required by physical or occupational therapy programs, you must contact schools for their requirements. Select courses at Miami that will meet requirements for your program.

The following courses are required prior to admission by most programs (note that this is only a general guideline):
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (4) or ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4)
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts (4) or ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4)
CHM 137, 142 College Chemistry (4, 3) or CHM 141, 142 (3,3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2) or CHM 153, 161
ENG 111 or 112 English Composition (3, 3)
KNH 244, 244L Functional Anatomy and Lab (3,1)
KNH 381 Biodynamics of Human Activity (4)
KNH 468 Physiology and Biophysics of Human Activity (3)
PHY 171, 172 College Physics (3, 3)
PHY 183, 184 Physics Laboratory (1,1)
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4)
PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
ZOO 201 Comparative Anatomy (4) (meets human anatomy prerequisite)
ZOO 305 Animal Physiology (4) or
        ZOO 161 Principles of Human Physiology (4) (meets human physiology prerequisite)

Other suggested courses include:
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4)
CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (4)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
PHL 131 (3) or PHL 375 (4) or SOC 357 (3) (one semester of philosophy/medical ethics)

For more information, contact a physical therapy program adviser in the Department of Zoology or the Department of Kinesiology and Health.

Special Interest Areas

If you are interested in one of these areas, we suggest you look into the Arts and Science degree program(s) listed beside it.

 

Area Arts and Science Major
Advertising English, mass communication,
speech communication
Archaeology Anthropology, classics, geology, religion
Bacteriology Microbiology
Biology Botany, microbiology, zoology
City planning Urban and regional planning
Creative writing English/creative writing
Criminology Sociology, criminology minor
Environmental science Botany (environmental science emphasis*), geography, geology (environmental science emphasis*), zoology; environmental science co-major
Foreign affairs Diplomacy and foreign affairs, international studies, foreign languages
Forestry Botany; see also "Combined Programs"
Gerontology Gerontology, sociology
Government work Political science, diplomacy and foreign affairs, international studies, public administration, speech communication, urban and regional planning
Journalism Journalism, mass communication
Language Linguistics, speech pathology and audiology, foreign languages
Neuroscience Zoology, psychology
Personnel work Psychology, public administration, speech communication (organization communication concentration)
Pharmacy Chemistry, microbiology, zoology
Physical therapy Psychology, zoology
Public relations Strategic communication, journalism
Social work Sociology, psychology
Statistics Mathematics and statistics, statistics
Television and radio Mass communication


* Miami has a graduate degree program in environmental science. See the Graduate Bulletin for more information

Teacher Licensure

Combining a teacher licensure program with a major in the College of Arts and Science makes a student eligible for two degrees: an A.B. or B.S. degree in the College of Arts and Science and a B.S. in Education degree in the School of Education, Health and Society. Students who wish to combine licensure with an arts and science major must observe rules, procedures, and restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort.

If you choose to earn two degrees, you must meet all requirements for the Miami Plan, the College of Arts and Science, and teacher licensure. Early in your program you should plan your schedule with academic advisers from both the College of Arts and Science and the School of Education, Health and Society.

The following departments offer the possibility of combining the teacher licensure program with an Arts and Science major: botany, chemistry, classical languages, economics, English, French, geography, geology, German, history, mathematics, physics, political science, Spanish, and zoology.

For information, contact the Department of Teacher Education in the School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6443).

Major Requirements: College of Arts and Science

American Studies: Bachelor of Arts

Note: Changes to this program are being considered as this Bulletin goes to press, please consult the director of American Studies Program, 120 MacMillan Hall (513-529-5333).

This program is for students interested in the study of culture in the United States from an interdisciplinary perspective. Drawing from a range of disciplines and approaches, students have the opportunity to explore issues of political, social, and regional identity, cultural diversity, and national character, as well as public and popular culture as they have evolved from the colonial period to the present. The major encourages the study of the complex modern society of the United States as a whole, and at the same time allows students to pursue their particular interests by developing an area of concentration within the field. These concentrations might focus on historical moments, geographical regions, or social groups; or modes of thinking, expression or behavior, as well as public history and museum studies. Students are able to work with the program director to define their own program of study and combine courses in creative ways. For a complete list of courses that fulfill requirements, please contact the director.

Program Requirements (34 semester hours)

Core courses (16 hours)
AMS 205 Introduction to American Studies (3)
AMS 206 Approaches to American Studies (3)
AMS 301 Practice in American Studies (3)
AMS 302 The United States and the World (3)
AMS 401 Capstone in American Studies (4)

Areas of Concentration (18 hours)
Students must select and take 18 credit hours with at least 12 hours at the 200 level and above, incorporating at least three different disciplines from one of the areas of concentration shown below. A comprehensive list of courses in each of these areas is posted on the AMS website and is also available in pamphlet form at the Programs Office.

American Institutions, Ideas, and Experiences: This area of concentration focuses on the core institutions, ideas, and expressions that define America as a nation. It provides a traditional American Studies track.

Diversity and Difference: This area of concentration focuses on the diversity of cultures that come together in the United States, addressing issues of race, gender, class, religion, ethnicity, sexual identity, and other social categories. It provides the equivalent of an ethnic studies track.

Popular Culture, Media, Consumerism: This area of concentration focuses on consumer culture, popular culture, and mass media.

Public Culture and Civic Engagement: This area of concentration focuses on the practices and activities of civic engagement, the construction of shared identity and public memory, and the interpretation, presentation, and preservation of cultural resources.

Student Designed Area of Concentration: (developed in consultation with an adviser) This area of concentration allows a student to work with a faculty adviser to develop an individualized area of concentration in American culture. The proposed concentration needs to be approved by the director of the American Studies Program before course work is initiated.

Anthropology: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Anthropology, 164 Upham Hall (513-529-8399).

The major in anthropology exposes students to the field as a whole. At the same time, you have the opportunity to pursue individual interests.

Program Requirements (36 semester hours)

Core courses. All of these:
ATH 155 Introduction to Anthropology (4)
ATH 212 Introduction to Archaeological Theory and Methods (3)
ATH 231 Perspectives on Culture (3)
ATH 255 Foundations of Biological Anthropology (3)
ATH 265 Language and Culture (3)
ATH 421 Senior Seminar in Anthropology (3)

Electives. Seventeen (17) semester hours from these four categories; at least 12 hours from two of the four categories:
Cultural anthropology
ATH 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
ATH 303 Native American Cultures (4)
ATH 304 Contemporary Issues in Native American Life (3)
ATH 305 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America (3)
ATH 306 Peoples and Cultures of Russia (3)
ATH 307 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3)
ATH 325 Identity, Race, and Gender (3)
ATH 329 Religions of Africa (3)
ATH 331 Social Anthropology (3)
ATH 348 Culture, Illness, and Healing (3)
ATH 358 Travelers, Migrants and Refugees (3)
ATH 384 Anthropology of Capitalism: Russia (3)
ATH 388 Culture, Art, and Artifact (3)
ATH 402 Anthropology of the American Circus (3)
ATH 403 Anthropology of Religion (3)
ATH 411 Applied Anthropology (3)
ATH 425 Ethnographic Field Methods (3)
ATH 426 Ethnographic Field Research (4-16)
ATH 428 Anthropology of Women's Health (3)
ATH 431 Origins of the State (3)
ATH 432 Social Identities (3)
ATH 441 Museum Development, Philosophy, and Social Context (3)
ATH 443 The Museum Exhibit (3)
ATH 444 Museum Collections Management and Conservation (3)
ATH 471 Ecological Anthropology (3)
ATH 476 Environment and Aging (3)
ATH 484 Beyond the Field Experience: Processing Cultural Adjustments (3)

Biological anthropology
ATH 355 Fossil Evidence for Human Evolution (3)
ATH 395 Primate Biology and Behavior (3)
ATH 455 Heredity, Environment, and Human Society (3)
ATH 496 Observing Primate Behavior (4)
ATH 497 Socio-Ecology of Primates (3)
ATH 498 Evolution of Human Behavior (3)

Archaeology
ATH 312 Introduction to North American Archaeology (4)
ATH 313 Introduction to South American Archaeology (4)
ATH 314 Introduction to North American Archaeology (4)
ATH 351 Archaeological Field Methods (8)
ATH 414 Caribbean Archaeology (3)
ATH 415 Caribbean Archaeology Field and Laboratory Methods (6)
ATH 416 Archaeological Site Analysis (3)

Linguistic anthropology
ATH 309 Introduction to Linguistics (4)
ATH 364 Language and Culture in Native North America (3)
ATH 366 African Oral Traditions (3)
ATH 465/565 Seminar in Linguistic Anthropology (3)

Related Hours (16 required)
Any course at 200 level or above from: botany, classics, comparative religion, geography, geology, history, microbiology, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and zoology. Other courses may be petitioned through the chief departmental adviser in anthropology.

Special Curriculum Requirements
No more than four hours in field methods courses (e.g. ATH 351; ATH 415; ATH 426) and no more than six hours in variable content courses (ATH 177, 277, 377, 390, 477) can fill your electives requirement.
ATH 175, 185, 206, 207, or 209 do not count toward the major.

You must pass a methods course; this requirement is filled by:
ATH 351 Archaeological Field Methods (8)
ATH 415 Caribbean Archaeology Field and Laboratory Methods (6)
ATH 416 Archaeological Site Analysis (3)
ATH 425 Ethnographic Field Methods (3)
ATH 426 Ethnographic Field Research (4-16)
ATH 443 The Museum Exhibit (3)
ATH 444 Museum Collections Management and Conservation (3)
ATH 496 Observing Primate Behavior (4)

Courses outside anthropology may be used for this requirement but they will not count toward required hours for the major. Among courses you may use for a methods course are: SOC 262 Research Methods (4) or STA 261 Statistics (4)

Biochemistry: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 160 Hughes Laboratories (513-529-2813).

This program is for students interested in a career in the life or health sciences or biochemistry. Students who anticipate graduate study in biochemistry should elect the B.S. Biochemistry program. Chemistry and required related courses cannot be taken on a credit/no-credit basis.

Program Requirements (35-36 semester hours)

All of these:
CHM 141,142 College Chemistry (3, 3)
CHM 144,145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
CHM 147 Introductory Seminar (1)
CHM 251, 252 Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors (3, 3) or
        CHM 241, 242 Organic Chemistry (3, 3) and
        CHM 244, 245 Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
CHM 363 Analytical Chemistry (3)
CHM 432 Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4)
CHM 438 Biochemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 471, 472 Physical Chemistry (3, 3)

Related Hours (26-28 required)

All of these:
MTH 151, 251 Calculus I, II (5, 4) or equivalents
PHY 181 General Physics (4)
PHY 183 General Physics Laboratory (1)

One of these:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts (4)
BOT 191 General Botany (4)
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4)

One of these:
Any course at the 300 level or above in BOT, MBI, or ZOO
CHM 364 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 417 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)
CHM 426 Spectroscopic Identification of Structure (3)

Additional courses from the above category or PHY 182,184 The Physical World/Physics Lab (4,1) to reach 26 hours. Note: pre-medicine students must take PHY 182,184.

Biochemistry: Bachelor of Science

For information contact the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 160 Hughes Laboratories (513-529-2813).

This major is usually chosen by students who want to enter the chemical industry or graduate school in chemistry, biochemistry, or related areas. No chemistry or required related courses may be taken credit/no-credit.

Program Requirements (40-44 semester hours)

All of these:
CHM 141,142 College Chemistry (3,3)
CHM 153 General Chemistry Laboratory (2) or
        CHM 144 College Chemistry Laboratory (1) (with approval)
CHM 147 Introductory Seminar (1)
CHM 161 Quantitative Analysis (2) or
       CHM 145H College Chemistry Laboratory (Honors) (2)
CHM 251, 252 Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors (3, 3)
CHM 254, 255 Organic Chemistry Laboratory for Chemistry Majors (3, 2)
CHM 351, 472 Physical Chemistry (3,3)
CHM 433, 434 Biochemistry (3, 3)
CHM 438 Biochemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 454 Instrumental Analysis (3)
One semester hour of laboratory from these: CHM 340418, 455, 477, 490; MBI 465; or ZOO 443.

Related Hours (40 required)

All of these:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4)
MTH 151, 251, 252 Calculus I, II, III (5, 4, 4) or equivalents
PHY 181, 182 General Physics (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 General Physics Laboratory (1, 1)

One course from each of these three groups:
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3) or
        MTH 231 Elements of Discrete Mathematics (3) or
        MTH 347 Differential Equations (4) or
        STA 301 Applied Statistics (4) or
        STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
BOT 342 Genetics (3) or
        MBI 445 Microbial Genetics (2) or
        ZOO 342 Genetics (3)
BOT 203 Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4) or
        ZOO 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3) or
        ZOO 443 Cell Biology (4)

Biology: See Botany, Microbiology, Zoology

Black World Studies: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the director of Black World Studies, 120 MacMillan Hall (513-529-1235).

Black World Studies (BWS) is an interdisciplinary program that offers a unique opportunity for all undergraduate students to gain a better understanding of the historical, social, religious, cultural political experiences, values and expressions of Africans and people of African descent in the U.S. and throughout the world. If focuses on changing constructions of race, class, and gender in local and global contexts.

Program Requirements (38-40 semester hours)

  1. Take both of these:
            BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (4)
            BWS 156 Introduction to Africa (4)
  2. Take a minimum of two courses from Areas A and B (total of four courses), and a minimum of one course from areas C and D (total of two courses).
  3. Choose any four additional courses from the lists below.

Area A. African Experiences and Cultures
Two of these:
ART 480 Seminar in African Art (3)
ATH 329 Religions of Africa (3)
BOT 496 Biodiversity of Kenya (5)
BWS/GEO/HST/ REL 209 Civilizations of Africa (3)
BWS/ HST 224 Africa to 1884 (3)
BWS/ HST 225 The Making of Modern Africa (3)
BWS/ FST 267 National Cinemas: African Film (3)
BWS/ GEO 301 Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (4)
BWS/ CLS 310E Identity and Cultural Difference in Greco-Roman Egypt (3)
BWS 324/ HST 325 Images of Africa (3)
BWS 339 / POL 338 Contemporary African Politics (3)
BWS/ ATH 366 African Oral Traditions (3)
BWS 370 Selected Topics: Black World Studies (3)
BWS/POL 370B African Politics and Society Through Literature (3)
BWS/ENG/FST/ POR 381 African Lusophone Literature (3)
BWS/ENG 450A Studies in Genre: The African Noel (3)
BWS/ HST 495 Modern African Environmental History (3)
BWS/ HST 496 Africa in the 20th Century: Decolonialization and Independence (3)
HST 444 Ancient Egypt (3)
POL 438 Africa in the Global Economy (3)

Area B. African American Experiences and Cultures
Two of these:

ART 235 The Gods Are Here (3)
BWS/ HST 221 African American History (3)
BWS 250C African American Education (3)
BWS/ KNH 279 African Americans in Sports (3)
BWS/ KNH 292 Dance, Culture, and Contexts (3)
BWS/ ENG 336 African American Writing (3)
BWS/ ENG 337 African American Writing 1878-1945 (3)
BWS/ ENG 338 African American Writing 1946-Present (3)
BWS/ HST 365 Civil War and Reconstruction Era (3)
BWS/ HST 395 The American South to 1877 (3)
BWS/ HST 396 The American South Since 1877 (3)
BWS/ SOC 448 The African American Experience (3)
ENG 271 Cultures and Literatures of the American South (3)
ENG 348 Ethnic American Literatures (3)
HST 329 Lynching in America 1865-1940
MUS 135 Understanding Jazz, Its History and Context (3)
MUS 285 Survey of African Music in the Diaspora (3)
MUS 385 The Roots of Black Music: Blues, Gospel, and Soul (3)
MUS 386 The History and Development of Hip-Hop Culture in America (3)
REL 343 African American Religions (3)

Area C. Afro-Latin and Afro-Caribbean Experiences
One of these:
BWS/ POR 383 By- or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women (3)
BWS/ LAS 415 Cuba in Revolution: Its History, Politics, and Culture (4)
ENG/ LAS 254 Latin American Literature (3)
GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3)
GEO 461 Migrants and Diasporas (3)
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization (3)

Area D. Perspectives on Gender, Race, Class, and Ethnicity
One of these:

BWS/ CLS 210R Race and Ethnicity (3)
BWS/ KNH 292 Dance, Culture and Contexts (3)
BWS/ ATH 325 Identity, Race, Gender, Class (3)
BWS 326 Islam in History (3)
BWS/ SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
BWS/ FSW 362 Family and Poverty (3)
BWS/ WMS 370E Feminism and Diaspora: U.S. Women of Color (3)
BWS 380J Black Atlantic: Crosscurrents of Resistance (3)
BWS/ HST 386 Race in U.S. Society (3)
BWS/ WMS 410A/ENG 470A Black Feminist Theory (3)
BWS/ ARC 427 The American City Since 1940 (3)
BWS 433 African American Psychology (3)
BWS/ SOC 448 The African American Experience (3)
BWS/ GEO 455 Race, Urban Change, and Conflict in America (3)
BWS 470 Social and Political Activism (3)
BWS/ GTY 472 Minority Aging (3)
BWS 492 African and African American Sexuality (3)
KNH 386 African Americans and Health Issues (3)
POL 142 American Politics and Diversity (4)
PSY 325 Psychology of Prejudice and Minority Experience (3)
REL 241 Religions of the American People (4)
SOC 372 Social Stratification (3)
SOC 490 Critical Race Theory
WMS 370A Black Women Writers (3)

Botany: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Botany, 316 Pearson Hall (513-529-4200).

Program Requirements
(30 semester hours, 18 must be advanced hours)

One group from these:
BOT 115 and 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4) or
        BOT 191 General Botany (4) and either BOT 116 (4) or ZOO 114 (4)

Both of these:
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4)

At least two (more recommended) of these:
BOT 205 Dendrology (4)
BOT 302 Plant Taxonomy (4)
BOT 312 Plant and Fungal Diversity (4)
BOT 342 Genetics (3)
BOT 401 Plant Ecology (3)
BOT 402 Plant Anatomy (3)
BOT 403 Plant Development (3)
BOT 409 Morphology of Vascular Plants (4)
BOT 421 Advanced Mycology (3)
BOT 425 Plant Physiology (4)
Note: No more than six hours of BOT 131, 155, or 171 may count toward the major.
No more than four hours of research/internship may count toward the major.

Related Hours (12 required)
CHM 131 Chemistry of Life Processes (4) or
        CHM 137 or 141 College Chemistry (4, 3) and
        CHM 144 College Chemistry Laboratory (2) and
other courses from the departments of Computer Science and Systems Analysis,
Geography, Geology, Mathematics (151, 251, or 252 recommended), Physics, or Statistics.

Note: For graduate study in biological sciences, most programs require organic chemistry, many require calculus and/or statistics, and some require a physics sequence.

Program Requirements: Environmental Science Emphasis
(30 semester hours, 18 must be advanced hours)

All of these:
BOT 115 and 116 Biological Concepts (MPF; 116 is also MPT)(4, 4) or
        BOT 191 General Botany (MPF, MPT) (4) and BOT 116 (4) or ZOO 114 (4)
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (MPT) (4)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (MPT) (4)
BOT 401 Plant Ecology (MPT) (3)

At least one of these recommended courses:
BOT 205, 302, 312, 342, 402, 403, 409, 421, or 425,.

Required Related Hours:
Students in this major must satisfy the requirements of the Arts and Science Co-Major in Environmental Science. This co-major also fulfills the Thematic Sequence requirement.

Botany: Bachelor of Science

For information contact the Department of Botany, 316 Pearson Hall (513-529-4200).

There are three B.S. degree programs: the Basic Major, the major with Environmental Science Emphasis, and the major with Plant Biotechnology Emphasis.

Program Requirements: Basic Major
(40 semester hours, 28 must be advanced hours)

One group from these:
BOT 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4) or
BOT 191 General Botany (4) and BOT 116 (4) or ZOO 114 (4)

Both of these:
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4)

Take a minimum of four of these:
BOT 302 Plant Taxonomy (4)
BOT 312 Plant and Fungal Diversity (4)
BOT 342 Genetics (3)
BOT 401 Plant Ecology (3)
BOT 402 Plant Anatomy (3)
BOT 403 Plant Development (3)
BOT 409 Morphology of Vascular Plants (4)
BOT 421 Advanced Mycology (3)
BOT 425 Plant Physiology (4)
Any BOT 600-level course

Also required: Other BOT courses to total at least 40 hours

Note: No more than six hours of BOT 131, 155, or 171 may count toward this major.
No more than six hours of research/internship may count toward the major.

Related Hours (32 hours required)

Thematic Sequence in chemistry (18 hours)
All of these:
PHY 171, 172 College Physics (3, 3) or
        PHY 181, 182 The Physical World (4, 4) and
        PHY 183, 184 Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
STA 261 Statistics (4) or
        STA 301 Applied Statistics (3) or
        MTH 151 Calculus I (5) or
        MTH 251 Calculus II (4) or
        MTH 252 Calculus III (4) plus

Additional hours from these departments: Computer Science and Systems Analysis,
Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, or Statistics.

Program Requirements: Environmental Science Emphasis (34 semester hours, 26 must be advanced hours)

All of these:
BOT 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4) or
        BOT 191 General Botany (4) and BOT 116 (4) or ZOO 114 (4)
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4)
BOT 205 Dendrology (4) or
        BOT 302 Plant Taxonomy (4)
BOT 401 Plant Ecology (3)
BOT 425 Plant Physiology (4)
BOT 434 Plant Community Ecology Methods (1) or
        BOT 437 Field Methods in Population Ecology (1)

Other recommended courses to total 34 hours:
BOT 351, 431, 432, 434, 437, 467

Note: No more than six hours of research/internship may count toward the major.

Required Related Hours (37-39 required)

Thematic Sequence in Chemistry (18 hours)
Complete the environmental science co-major.

Note: Most graduate programs in botany or biology require organic chemistry. Many also require calculus and/or statistics, and some require general physics.

Program Requirements: Plant Biotechnology Emphasis
(34 semester hours, 26 must be advanced hours)

All of these:
BOT 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4) or
BOT 191 General Botany (4) and BOT 116 (4) or ZOO 144 (4)
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4)
BOT 255 Introduction to Biotechnology (3)
BOT 342 Genetics (3)
BOT 415 Techniques in Plant Biotechnology
Other recommended courses to total 34 hours: BOT 424, 425, 466

Required Related Hours (36 Hours)

All of these:
Thematic Sequence in Chemistry (18)
Minor in Molecular Biology (18)

Chemistry: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 160 Hughes Laboratories (513-529-2813).

This program is for students interested in a career in the life or health sciences, physical sciences related to chemistry, or in teaching chemistry in secondary school. Students who anticipate graduate study in chemistry should elect the B.S. Chemistry Program. Chemistry or required related courses cannot be taken on a credit/no-credit basis.

Program Requirements (31 semester hours)

All of these:
CHM 141, 142 College Chemistry (3, 3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
CHM 147 Introductory Seminar (1)
CHM 251, 252 Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors (3, 3) or
CHM 241, 242 Organic Chemistry (3, 3)
CHM 244, 245 Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
CHM 363 Analytical Chemistry (3)
CHM 364 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 471, 472 Physical Chemistry (3, 3)

Related Hours (26-28 required)

All of these:
MTH 151, 251 Calculus I, II (5, 4) or equivalents
PHY 181, 182 General Physics (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 General Physics Laboratory (1, 1)

Additional science courses:
Nine credit hours at the 200 level or above in one of the following departments: botany, geology, microbiology, mathematics, physics, or zoology. Note: Pre-medicine students must take biological science courses.

Teaching licensure
Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter. For information contact the Office of Student Services in the School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6418).

Chemistry: Bachelor of Science

For information contact the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 160 Hughes Laboratories (513-529-2813).

This program is usually chosen by students who want to enter the chemical industry or graduate school in chemistry, biochemistry, or related areas. This program meets certification requirements of the American Chemical Society. Chemistry or required related courses cannot be taken on a credit/no-credit basis.

Program Requirements (43-46 semester hours)

All of these:
CHM 141, 142 College Chemistry (3, 3)
CHM 147 Introductory Seminar (1)
CHM 153 General Chemistry Laboratory (2) or, with approval:
CHM 144 College Chemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 161 Quantitative Analysis (2) or
CHM 145H College Chemistry Laboratory (Honors) (2)
CHM 251, 252 Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors (3, 3)
CHM 254, 255 Organic Chemistry Laboratory for Chemistry Majors (3, 2)
CHM 351, 352 Physical Chemistry for Chemistry Majors (3, 3)
CHM 417 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)
CHM 418 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 433 Biochemistry (3) or
CHM 432 Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4)
CHM 454 Instrumental Analysis (3)
CHM 455 Chemical Measurements I (2)
CHM 456 Chemical Measurements II (2)

One of these:
CHM 426 Spectroscopic Identification of Structure (2)
CHM 434 Biochemistry (3)
CHM 473 Exploring Chemistry With Quantum Methods (3)

Related Hours (29 required)

All of these:
MTH 151, 251, 252 Calculus I, II, III (5, 4, 4) or equivalents
PHY 181, 182 General Physics (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 General Physics Laboratory (1, 1)

One of these:
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 231 Elements of Discrete Mathematics (3)
MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (4)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)

Two additional credit hours of laboratory at the 200 level or higher in BOT, CHM, GLG, MBI, PHY, PCE, or ZOO. For lecture/lab courses, only lab credit hours count. May include undergraduate research, CHM 340U, 477, 490.

Classical Humanities: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Classics, 105 Irvin Hall (513-529-1480).

Classics is the study of literature, art, history, archaeology, philosophy, and languages of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Achievements of Greco-Roman civilization are important to study for their inherent power and beauty and for the extraordinary influence they have on cultures that followed. Study of the Greco-Roman world deepens your understanding of the origins of Western culture and offers alternatives to social, political, and cultural values of our world. This major gives you a broad spectrum of classical culture and civilization without primary emphasis on study in classical languages.

Graduate work in Classics, Greek, or Latin requires not only appropriate experience reading Greek and Latin, but a reading knowledge of French or German as well. Students planning to go to graduate school should consult with the department as early as possible to design an appropriate course of study.

Program Requirements (24 semester hours)

Two of these:
CLS 101 Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3)
CLS 102 Introduction to Roman Civilization (3)
CLS 121 Classical Mythology (3)

One of these:
ART 381 Greek and Roman Architecture (3)
ART 382 Greek and Roman Sculpture (3)
ART 383 Greek and Roman Painting (3)

One of these:
CLS 401 Age of Augustus (3)
CLS 402 Age of Pericles (3)

Choose remaining hours from these:
Any course in classical humanities
Any course in Greek or Latin beyond the first year

Related Hours (16 required)

Choose from such areas as anthropology, architecture, art, history, language, literature, philosophy, and religion to make up an integrated plan of study in classical humanities. Eight hours of Greek or Latin at the 100 level may be counted toward this requirement. You must obtain the written approval of your adviser for any related hours courses.

Knowledge of at least one other foreign language is recommended.

Classical Languages: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Classics, 105 Irvin Hall (513-529-1480).

This program is an in-depth study of classical culture possible only through the study of the classical language. The literature of ancient Greece, which encompasses epic, lyric, drama, history, rhetoric, and philosophy, established many key genres of literary expression for many centuries in European cultural tradition. Latin literature, forged both in imitation of and reaction against the riches of Greek culture, was the primary vehicle through which Europe acquired its notions of culture and many of its most persistent values.

Graduate work in classics, Greek, or Latin requires not only appropriate experience reading Greek and Latin, but a reading knowledge of German and French as well. Students planning to go to graduate school should consult with the department as early as possible to design an appropriate course of study.

Teacher Licensure

Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter. For information contact the Office of Student Services in the School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513) 529-6418.

Program Requirements (24 semester hours)

Any 24 semester hours in Latin and Greek language and literature at the 200 level or above. Greek 102, Latin 102, or Latin 121 can be counted toward the major provided you take at least one course in each language.

Related Hours (16 required)

CLS courses can count as related hours. Choose remaining hours from such areas as art, history, language, literature, philosophy and religion with an adviser to make up an integrated plan of study. You must obtain the written approval of your adviser for any related hours courses.

Knowledge of at least one other foreign language is recommended.

Clinical Laboratory Science: Bachelor of Science

For information contact the Department of Microbiology, 32 Pearson Hall (513-529-5422).

This program is for students who plan to be certified as clinical laboratory scientists by the National Certification Agency or as medical technologists by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

Special Curriculum Requirements

This program requires 128 semester hours. Required courses include a twelve month, 32 credit clinical laboratory internship. See program description in the Combined Programs section earlier in this chapter. No pre-internship science or related course may be taken on a credit/no-credit basis.

Program Requirements (80-82 semester hours)

All of these:
CHM 137 (4), or 141, 142 College Chemistry (3, 3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4) and CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry
       (4) or CHM 241, 242 Organic Chemistry (3, 3) and CHM 244, 245 Organic Chemistry
       Laboratory (2, 2)
MBI 115 Biological Concepts (4)
MBI 116 Biological Concepts (4)
MBI 201, 202 General Microbiology I, II (4, 4)
MBI 405 Pathogenic Microbiology (4)
MBI 415 Immunology Principles and Practice (4)
MBI 487, 488, 489 Clinical Laboratory Science Practicum (8,12,12)

Related Hours (13-17 required)

MTH 104 Pre-Calculus with Algebra (5)

At least two of these:
CHM 363, 364 Analytical Chemistry and Laboratory (3, 2)
MBI 435 Medical Mycology (3)
MBI 365 Molecular and Cellular Biology (3)
MBI 464 Human Viruses (3)
PHY 171 College Physics (3)

Communication: Bachelor of Arts

This department's majors are selective. For information contact the appropriate program area of the Department of Communication, 162 Bachelor Hall (513-529-7472).

Three majors and several context areas within these are offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts, major in mass communication. For more information, see mass communication later in this chapter and/or contact that area of the department.
  • Bachelor of Arts, major in speech communication. Areas of focus: organizational communication, rhetorical influence, and interpersonal/relational communication. For more information, see speech communication later in this chapter and/or contact that area of the department.
  • Bachelor of Arts, major in strategic communication. For more information, see strategic communication later in this chapter and/or contact that area of the department

Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Political Science, 218 Harrison Hall (513-529-2000).

This major is for students interested in international politics and those interested in international careers. Study abroad is very useful; students are urged to consider Miami's Dolibois European Center in Luxembourg, exchange programs, or summer overseas programs.

Fifteen of the 30 required semester hours in the department and 12 of the 21 related hours must be completed at Miami. Required political science and related hours may not be taken on a credit/no-credit basis. A g.p.a. of at least 2.00 must be attained for the required political science hours and required related hours.

Program Requirements

Political Science Courses (at least 30 semester hours)

All of these:
POL 221 Modern World Governments (4)
POL 271 World Politics (4)
POL 373 American Foreign Policy (3)

Foreign policy component. Two of these:
POL 374 Comparative Foreign Policies (3)
POL 375 International Relations of East Asia (3)
POL 376 U.S. National Security Policy (3)
POL 378 Latin America: The Region and the World (3)
POL 387 Comparative Security Issues (3)
POL 488 Russia and the Republics in International Relations (3)

Global politics component. Two of these:
POL 270 Current World Problems (3)
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Politics (3)
POL 339 Arab Nationalism in World Politics (3)
POL 346 Global Gender Politics (3)
POL 381 Global Governance (3)
POL 382 International Law (3)
POL 386 Global Competition (3)
POL 422 Democratization (3)

Regional politics component. Two of these:
POL 133 Imagining Russia (2)
POL 270L East-West Relations Since WWII (3)
POL 321L Comparative European Politics (4)
POL 331 Development of the Soviet Polity (3)
POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics (3)
POL 333 Politics of Western Europe (4)
POL 335 Politics of East Asia (4)
POL 336 Politics of the Middle East (3)
POL 337 Politics of Latin America (4)
POL 338 Contemporary African Politics (4)
POL 423 European Union: Politics and Policies (4)
POL 425 British and Irish Politics (3)
POL 430 Seminar on Comparative Political Systems (4)

Related Hours (21 semester hours required)

Economics. Both of these:
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)

Diplomatic history. One of these:
HST 222 U.S. Diplomatic History Since 1914 (3)
HST 275 20th Century European Diplomacy (3)
HST 332 Age of Dictators Europe 1914-1945 (3)
HST 333 Reconstruction of Europe Since 1945 (3)
HST 360C Alternatives to War in History (3)
HST 398 20th Century World History (3)
HST 431 The U.S. - Vietnam War (3)
HST 472 Germany: 1918 to 1945 (3)

World regions. One of these:
GEO 101 World Regional Geography (3)
GEO 301 Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (4)
GEO 304 Latin American Development (4)
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)
GEO 311 Geography of Western Europe (3)
GEO 405 Caribbean in Global Context (3)
HST 322 History of the Modern Middle East (3)
HST 325 Images of Africa (3)
HST 354 Modern Chinese History (3)
HST 356 Modern Japanese History (3)
HST 375 Russia and the USSR from 1855 to the Present (3)
HST 378 20th Century Eastern European History (3)
HST 495 Modern African Environmental History (3)
HST 496 Africa in the 20th Century: Decolonization and Independence (3)
LAS 208 Latin American Civilization (3)
SOC 337L Directed Research in European Studies (3 hrs. minimum)

International functional problems. Two of these:
ECO 341 Economic History of Modern Europe (3)
ECO 342 Comparative Economic Systems (3)
ECO 343 The Economy of Modern China (3)
ECO 344 International Economic Relations (3)
ECO 347 Economic Development (3)
ECO 441 International Trade and Commercial Policy (3)
ECO 442 International Monetary Relations (3)
GEO 101 Global Forces and Local Diversity (3)
GEO 211 Global Change (3)
GEO 378 Political Geography (4)
GEO 457 Global Cities, World Economy (3)
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment (3)
GEO 475 Third World Urbanization (3)
HST 326 Islam (3)
HST 343 Comparative Terrorism (3)
ITS 302 Problems of Non-Western Societies (3)
MKT 471 International Marketing (3)
POL 208 Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3)

Foreign language/mathematics/statistics. One of these:
Foreign language course (not in translation) 300 level or higher (3)
DSC 205 Business Statistics (4)
MTH 151 Calculus (5)
STA 261 Statistics (4)

For Foreign Service Exam, POL 241, upper-level courses in American politics, and electives in American studies and economics are recommended.

For graduate school, POL 241 and at least one course in political theory, research methods, and statistics are recommended.

For advanced professional degrees, electives from POL 241, law and American politics, accountancy, business, communications, and English are recommended.

East Asian Languages and Cultures: Bachelor of Arts

For information, contact the Department of German, Russian, and East Asian Languages, 172 Irvin Hall (513-529-2526).

This program provides intensive studies in the languages and cultures of East Asia, focusing on Japan and China. Students can choose from either the Japan Concentration, the China Concentration, or a combination.

Related hours which are requirements for the three cases provide a broadly based background for the three curricula. Study abroad is encouraged. Credits earned abroad may count toward the major.

Program Requirements: Japan Concentration*
(24 semester hours plus 15 related hours)

Required courses in Japanese (15 semester hours)
JPN 201, 202 Second Year Japanese (3,3)
JPN 301, 302 Third Year Japanese (3, 3)
JPN 401 Japanese Culture and Society in Contemporary Texts I (3)

Selected courses (9 semester hours):
JPN 231 Japanese Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3)
JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
JPN 260 Topics in Japanese Literature in English Translation (3)
JPN 266 Survey of Japanese Cinema: Japanese Film and Culture (3)
JPN 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (3)
JPN 381 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (3)
JPN 402 Japanese Culture and Society in Contemporary Texts II (3)
Note: These Selected courses may be used in Related hours if not used as Selected courses.

Related hours**

15 semester hours from the following including at
least one course from the Japan group:

Japan:
ARC 428 Japanese Architecture (3)
ART 479 Japanese Painting and Prints (3)
HST 356 Modern Japanese History (3)
SOC 408 Contemporary Japanese Society (3)

China:
ART 478 Chinese Painting History (3)
CHI 251 Traditional Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
CHI 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture in English Translation (3)
CHI 277W Chinese Culture Live (1-3)
CHI 402 Fourth Year Chinese (3)
HST 353 History of Chinese Civilization (3)
HST 354 Modern Chinese History (3)
HST/WMS 383 Women in Chinese History (3)
HST 400.6 Senior Capstone: Asian (3)
HST 434 China and the Silk Road:
       Patterns of China's Interactions with other Peoples before 1600 (3)
GEO 410D Regional Analysis of China (3)

East Asia:
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)
POL 335 Politics of China and Japan (4)
POL 375 International Relations of East Asia (3)
REL 324 Buddhism in China, Korea, and Japan (3)

Linguistics:
ATH/ GER 309 or ENG/ SPN 303 Introduction to Linguistics (4)

* A student who majors in East Asian Languages and Cultures (Japan concentration) may
not minor in Japanese.
** The Chinese minor will also satisfy this requirement

Program Requirements: China Concentration*
(24 semester hours plus 15 related hours)

Required courses in Chinese (15 semester hours)
CHI 201, 202 Second Year Japanese (3,3)
CHI 301, 302 Third Year Japanese (3, 3)
CHI 401 Fourth Year Chinese (3)

Selected courses (9 semester hours):
CHI 251 Traditional Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
CHI 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture in English Translation (3)
CHI 277W Chinese Culture Live (1-3)
CHI 402 Fourth Year Chinese (3)
Note: These Selected courses may be used in Related hours if not used as Selected courses.

Related hours**

(15 semester hours from the following including at least one course from the China group):

China:
ART 478 Chinese Painting History (3)
HST 353 History of Chinese Civilization (3)
HST 354 Modern Chinese History (3)
HST/WMS 383 Women in Chinese History (3)
HST 400.6 Senior Capstone: Asian History (3)
HST 434 China and the Silk Road:
       Patterns of China's Interactions with Other Peoples before 1600 (3)
GEO 410D Regional Analysis of China (3)

Japan:
ARC 428 Japanese Architecture (3)
ART 479 Japanese Painting and Prints (3)
HST 356 Modern Japanese History (3)
JPN 231 Japanese Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3)
JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
JPN 260 Topics in Japanese Literature in English Translation (3)
JPN 266 Survey of Japanese Cinema: Japanese Film and Culture (3)
JPN 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (3)
JPN 381 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (3)
JPN 402 Japanese Culture and Society in Contemporary Texts II (3)
SOC 408 Contemporary Japanese Society (3)

East Asia:
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)
POL 335 Politics of China and Japan (4)
POL 375 International Relations of East Asia (3)
REL 324 Buddhism in China, Korea, and Japan (3)

Linguistics:
ATH/ GER 309 or ENG/ SPN 303 Introduction to Linguistics (4)

* A student who majors in East Asian Languages and Cultures (China concentration) may
not minor in Chinese.
** The Japanese minor will also satisfy this requirement

Program Requirements: Japan/China Combination*
(27 semester hours plus 12 related hours)

Required courses in Japanese and Chinese (15 semester hours)

CHI 201, 202 Second Year Chinese (3,3)
JPN 201, 202 Second Year Japanese (3, 3)
JPN 301 Third Year Japanese (3) or
       CHI Third Year Chinese (3)

Selected courses (12 semester hours) from:

a. Two of these:
JPN 231 Japanese Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3)
JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
JPN 260 Topics in Japanese Literature in English Translation (3)
JPN 266 Survey of Japanese Cinema: Japanese Film and Culture (3)
JPN 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (3)
JPN 302 Third Year Japanese (3)
JPN 381 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (3)
JPN 401 Japanese Culture and Society in Contemporary Texts I (3)
JPN 402 Japanese Culture and Society in Contemporary Texts II (3)

b. Two of these:
CHI 251 Traditional Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
CHI 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture in English Translation (3)
CHI 277W Chinese Culture Live (1-3)
CHI 302 Third Year Chinese (3)
CHI 401 Fourth Year Chinese (3)
CHI 402 Fourth Year Chinese (3)
Note: These Selected courses may be used in Related hours if not used as Selected courses.

Related hours

12 semester hours from the following including at least one course each
from the China and Japan groups:

Japan:
ARC 428 Japanese Architecture (3)
ART 479 Japanese Painting and Prints (3)
HST 356 Modern Japanese History (3)
SOC 408 Contemporary Japanese Society (3)

China:
ART 311 Chinese Painting History (3)
HST 353 History of Chinese Civilization (3)
HST 354 Modern Chinese History (3)
HST 383 Women in Chinese History (3)
HST 400.6 Senior Capstone: Asian History (3)
HST 434 China and the Silk Road:
       Patterns of China's Interactions with Other Peoples before 1600 (3)
GEO 410D Regional Analysis of China (3)

East Asia:
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)
POL 335 Politics of China and Japan (4)
POL 375 International Relations of East Asia (3)
REL 324 Buddhism in China, Korea, and Japan (3)

Linguistics:
ATH/ GER 309 or ENG/ SPN 303 Introduction to Linguistics (4)

* A student who majors in East Asian Languages and Cultures (Japan/China combination) may
not minor in Japanese, Chinese, or East Asian Studies only, but may double minor in Japanese and Chinese,
Japanese and East Asian Studies, or Chinese and East Asian Studies.

Economics: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Economics 208 Laws Hall (513-529-2836).

This is one of three programs Miami offers in economics. Another is business-economics in the School of Business Administration. The same core of economics courses is required for both majors; the difference is the divisional requirements. You should choose this program if you are interested in a liberal arts background in addition to your major. The third major is the Bachelor of Science in Quantitative Economics described below.

Honors in Economics

To receive departmental honors, you must meet all of these requirements:

  • Completion of ECO 315 and 317 during your junior year with at least a 3.50 g.p.a. If you have not completed this by the end of your junior year, you are not permitted to enroll in ECO 480, 482 except as approved by the honors coordinator.
  • Completion of ECO 480, 482 with at least a 3.50 g.p.a.
  • Attainment of a minimum 3.50 g.p.a. for all economics courses.
  • Completion of a minimum of 30 hours of economics including ECO 311 and two additional courses other than ECO 480, 482 that requires ECO 315 and/or 317 as prerequisite. It is highly recommended that ECO 311 be completed by the end of the junior year.

Program Requirements (30 semester hours)

All of these:
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
ECO 311 Examining Economic Data and Models (3)
ECO 315 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3)
ECO 317 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3)

Fifteen additional hours in economics, including at least six hours in courses that require
ECO 315 and/or 317 as prerequisite.

At least nine hours of advanced economics (numbered above 300) must be taken at Miami, including ECO 315 and 317. Any exception to this must be approved by the directorof undergraduate studies.

Related Hours (16 required)

Calculus. One of these:
MTH 151 Calculus I (5)
MTH 153 Calculus I (4)
MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)

Statistics. One of these:
DSC 205 Statistics (4)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)

Choose your remaining hours from accountancy, decision sciences, finance, geography, history, management information systems, mathematics, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, statistics, or systems analysis.

Mathematics and statistics beyond the minimum requirement is recommended if you areconsidering graduate school in economics. See your adviser.

Economics: Bachelor of Science in Quantitative Economics

For information contact the Department of Economics 208 Laws Hall (513-529-2836).

This program enables students to undertake a more rigorous and quantitative course of study, while still completing their degree work in four years. Additional required courses (including more quantitative courses), combined with more advanced mathematics and statistics requirements are an ideal preparation for graduate training in economics, as well as jobs in business, industry and government that require the more technical tools of economic theory and econometrics.

Program Requirements (36 semester hours)

All of these:
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
ECO 311 Examining Economic Data and Models (3)
ECO 315 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3)
ECO 317 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3)

Twenty-one (21) additional hours of economics (six of which must include ECO 315 and/or ECO 317), including:
ECO 414 Mathematical Microeconomics (3) or
ECO 465 Game Theory with Economic Applications (3) or
an acceptable alternative economics, mathematics, or statistics course (alternatives must be approved by the departmental chief adviser, ideally before the student enrolls in the course)

Related Hours (20 required)

Mathematics - All of these:
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 249 Calculus II (5) or
        MTH 251 Calculus I (4) or
        MTH 257H Honors Calculus (4)
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)

One of these:
DSC 444 Business Forecasting (3)
DSC 447 Analysis of Multivariate Business Data (3)
MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)
MTH 422 Matrices and Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 432 Optimization (3)
MTH 441 Real Analysis (3)
STA 463 Regression Analysis (3)
STA 467 Multivariate Analysis (3)
STA 483 Analysis of Forecasting Systems (3)

Statistics - Both of these:
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)

Engineering Physics: Bachelor of Science

For information contact the Department of Physics, 133 Culler Hall (513-529-5625).

This major prepares students for employment in technical fields or entry into professional engineering programs at the undergraduate or graduate level. Students wishing to participate in the 3-2 combined plan in engineering should choose this major.

Program Requirements: Bachelor of Science
(55-61 semester hours)

All of these (40-44 semester hours):
MTH 151, 251 Calculus I, II (5, 4) or
        MTH 153, 251 Calculus I, II (4, 4) or
        MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World I, II (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
PHY 286 Introduction to Computational Physics (3)
PHY 291 Contemporary Physics (4)
PHY 292 Electronic Instrumentation (3)
PHY 293 Contemporary Physics Laboratory (2)
PHY 294 Laboratory in Electronic Instrumentation (2)
PHY 341 Mathematical Methods in Physics (4)

Plus one of the following paths:

Path 1:
Complete the 3-2 Binary Engineeering Program (see additional notes below)

Path 2:
Complete one of the following minors in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at Miami:

  • electrical engineering (22 semester hours)
  • manufacturing engineering (25 semester hours)
  • mechanical engineering (18 semester hours)
  • computer science (18 semester hours)
  • computer engineering (15 semester hours)

Path 3:
Complete one of the following applied physics tracks:

Electro-Optics Track (16 semester hours):
PHY 441 Optics and Laser Physics (4)
PHY 442 Spectroscopy of Atoms and Molecules (4)
PHY 461 Electricity and Magnetism (4)
PHY 491 Quantum Mechanics (4)

Electrical/Instrumentation Track (22-24 semester hours):
ECE/ MME 303 Computer-Aided Experimentation (3)
PHY 423 Materials Physics (4)
PHY 451 Classical Mechanics (4) or
        MME 143 Engineering Design and Computer Graphics (3) and
        MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
PHY 461 Electricity and Magnetism (4)
PHY 471 Advanced Electronics (3)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
Recommended additional elective: PHY 491 Quantum Mechanics (4)

Materials Track (17-18 semester hours)
CHM 137 College Chemistry (4) or
        CHM 141 College Chemistry (3)
MME 223 Engineering Materials (3)
MME/ PCE 313 Fluid Mechanics (3)
PHY 423 Materials Physics (4)
PHY 437 Intermediate Thermodynamics and Introduction to Statistical Physics (4)
Recommended additional elective: PHY 491 Quantum Mechanics (4)

Biomedical Track (22-29 semester hours)
CHM 137 College Chemistry (4) or CHM 141 College Chemistry (3) and
CHM 144 College Chemistry Lab (2)
CHM 142,145 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (5)
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry with Lab (for non-premeds) (4) or
CHM 241, 242, 244, 245 Organic Chemistry with Lab (for premeds) (10)
PHY 421 Biophysics (4)
ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology (4)
Recommended additional elective: ZOO 305 Animal Physiology (4)

Program Requirements: 3-2 Program

Students planning an engineering degree may arrange a B.S. 3-2 plan with any engineering school. However, Miami has special cooperative arrangements with Case Western Reserve University, Columbia University, and Washington University (St. Louis), whereby, upon completing all requirements, admission to the engineering program is assured. Students must earn a minimum of 96 hours at Miami (with 32 hours at the 200 level or above) with a g.p.a. of at least 3.00. All Miami Plan and College of Arts and Science requirements must be satisfied. Completion of the 3-2 Program will satisfy the Miami Plan Capstone requirement. Students must file a petition with the College of Arts and Science to participate in the 3-2 Program. For more information see the "Combined Programs" and "Arts-Professional Arrangement" sections that appear elsewhere in the General Bulletin.

Note: It is best to begin academic planning in your first year at Miami for later participation in the 3-2 Program. Contact the 3-2 Engineering Liaison Adviser, Chief Departmental Adviser, or your academic adviser in the Department of Physics for more information. All students planning on participating in the 3-2 Program must take at least one year of chemistry ( CHM 141 or 137, 144, 142, and 145) and differential equations ( MTH 245 or 347) before transferring to the engineering school. Students wishing to specialize in chemical engineering should take CHM 153 and 161 in place of CHM 144 and 145. Organic chemistry should also be taken by students wishing to specialize in chemical or biomedical engineering. If you plan to apply to Case Western Reserve University, Columbia University, or Washington University, you also need to see an adviser in the Department of Physics for more specific information on the requirements of those schools.

English: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of English, 356 Bachelor Hall (513-529-5221).

Three concentrations are offered within the English major: literature, creative writing, and technical and scientific communication. These concentrations lead to an A.B. The department also offers a major in linguistics; see Linguistics later in this chapter.

Program Requirements: English/Literature (39 semester hours)

Prerequisite literature courses. Two of these:
Prerequisite literature courses. Two of these:
ENG 121 Introduction to Comedy or Tragedy (3)
ENG 122 Popular Literature (3)
ENG 123 Introduction to Poetry (3)
ENG 124 Introduction to Fiction (3)
ENG 125 Introduction to Drama (3)
ENG 131 Life and Thought in English Literature, to 1660 (3)
ENG 132 Life and Thought in English Literature, 1660-1901 (3)
ENG 133 Life and Thought in English Literature, 1901-Present (3)
ENG 134 Introduction to Shakespeare (3)
ENG 141 Life and Thought in American Literature, to 1865 (3)
ENG 142 Life and Thought in American Literature, 1865-1945 (3)
ENG 143 Life and Thought in American Literature, 1945-Present (3)
ENG 144 Major American Writers (3)
ENG 161 Literature and Politics (3)
ENG 162 Literature and Identity (3)
ENG 163 Literature and Travel (3)
ENG 165 Literature and Sexuality (3)

Prerequisite introductory course. This one:*
ENG 298 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies (3)

* Completed first semester of sophomore year at Miami or first semester after declaring the literature major, whichever is later.

Eight literature courses, including:

No more than three of these:
ENG 220 Literature and Film (3)
ENG 221 Shakespeare and Film (3)
ENG 231 The Short Story (3)
ENG 232 American Women Writers (3)
ENG 233 British Women Writers (3)
ENG 237 Gay and Lesbian Literature (3)
ENG 246 Native American Literature (3)
ENG 248 Asian American Literature (3)
ENG 251 Life and Thought in European Literature, to 1800 (3)
ENG 252 Life and Thought in European Literature, 1800-Present (3)
ENG 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas (3)
ENG 259 The Modern Novel (3)
ENG 261 Modern Drama (3)
ENG 262 Children's Literature (3)
ENG 271 Cultures and Literature of the American South (3)
ENG 281 The English Novel (3)
ENG 282 American Fiction (3)
ENG 283 Modern Poetry (3)
ENG 284 English Drama, 1660-1800 (3)
ENG 293 Contemporary American Fiction (3)

And no more than six of these:
ENG 327 Medieval Literature (3)
ENG 328 The Renaissance: Non-Dramatic Literature (3)
ENG 331 17th Century Poetry and Prose (3)
ENG 334 English Literature of the Restoration (3)
ENG 335 English Literature of the 18th Century (3)
ENG 336 African American Writing, 1746-1877 (3)
ENG 337 African American Writing, 1878-1945 (3)
ENG 338 African American Writing, 1946-Present (3)
ENG 339 Writers of the Early Romantic Period (3)
ENG 342 Writers of the Later Romantic Period (3)
ENG 343 Literature of the Early Victorian Period (3)
ENG 344 Literature of the Later Victorian Period (3)
ENG 345 British Modernism (3)
ENG 346 Modern English and American Drama (3)
ENG 347 Postwar/Postcolonial British Literature (3)
ENG 348 Ethnic American Literatures (3)
ENG 349 Colonial and Early National American Literature, to 1810 (3)
ENG 352 American Literature, 1810-1865 (3)
ENG 353 American Literature, 1865-1914 (3)
ENG 354 American Literature, 1914-1945 (3)
ENG 355 American Literature, 1945- Present (3)
ENG 369 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature (3)
ENG 372 Shakespeare's Principal Plays: The Early Period (3)
ENG 373 Shakespeare's Principal Plays: The Later Period (3)
ENG 390 Studies in American Regionalism (3)

And at least two of these:
ENG 440 Major English and American Writers (3)
ENG 450 Studies in Genre (3)
ENG 468 Gender and Genre (3)
ENG 480 English Honors (3)
ENG 490 Special Topics in Literary Study (3)

Literary, cultural, or other theory. One of these:
ENG 368 Feminist Literary Theory (3)
ENG 370 Literary and Cultural Theory (3)
ENG 435 Queer Theory (3)
ENG 470 Topics in Literary Theory (3)

Senior Capstone. This one:
ENG 495 Capstone in Literature (3)

Distribution Requirements
Choose literature courses above to also meet the following group requirements. A course may count in more than one requirement (e.g., ENG 337 meets American, ethnic/minority/women's, and 1660-1900 requirements).

British literature. Five of these:
ENG 131, 132, 133, 134, 221, 233, 281, 284, 327, 328, 331, 334, 335, 339, 342, 343.

American literature. Three of these:
ENG 141, 142, 143, 144, 232, 248, 254, 271, 282, 293, 336, 337, 338, 349, 352, 353.

Ethnic, minority, or women's literature. One of these:
ENG 232, 233, 237, 246, 248, 254, 336, 337, 338, 348, 369, 468.

Literature before 1660. Two of these:
ENG 131, 327, 328, 331 or one may also be chosen from these: ENG 134, 221, 372, 373.

Literature between 1660 and 1900. Three of these:
ENG 132, 141, 284, 334, 335, 336, 337, 339, 342, 343, 344, 349, 352, 353.

Literature from 1900 to the present. One of these:
ENG 133, 143, 259, 261, 282, 284, 293, 338, 345, 346, 347, 354, 355, 369.

Program Requirements: English/Creative Writing
(42 semester hours)

Prerequisite Literature Courses

Both of these:
ENG 123 Introduction to Poetry (3)
ENG 124 Introduction to Fiction (3)

Note: These courses must be taken either before or coincident with 300 level writing courses in the same genre.

British Literature Courses

One course from each of the three groups below:
A. Courses before 1700:
ENG 327 Medieval Literature (3)
ENG 328 The Renaissance (3)
ENG 331 17th Century British Literature (3)
ENG 334 English Literature of the Restoration (3)
ENG 372 Shakespeare's Principal Plays: The Early Period (3)
ENG 373 Shakespeare's Principal Plays: The Later Period (3)

B. Courses between 1700 and 1880:
ENG 335 English Literature of the 18th Century (3)
ENG 339 Writers of the Early Romantic Period (3)
ENG 342 Writers of the Later Romantic Period (3)
ENG 343 Early Victorian Period (3)

C. Courses after 1880:
ENG 344 Later Victorian Period (3)
ENG 345 British Modernism (3)
ENG 346 Modern English and American Drama (3)
ENG 347 Postwar/Postcolonial British Literature (3)
Note: Major Writers courses ( ENG 440) and Special Topics courses ( ENG 490) may be used to fulfill a British literature requirement when the course meets the historical period requirements.

American Literature Courses

One course from each group below:
A. Courses before 1900:
ENG 336 African American Writing 1746-1877 (3)
ENG 349 Colonial and Early National American Literature (3)
ENG 352 American Lit 1810-1865 (3)
ENG 353 American Lit 1865-1914 (3)

B. Unrestricted Courses
Any 300-level American Literature course (3)
ENG 440 or ENG 490, when topic is American Literature (3)

Genre

One of these:
ENG 231 The Short Story (3)
ENG 259 Modern World Novel (3)
ENG 261 Modern Drama (3)
ENG 281 The English Novel (3)
ENG 282 American Fiction (3)
ENG 283 Modern Poetry (3)

Contemporary Writing

One of these:
ENG 311 Contemporary Fiction (3)
ENG 312 Contemporary Poetry (3)

Issues in Creative Writing

One of these:
ENG 460 Issues in Creative Writing (3)
ENG 495 Capstone in Literature (3)

Creative Writing

This one:
ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing (3)

Note: ENG 226 is the prerequisite for the 300 level courses

Nine additional hours of creative writing at 300- and 400 levels, from these courses:
ENG 320 Creative Writing: Short Story (3)
ENG 321 Creative Writing: Literary Marketplace (3)
ENG 323 Creative Non-Fiction (3)
ENG 330 Creative Writing: Poetry (3)
ENG 420 Advanced Undergraduate Fiction Workshop (3)
ENG 422 Creative Writing: Screenwriting (3)
ENG 430 Advanced Undergraduate Poetry Workshop (3)

Note: (1) ENG 320 is the prerequisite for ENG 420; ENG 330 is the prerequisite for ENG 430. Students must take an intermediate and advanced course in the same genre, poetry or fiction. (2) ENG 320, 330, 420, and 430 may be taken a second time with a different instructor. Repeat credits will not count toward the major requirement of nine (9) hours of creative writing courses, but will count toward the 128 hours required for a degree.

Program Requirements: Technical and Scientific Communication (52 semester hours)

Special Admission Requirements

Enrollment is limited to 20 new students each year. Students can apply for pre-major status in the English department, and then apply for formal acceptance to the major after they have completed (or when they are currently enrolled in) ENG 313 (on the Oxford and Middletown campuses) or ENG 215 (on the Hamilton campus). Students must apply to the major before enrolling in ENG 415. For more information contact the Department of English, 356 Bachelor Hall (513-529-5221).

Required English Courses (22 semester hours)

All of these:
ENG 302 Structure of Modern English (4)
ENG 313 Introduction to Technical Writing (3) or ENG 215 Technical Writing (H) (3)
ENG 411/511 Visual Rhetoric for Technical and Scientific Communicators (3)
ENG 412/512 Editing for Technical and Scientific Communicators (3)
ENG 413/513 Writing Reports and Proposals (3)
ENG 414/514 Designing and Testing User Documents for Technical and
       Scientific Communicators (3)
ENG 415 Practicum in Technical and Scientific Communication (open to majors only) (3)

Required Related Hours (12 semester hours)

COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
JRN 201 News Writing and Reporting (3)
JRN 318 Feature Writing for Newspapers (3)

Choose any three of these:
IMS 101F Web Animation (1)
IMS 101G Digital Image Creation and Manipulation (1)
IMS 101H Web Publishing and HTML (1)
IMS 101P Desktop Publishing (1)
IMS 101V Digital Video Editing (1)

Professional Area Courses (required)

Eighteen hours of approved courses (see the major handbook or visit www.muohio.edu/batsc) in one of these areas:

  • Computer science
  • Environmental science
  • Medical and health sciences

Environmental Principles and Practice Co-Major

This co-major emphasizes human-nature interaction in understanding environmental patterns and processes. Students are prepared to pursue a wide variety of career paths and post-graduate degrees in environmental science, especially those with management and policy specializations. The term "co-major" is unique and indicates that students must be concurrently enrolled in and must complete another major at Miami University. The co-major complements this primary major, which provides significant depth and breadth in an academic discipline. There is no specific degree designation for the co-major; students receive the degree designation of their primary major.

Program Requirements: (38-48 semester hours)

Complete a major in one of the divisions of the university.

Biological Science (3-4 semester hours)
one of these:
BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and Environment (3)
BOT 171 Ecology of North America (3)
ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (3)

Physical Science (3-4 semester hours)
GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environments (4)
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3)

Social Science (10 semester hours):
These two courses:
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
POL 241 American Political System (4)

One of these:
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3)
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3)
GEO 111 World Regional Geography: Patterns and Issues (3)

Statistics (4 semester hours)
One of these:
DSC 205 Business Statistics (4)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
Equivalent statistics course approved by Advisory Committee and adviser.

Environmental Science (15-21 semester hours):
This course:
ENV 274 Introduction to Environmental Principles (3), and


Four of these (maximum one from department of primary major):
AMS 397; ARC 312, 413, 414, 450; ATH 371, 426, 455, 471, 476, 497
BOT 351, 401, 431, 432, 467, 494, 496, 499A, 499N; BUS 494; BWS 495
CHM 491; ECO 434; GEO 333, 421, 424, 425, 426, 428, 431, 432, 436, 437, 494, 496
GLG 335, 401, 402, 408, 412, 413, 414, 415, 454, 491, 494, 496; GTY 476; HST 397, 495
IES 414, 431, 450, 499B; LAS 414; MBI 475; PHL 376; POL 363; WCP 401; WMS 436
ZOO 333, 351, 462, 463, 467, 494, 497

Synthesis and Integration (3 semester hours)
This one:
ENV 474 Environmental Practice (3)

This requirement:
Extramural environmental experience during summer of sophomore or junior year, such as workshop, internship, co-op, employment, or other experience. This experience must be approved in advance by the Advisory Committee and your adviser.

Environmental Science Co-Major

This co-major emphasizes earth science and life science approaches to understanding environmental patterns and processes. Students are prepared to pursue a wide variety of career paths and post-graduate degrees in environmental science, especially those with biological and physical science specializations. The term "co-major" is unique and indicates that students must be concurrently enrolled in and must complete another major at Miami University. The co-major complements this primary major, which provides significant depth and breadth in an academic discipline. There is no specific degree designation for the co-major; students receive the degree designation of their primary major.

Program Requirements: (33-39 semester hours)

Complete a major in one of the divisions of the university.

Biological Science - one of these:
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (4)
BOT 191 General Botany (4)
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (offered at Hamilton/Middletown only) (4)

Physical Science (8 semester hours; one course from group a. and one from b.)

  1. CHM 111 Chemistry in Modern Society (4)
    CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (3,2)
    GLG 211 Chemistry of Earth Systems (GLG majors only) (4)
  2. GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (3)
    GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3)
    GLG 131 Geology and Gemstones (3)
    GLG 141 Geology of U.S. National Parks (3)
    GLG 115L Geology Lab (required with any GLG enrollment) (1)
    GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environments (4)

    Note: PHY 171/172 or 181/182 strongly recommended.

Statistics (3-4 semester hours)
One of these:
STA 261 Statistics (4)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
STA 462 Inferential Statistics (3)

Social Science (6-7 semester hours):
This course:
ECO 201 Microeconomics (3), and

One of these:
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3)
GEO 101 Global Forces and Local Diversity (3)
POL 241 American Political System (4)
POL 261 Public Administration (4)

Environmental Science (9-11 semester hours):
This course:
BOT/CHM/ENV/GEO/GLG/MBI/STA/ ZOO 275 Principles of Environmental Science (3), and
Two of these (at least one outside department of primary major):
BOT 401, 431, 432, 467
CHM 363/364, 454, 463
GEO 421, 425, 428, 431, 432, 437, 441
GLG 335, 401, 402, 408, 432, 454, 482, 491, 496
MBI 402, 475
PHY 421, 437, 441
STA 475
ZOO 333, 453, 462, 463, 467

Practicum and Synthesis (3-5 semester hours)
One of these:
BOT/ ZOO 351 Environmental Education (4)
BOT/GEO/GLG/ ZOO 494 Sustainability Perspectives in Resources and Business (3)
GEO 436 Women, Gender and the Environment (3)
Field-Based Workshops (See department for available workshops)
Honors Thesis (3)
IES 431 Principles and Applications of Environmental Science (3)*
Independent Study 377 (3) or Internship 340 (3)*

* must be approved by Advisory Committee and Departmental Adviser

French: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of French and Italian, 207 Irvin Hall (513-529-7508). Students are encouraged to participate in the Department's summer programs abroad.

Teacher Licensure

Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter. For information, contact the Office of Student Services in the School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6418).

Program Requirements (30 semester hours)

After taking FRE 301 (3), take six hours of FRE 302, 303, or 310, in no particular sequence. Of the remaining 21 hours, take 18 hours at 400 level, including the required three-hour senior seminar ( FRE 410) and the required three-hour writing workshop ( FRE 415). No more than three hours in translation count toward this major. FRE 361 Pronunciation does not count toward this major.

Geography: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Geography, 216 Shideler Hall (513-529-5010).

Geographers study human (social, economic, political) and environmental (atmospheric, biologic, geologic) processes that create diverse global patterns in physical and cultural landscapes. Geography especially focuses on understanding how people and societies relate with each other and their environment. Geographers are positioned to work for positive development initiatives in local communities and around the world.

Program Requirements (36 semester hours)

Foundation Courses. Both of these:
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3) or
        GEO 111 World Regional Geography (3)
GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environments (4)

Core Courses. Both of these:
GEO 211 Global Change (3)
GEO 241 Map Interpretation (3)

Recommended elective:
GEO 395 Scholarship and Practice in Geography (1)

Specialization Paths. At least 12 hours in one of these four paths:

Environmental Change Path
This one:
GEO 221 Regional Physical Environments (3) and
At least two of these:
GEO 271 Humans and Natural Resources (3)
GEO 333 Geography of Natural Hazards (3)
GEO 401 Sustainable Regions (3)
GEO 421 Climatology (3)
GEO 424 Geomorphology (4)
GEO 425 Hydrogeography (3)
GEO 426 Watershed Management (3)
GEO 428 Soil Geography (4)
GEO 431 Global Plant Diversity (3)
GEO 432 Ecoregions of North America (3)
GEO 436 Women, Gender, and the Environment (3)
GEO 437 Regional Land Use Capability Analysis (3)
GEO 441 Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 442 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 444 GI Science in Landscape Ecology (3)
GEO 447 Aerial Photo Interpretation (4)
GEO 448 Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing (3)
GEO 494 Sustainability Perspectives in Resources and Business (3)
GEO 496 Biodiversity in Kenya (5)
Selected GEO 460 courses with permission of adviser.

Global Development Path
At least one of these:
GEO 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3)
GEO 301 Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (4)
GEO 304 Latin American Development (3)
GEO 307 Geography of Russia (3)
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)
GEO 311 Geography of Western Europe (4)
GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3)
Selected GEO 410 courses with permission of adviser;
and
At least two of these:
GEO 378 Political Geography (3)
GEO 401 Sustainable Regions (3)
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (3)
GEO 436 Women, Gender, and the Environment (3)
GEO 437 Regional Land Use Capability Analysis (3)
GEO 441 Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 442 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 447 Aerial Photo Interpretation (4)
GEO 448 Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing (3)
GEO 455 Race, Urban Change, and Conflict in America (3)
GEO 457 Global Cities (3)
GEO 461 Migrants and Diasporas (3)
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment (3)
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization (3)
GEO 476 Global Poverty (3)
GEO 496 Biodiversity of Kenya (5)
Selected GEO 460 courses with the permission of adviser.

Comparative Urban Economic Path
This one:
GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3) and
At least two of these:
GEO 437 Regional Land Use Capability Analysis (3)
GEO 441 Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 442 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 447 Aerial Photo Interpretation (4)
GEO 448 Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing (3)
GEO 451 Urban and Regional Planning (3)
GEO 454 Urban Geography (3)
GEO 455 Race, Urban Change, and Conflict in America (3)
GEO 457 Global Cities (3)
GEO 458 Cities of Difference (3)
GEO 459 Advanced Urban and Regional Planning (3)
GEO 462 Public Space (3)
GEO 467 Land Use, Law, and the State (3)
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment (3)
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization (3)
GEO 492 Geography of the Auto Industry (3)
Selected GEO 460 courses with the permission of adviser.

Environmental and Society Path
Select courses based on a study plan created in consultation with an adviser.

Required Capstone Course
GEO 491 Senior Seminar (4)

Workshop, internship, or other fieldwork in geography is strongly encouraged and will count towards required hours (with permission of adviser).

• Additional geography courses to total 36 hours in the major, chosen in consultation with your adviser.

Geology: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science

For information contact the Department of Geology, 114 Shideler Hall (513-529-3216).

Geology is the study of the history of the Earth and processes that continue to shape the planet today. Geoscientists view the Earth as a set of intimately connected atmospheric, hydrologic, and rock systems.

The department offers several majors: Bachelor of Arts (areas of emphasis in environmental geology and the solid earth), Bachelor of Arts with teacher licensure in earth science, Bachelor of Science (areas of emphasis in environmental geology and the solid earth), and Bachelor of Science in Education in earth science education.

The Bachelor of Science degree is designed to provide more in-depth study, particularly in preparation for pursuit of a graduate degree in the geological sciences. As part of this preparation, students are required to conduct independent research leading to public presentation of their results.

Teacher Licensure

Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter. For information, contact the Office of Student Services in the School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6418).

Program Requirements: Bachelor of Arts
(39 semester hours minimum)

Core requirements. All of these (29 semester hours):
GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (3) or
        GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3) or
        GLG 131 Geology and Gemstones (3) or
        GLG 141 Geology of U.S. National Parks (3)
GLG 115.L Laboratory (1)
GLG 201 Mineralogy (4)
GLG 211 Chemistry of Earth Systems (3)
GLG 301 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (4)
GLG 322 Structural Geology (4)
GLG 357 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (4)
GLG 411 Field Geology (6)

Environmental emphasis (minimum 10 semester hours):
GLG 335 Ice Age Earth (3)
GLG 401 Global Climate Change (4)
GLG 402 Geomicrobiology (3)
GLG 408 Introduction to Hydrogeology (4)
GLG 415 Coastal Reef Ecology (5)
GLG 428 Groundwater Flow Modeling (4)
GLG 432 Powder X-Ray Diffraction and Clay Analysis (3)
GLG 435 Soils and Paleosis (3)
GLG 436 Paleoclimatology (3)
GLG 454 Geomorphology (4)
GLG 482 Contaminant Hydrogeology (4)
GLG 484 X-Ray Diffractometry (2)
GLG 491 Geochemistry of Natural Waters (3)
GLG 496 Isotopes in Environmental Processes (3)

Solid earth emphasis (minimum 10 semester hours):
GLG 416 Carbonate Depositional Systems (5)
GLG 427 Isotope Geochemistry (3)
GLG 432 Powder X-Ray Diffraction and Clay Analysis (3)
GLG 450 Sedimentary Basin Analysis (3)
GLG 454 Geomorphology (4)
GLG 461 Geophysics (3)
GEO 467 Seismology (3)
GLG 492 Global Tectonics (4)
GLG 484 X-Ray Diffractometry (2)

Related Hours (13-16 required)

CHM 137 or 141, 144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Laboratory (4 or 3, 2)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5) or
        MTH 153 Calculus I (4)
PHY 171 College Physics (3) or
        PHY 181 The Physical World (4) and
        PHY 183 Physics Laboratory (1)

Program Requirements: Bachelor of Science
(46 semester hours minimum)

Core requirements
All courses required for the Bachelor of Arts degree in geology
One additional 400 level course
GLG 477 or 480 or equivalent research project (3)
       Public presentation of research project
CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (3,2)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4) or
        STA 261 Statistics (4)
PHY 182, 184 The Physical World/Physics Lab (4, 1)

German: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of German, Russian, and East Asian Languages, 172 Irvin Hall (513-529-2526).

This program provides students with a solid foundation in language, literature, and culture. The department offers an intensive summer program in Europe for students at intermediate and advanced levels. Students are encouraged to take the internationally recognized examinations in German/business German given annually.

Only three semester hours in English translation can be applied toward the required 27 semester hours. All courses for the German major must be taken for a grade except courses only offered as credit/no-credit.

Teacher Licensure

Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter. For information, contact the Office of Student Services in the School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6418).

Program Requirements (27 semester hours above GER 206)

Select courses from these areas:

Language skills. At least three semester hours from these:
GER 301 Advanced German Composition and Conversation (3)
GER 303 German for Business (3)

Literature. Take both of these:
GER 311 Passionate Friendships in German Literature (3)
GER 312 Coming of Age in German Life and Thought (3)

Culture. At least three semester hours from these:
GER 321 Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe (3)
GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture: German-Speaking Europe and the USA (3)

Advanced study:
GER 471 Linguistic Perspectives in Contemporary German (3)
Three additional courses, two must be at the 400 level, at least one must be a literature course. The remaining course, if below 400, must be from GER 251, 260, 261, 321, or 322.

Related Hours (16 required)

These may include study of other national literatures, literary theory, comparative literature, linguistics, or another language. Depending on the subject, another major or minor may satisfy this requirement. Courses in music, art, history, political science, and other disciplines qualify on the basis of their content. Related hours must be approved by your adviser.

Gerontology: Bachelor of Arts

This major provides students with a multidisciplinary approach to the study of aging in a social context. Students examine the varied experiences of physical, psychological and social aging in an aging society and world. The major draws from theoretical work in anthropology, psychology, social work/welfare, and sociology. This major prepares students for careers and further study in a broad range of fields and disciplines related to individual and societal aging.

Program Requirements (38 semester hours)

Multidisciplinary Core. All of these:
GTY 154 Aging in American Society (3)
GTY/ SOC 318 Sociology of Aging and the Life Course (3)
GTY 365 Social Policy and Programs in Gerontology (3)
GTY 375 Aging, Self, and Society (3)
GTY 440G Capstone Field Experience in Gerontology (MPC) (1-16, maximum 16)
SOC 262 Research Methods (4)
STA 261 Statistics (4)

Diversity. One of these:
GTY 260 Global Aging (3)
GTY/SOC/WMS 463 Gender and Aging (3)
GTY/ BWS 472 Race, Ethnicity, and Aging (3)

Health. One of these:
GTY 335 Disability and Aging (3)
GTY 356 Biopsychosocial Aspects of Health and Aging (3)
GTY/ SOC 357 Medical Sociology (3)
GTY 478 Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Chronic Illness (4)

Socio-cultural Contexts. One of these:
GTY 435 Sociology of Death (3)
GTY/ FSW 466 The Family in Later Life (3)
GTY/ ATH 476 Environment and Aging (3)
GTY 485 Long-Term Care in an Aging Society (3)
SOC 257 Population (3)

Note: Students can count a course from a second major or other area of interest as an elective for the gerontology major. Some examples are:
KNH 471 Sport, Leisure, and Aging (3)
PHL 375 Moral Issues in Health Care (4)
PHL 475 Justice in Health Care (3)

Note: Gerontology majors are required to take at least one 400 level gerontology course in addition to GTY 440G. The department occasionally offers GTY 460 (Selected Topics in Gerontology) which can be included in one of the thematic clusters based on the specific topic.

History: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of History, 254 Upham Hall (513-529-5121).
The history major provides a specialized undergraduate program that strengthens a student's ability to read critically; analyze physical and written evidence; and develop clear, coherent arguments. These skills allow the student to engage the past with careful and imaginative questions. As students engage in the discipline of historical inquiry, they will become adept at developing written conclusions and oral presentations based on the systematic evaluation of historical evidence. Students will grow used to considering an array of cultures, familiar and unfamiliar, in diverse historical contexts.

Teacher Licensure

Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter. For information, contact the Office of Student Services in the School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6418).

Program Requirements (36 semester hours)

Introduction to History
At least three of these (one must be HST 121 or HST 197). You are not required to take these in sequence:
HST 111, 112 Survey of American History (3,3)
HST 121, 122 Western Civilization (3,3)
HST 197, 198 World History (3,3)

If you scored 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement examination in U.S. History ( HST 111 and 112, 6 credits), European History ( HST 122, 3 credits), and/or World History ( HST 198, 3 credits), you may apply up to six hours of these to the major. You must take either HST 121 or HST 197 for which there is no AP equivalent.

Introduction to Historical Inquiry
This one:
HST 206 Introduction to Historical Inquiry (3)

Historical Eras and Topics (at least 18 semester hours)
You must take 18 hours of history courses at the 200- and/or 300 level. One course (3 semester hours) must be on the history of Africa, the Middle East, Asia, or Latin America. One course (3 semester hours) must be on the pre-modern period.
It is recommended that you take HST 206 Introduction to Historical Inquiry prior to taking classes at this level.

Applying Historical Skills (at least 6 semester hours)
You must take six hours of history courses at the 400 level. One course must be HST 400 Senior Capstone (3), which also fulfills the Capstone Experience requirement in the Miami Plan. It is recommended that you complete at least two 200/300 level courses in the major before taking a class at the 400 level. It is also recommended that you take at least one 200/300 level course in a subject that prepares you for the area content of the 400 level class.

Department Honors Option

History majors with a record of high achievement have the opportunity to participate in the Honors Program in History. Eligible students will receive invitations to the program no later than the first semester of their junior year. Participation in the program is by invitation only and is based in part on the number of history courses taken to that point and the grade point average in those courses.

Students accepted into the Honors Program in History must complete the following, unless arrangements are made in advance with the department honors director who can approve alternate ways of meeting these requirements.

HST 359 Junior Honors Colloquium (3)
Ordinarily taken in the second semester of the junior year.

HST 400 Honors Senior Capstone (3)
Ordinarily taken in the first semester of the senior year. Fulfills the departmental and Miami Plan capstone requirement.

HST 480 Departmental Honors (1-3)
An independent study course ordinarily taken in the second semester of the senior year with the senior thesis adviser.

Interactive Media Studies Co-Major

This co-major in Interactive Media Studies is an interdisciplinary major that is designed to complement the traditional disciplinary-focused major. It cannot be take independently of a disciplinary focus. The co-major includes courses that span across the breadth of Miami University's offerings. From art to the humanities to computer science, the IMS co-major brings the inherently interdisciplinary world of technology to the traditionally disciplinary student.

There are four concentrations within the co-major that allow students to focus their experience on a particular area of interactive media and to better complement their disciplinary area of focus. These concentrations include: 1) Digital Art and Design; 2) Digital Game Studies; 3) Digital Humanities and Social Science; and 4) Self-Designed (adviser approval required).

An application and "portfolio" are required for admittance. There is a minimum 2.50 g.p.a. requirement. A limited number of students are admitted each year.

Admission Guidelines

Students will be admitted to the co-major upon successful completion of all admission requirements:

  • Application made in March of the first-year or October of the second year.
  • a 2.50 Miami g.p.a.
  • Application with portfolio of related work (art, writing, code, etc.)
  • Interview of selected students

Program Requirements (36 semester hours)

Take all of the following:
IMS 101 Interactive Development Skills (1)
IMS101F Web Animation (1)
IMS 101G Presentation Graphics and Multimedia (1)
IMS 101H Web Design and HTML (1)
IMS 101P Desktop Publishing (1)
IMS 101V Video (1)

Take one of the following:
ENG 171 Humanities and Technology (MPF) (3)
ENG 313 Introduction to Technical Writing (3)
IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (MPT) (3)
IMS 333 New Economy: eBusiness, Entrepreneurship, and Venture Capital (MPT) (3)

Select a concentration (18 hours total):

Digital Art and Design
ART 256 Design, Perception, and Audience (MPF) (3)
IMS/ ART 259 Aesthethics and Computation (3)
IMS 310 Usability and Digital Media Design (4)
IMS 319 Foundations in 3-D Design (3)
IMS 333 New Economy: eBusiness, Entrepreneurship, and Venture Capital (MPT) (3)
IMS 356 Flash Animation (3)
IMS/ ART 359 Interactive Programming with ActionScript (3)
IMS 390 Special Topics (3)*
IMS/ARC 404Y Mind and Medium (3)
MUS 303 Electronic Music (MPT) (3)
PSY 462 Work Space and Work Organization (MPT) (3)

Digital Game Studies
ART/ IMS 259 Aesthethics and Computation (3)
ART/ IMS 359 ActionScripting for Artists (3)
CSA 251 Introduction to Game Programming (3)**
CSA 386 Introduction to Computer Graphics (3)
ENG/ IMS 238 Narrative and Digital Technology (3)
IMS 319 Foundations in 3-D and Animation (3)
IMS 390 Special Topics (3)*
IMS 445 Game Design (3)

Digital Humanities and Social Science
COM 211 Introduction to Electronic Media (4)
ENG 411/511 Visual Rhetoric (3)
ENG 414/514 Designing and Testing User Documents (3)
IMS/ ENG 238 Narrative and Digital Technology (3)
IMS/ JRN 303 Online Journalism (3)
IMS 356 Flash Animation (3)
IMS 390 Special Topics (3)*
MUS 303 Electronic Music (MPT) (3)
PSY 462 Work Space and Work Organization (MPT) (3)

Self-Designed Concentration
Pick 18 hours from any of the above concentrations. Adviser approval required prior to beginning concentration.

* Topic appropriate for focus, adviser approval required
** Not open to CSA majors

Internship
IMS/ ART 340 Internship (1-3 hours, maximum 6)

Practicum
IMS 440/410 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (MPC) (4)

Independent Study
IMS 477 Interactive Media Studies Independent Study/Independent Project (3)

International Studies: Bachelor of Arts in International Studies

For information contact the director of the International Studies Program, 120 MacMillan Hall (513-529-5333).

This multidisciplinary program is for students desiring a broad foundation for understanding and analyzing important issues within an international and multicultural context. Its flexible curriculum provides a basis for graduate work or careers in government service, international business, academia, tourism, public service, cultural relations, and law. Overseas study is required as a part of this major.

Program Requirements

Interdisciplinary Core Courses (22-23 semester hours)

All of these:
ECO 344 International Economics (3)*
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3)
ITS 402 Policy Taskforce Capstone in International Studies (3)**
* ECO 201 and 202 are prerequisites
** Senior year only

One of these:
ITS 302 Problems of Non-Western Societies (3)
ITS 365 Topics in International Studies (3)

Three of these:
GEO 378 World Political Geography (4)
HST 198 World History 1500 to present (3)
ITS/ ATH 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
POL 271 World Politics (4)

Language Requirement (6-12 semester hours)
For French, German, or Spanish: 12 hours above 200 level, or a minor (other languages must complete only 6 hours above 200 level).

Concentration Requirement (12 semester hours)
Choose between the functional concentration and the regional concentration. You must take at least 12 credit hours from at least three different disciplines in your chosen concentration.

Functional Concentrations: Regional Concentrations:
  • Conflict, Peace and Diplomacy*
  • International Development
  • Global Cultural Relations
  • The Global Environment
  • Women in the World

* Take 12 hours from at least two different disciplines

  • Africa
  • Asia
  • Latin America
  • Middle East
  • Russia and Eastern Europe
  • Western Europe

Italian Studies: Bachelor of Arts

For more information contact the Department of French and Italian, 207 Irvin (513-529-7508).

Prerequisite Preparatory Course (8 semester hours)

ITL 101,102 Beginners Italian (4, 4)* or
        ITL 105W Intensive Elementary Italian (eight weeks) (8)**

Generally two years of language study in high school are the equivalent of one year in college. It is not necessary to complete the first-year courses before embarking on the major. They may be take concurrently with major courses, but ideally should be completed during the student's first two years

* must be taken at Miami University
** offered at the Miami University Summer Language Institute in Italy

Required Course (3 semester hours)

ITL 221 Italy, Matrix of Civilization (3)

Core Courses (18-27 semester hours)

Choose at least six courses from the following (fewer if choosing ITL 205W or 305W, which are 8 hours each), for a minimum of 18 hours, up to as many as nine three credit courses, for a maximum of 27 semester hours.
ART 481 Italian Renaissance (3)
ART 484 High Renaisssance and Mannerist Art (3)
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3)
CLS 402 The Age of Augustus (3)
HST 315 The Renaissance (3)
HST 328 Italy: Machiavelli to Mussolini
HST 452 Florence in the Time of the Republic 1250-1550 (3)
ITL 201,202 Second-year Italian (3, 3) or
        ITL 205W Intensive Intermediate Italian (8)**
ITL/AMS/ FST 222 Italian American Culture (3)
ITL/ FST 262 Italian Cinema (in English) (3)
        ITL 301 Introduction to Italian Literature 13th-19th Centuries (in Italian) (3)
        ITL 302 Introduction to Italian Literature 20th-21st Centuries (in Italian) (3)
        ITL 305W Intensive Advanced Italian (8)**
ITL/ ENG 364 From Marco Polo to Machiavelli (3)
ITL/ ENG 401 Dante's Divine Comedy (in English)
MUS 462 Opera and Drama (3)
** offered at the Miami University Summer Language Institute in Italy

Supplementary Courses (up to 9 semester hours)

Choose remaining hours, if any, from the following:
ARC 405E Renaissance Architecture (3)
ART 315 Baroque Art (3)
ART 381 Greek and Roman Architecture (3)
ART 382 Greek and Roman Sculpture (3)
ART 383 Greek and Roman Painting (3)
CLS 210 Topics in Classics (when related to Roman culture) (1-3)
CLS 215 Roman Historians (3)
CLS 310 Advanced Topics in Classics (when related to Roman culture) (1-3)
HST 448 The Roman Republic (3)
HST 449 The Roman Empire (3)

Concentration in Italian Language and Literature

A notation will be added to the transcripts of students completing at least 18 credits in courses with an ITL designation, indicating that they have fulfilled the requirements for the Italian Studies Major with a Concentration in Italian Language and Literature. This concentration requires at least two years of Italian at the university level. ITL 301 and 302 are strongly recommended, as is participation in the Miami University Summer Language Institute in Urbino, Italy.

Required Courses (6 semester hours)*

ITL 201,202 Second-year Italian (3, 3) or
        ITL 205W Intensive Intermediate Italian (8)**

Strongly Recommended (3-14 semester hours)

ITL 301 Introduction to Italian Literature 13th-19th Centuries (in Italian) (3)
ITL 302 Introduction to Italian Literature 20th-21st Centuries (in Italian) (3)
ITL 305W Intensive Advanced Italian (8)**

Choose remaining hours, if any, from the following:
ITL/AMS/ FST 222 Italian American Culture (3)
ITL/ FST 262 Italian Cinema (in English) (3)
ITL/ ENG 364 From Marco Polo to Machiavelli (3)
ITL/ ENG 401 Dante's Divine Comedy (in English)

* eight semester hours if ITL 205W is chosen
** offered at the Miami University Summer Language Institute in Italy

Journalism: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the director of the Journalism Program, 260 Bachelor Hall (513-529-7525).

This program provides students with a liberal arts approach to integrated journalism (print, broadcast, and web) focusing on proficiency in critical thinking, writing, reporting, and editing. These skills prepare students for careers in print and broadcast journalism, new media, related professions, and graduate studies. The program further emphasizes the importance of acting as ethical and productive members of the media and the community at large.

Program Requirements (38 semester hours)

Admission to the journalism major is selective and students must eventually choose and complete a second major. Students enter the program as pre-journalism majors and may apply for admission to the major after completing the following:

Pre-Major Courses
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)
JRN 101 Introduction to Journalism (3)

In addition, students must:

  • Complete at least 18 hours in Miami Plan Foundation courses.
  • Pass a grammar and punctuation proficiency test.

After completing COM 143, JRN 101, the 18 MPF hours and passing the proficiency test, students are eligible to apply for admission to the major. The student's g.p.a. and performance in the pre-major and Miami Plan courses will be considered part of the admission criteria. See the journalism program director for details on applying for admission.

Major Degree Requirements
These two:
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)
JRN 101 Introduction to Journalism (3)

Core Requirements
All of these:
IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (3)
JRN 201 News Reporting and Writing (3)*
       (*Prerequisite for all JRN writing/editing courses)
JRN 202 News Reporting and Writing II (3)
JRN 312 Public Affairs Reporting (3)
JRN 318 Advanced Storytelling in Journalism (3)
Any two IMS Skills Courses (101 F, G, H, P, or V) or
        COM 211 Introduction to Electronic Media (4)
       Note: IMS 101P is a prerequisite for JRN 316

Analytical Courses
Any two of these:
COM 354 Media and Society (3)
COM 355 Media Technology (3)
COM 446 International Media (3)
JRN 301 Journalism Law and Ethics (3)
JRN 333 International Journalism (3)
POL 356 Mass Media and Politics (3)

Creative Courses
Any two of these:
JRN 303 Online Journalism (3)
JRN/ COM 313 Advanced Electronic Journalism: Audio (3)
JRN/ COM 314 Advanced Electronic Journalism: Video (3)
JRN 316 Introduction to News Presentation (3)
JRN 418 Critical Writing in Journalism (3)

One of these:
COM/ JRN 415 Practicum in Television Journalism (4)
COM/JRN/ POL 426 Inside Washington (hours vary)
JRN 421 Capstone in Journalism (3)

Internship (not required, but strongly encouraged for all majors)
JRN 340 Journalism Internship

Second Major
All journalism majors are required to complete a second major that is not in a media-related field. Examples of excluded majors include: technical and scientific communication (in English Dept.); mass communication; and strategic communication.

Latin American Studies: Bachelor of Arts

For information, contact the Latin American Studies Program, 120 MacMillan Hall (513-529-1958 or 513-529-5333)

Latin American Studies offer an interdisciplinary major and minor that explore Latin America from mutually enriching perspectives in the humanities, fine arts, social and physical sciences. Courses examine and analyze Latin American cultures, economies, social and political systems, literature, art, music, history, and geography across the hemisphere. Opportunities to study abroad and to engage with Latin American communities in Ohio promote the active application of international knowledge to issues vital to today's changing world.

Program Requirements (30 semester hours)

Three semester hours in each of two required categories. Additional credits here are counted toward the core courses requirement.

Introduction to Latin America
LAS 208 Latin American Civilization after 1825 (3)
SPN 362 Spanish American Cultural History (3)

Integrative Culmination of Latin American Studies
LAS 410 Current Latin American Issues (3)
LAS/ IES 414 Latin American Environmental Affairs (3)
LAS 415 Cuba in Revolution (4)
LAS/ POL 478 Media and Politics in Latin America and the Caribbean (3)
LAS 477 Independent Study Project (3-4)*

Core Courses
At least 18 semester hours from three different rubrics:
ATH 305 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America (3)
ATH 313 Introduction to South American Archaeology (4)
ATH/ LAS 325 Identity, Race, Gender, Class (3)
ATH 414 Caribbean Archaeology (3)
ATH 415 Caribbean Archaeology: Field and Laboratory Methods (6)
ATH 416 Archaeological Site Analysis (in Latin America) (3)
GEO 304 Latin American Development (3)
GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3)
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment
HST 307 Latin American Civilization (Before 1820) (3)
HST 487 Mexico Since 1810 (3)
HST 488 Colonial Spanish America (3)
LAS 207 Latin American Civilization before 1825 (3)
LAS/ ENG 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas (3)
LAS/ HST 260 Latin America in the United States (3)
LAS 277,377,477 Independent Study*
LAS 277X Service Learning (1 credit, taken with any MPF course)**
LAS 315 Latin American Diaspora Communities and Issues (3)
LAS/ HST 319 Revolution in Latin America (3)
LAS 385 Interdisciplinary Brazil (3)
POL 337 Politics of Latin America (4)
POL 378 Latin America: The Region and the World (3)
POL 430E Seminar on Comparative Political Systems: Latin America (4)
POR 383 Luso-Brazilian Women Writers in Translation (3)
SPN 315 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3)
SPN 361 Spanish American Cultural History I (3)
SPN 430 Selected Topics in Literature and Culture: Spanish America (3)
SPN 450 Topics in Hispanic Literature and Language (3)
SPN 461 Studies in Spanish American Narrative (3)
SPN 462 Studies in Modern Spanish American Drama (3)
SPN 463 Studies in Spanish American Poetry (3)
SPN 464 Studies in Spanish American Essay (3)
SPN 482 Spanish Dialectology (3)
SPN 490 Issues in Hispanic Literature (3)
(Latin American topic required)

Related Courses (up to three semester hours)
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3)
ATH 185 Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (3)
ATH/ ITS 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
ATH 312 Introduction to North American Archaeology (4)
BLS 464 International Business Law (3)
BUS 371 International Business (3)
BUS 373 International Business in Focus (3)
COM 446 International Mass Communication (3)
ECO 342 Comparative Economic Systems (3)
ECO 344 International Economic Relations (3)
ECO 347 Economic Development (3)
ECO 441 International Trade and Commercial Policy (3)
ECO 442 International Monetary Relations (3)
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (3)
ENG 348 Ethnic American Literature (3)
FIN 417 International Business Finance (3)
FSW 206 Social Welfare: Impact on Diverse Groups (4)
FSW 381 Parent-Child Relations in Diverse Families (3)
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3)
GEO 111 World Regional Geography (3)
GEO 378 Political Geography (4)
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization (3)
HST 361 History of Colonial America (3)
HST 371 Native American History (3)
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3)
ITS 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
MGT 304 Cross-Cultural Management (3)
MUS 185 World Music (3)
POL 270 Current World Problems (variable, maximum of six hours)
POL 271 World Politics (4)
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Politics (3)
POL 381 Global Governance (3)
POL 382 International Law (3)
POL 386 Global Competition (3)
POL 439 North American Politics: Unity and Diversity (3)
SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 371 Social Stratification (3)

Language Requirement
FRE 301 Introduction to French Literature and Culture
POR 311 Composition and Conversational Portuguese (3)
SPN 311 Grammar Review and Introductory Composition (3)
Complete SPN 202, POR 211, FRE 202, or their equivalents, and take three semester hours of a second language selected from SPN, POR, or FRE.

* Independent Study: Students who have completed at least three credits of LAS program requirements or core courses may design an Independent Study in LAS, working with a member of the LAS Faculty Advisory Committee.
** Service Learning: Students are encouraged to participate in service learning for 1-3 credits, or as non-credit volunteer work, in Ohio or abroad.

Study Abroad
The LAS Program highly values study abroad in all Latin American contexts and will extend credit by petition to international study experiences that fulfill program criteria

New courses
New courses, one-time only courses, sections of variable content courses, and other that relate to Latin America may be recognized by petition for credit toward appropriate categories.

Linguistics: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of English, 356 Bachelor Hall (513-529-5221).

Program Requirements (44-52 semester hours)

Core Courses (16-18 semester hours)

Both of these:
CSA 151 Computers, Computer Science, and Society (3)
ATH/ENG/ SPN 303 Introduction to Linguistics (4) or
        GER 309 Introduction to Linguistics (4)

Three courses from these:
CSA 174 Structured Programming and Computer Algorithms (3)
CSA 473 Automata, Formal Languages, and Computability (3)
ENG 301 History of the English Language (4)
ENG 302 Structure of Modern English (4)
ENG 405 Advanced Linguistics (3)*
ENG 406 Discourse Analysis: Speech Acts in Context (3)*
SPN 481 Spanish Phonology and Syntax (3)
SPN 482 Spanish Dialectology (3)
SPN 483 History of the Spanish Language (3)
GER 471 Applied German Linguistics (3)*

* Capstone course

Related Courses I (13-15 semester hours)

Five courses from these. No more than two courses may be taken from one department. Courses not counted in the Core Courses may be applied.
ATH 265 Language and Culture (3)
CIT 154 Personal Computer Concepts and Applications (3)
COM 337 Intercultural Communications (3)
CSA 274 Data Structures (3)
CSA 283 Data Communication and Networks (3)
CSA 474 Language, Interface, and Their Processors (3)
CSA 486 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3)
ENG 201 Language Awareness (3)
ENG 202 Varieties of English: Dialect Diversity and Language (3)
ENG 410 Topics in Linguistics (3)
FRE 341 Conversation and Current Events in France (3)
FRE 361 French Pronunciation (3)
GER 304 Pronunciation of German (2)
GER 331 German Grammar (3)
PSY 374 Psychology of Language and Thought (3)
SPA 223 Language Development (3)
SPA 248 American Sign Language (3)`
SPA 334 Phonetics (3)
SPN 311 Grammar Review and Composition (3)
SPN 312 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3)
SPN 408, 409 Intermediate Spanish Composition (3, 3)
SPN 446 Second Language Acquisition: Spanish (3)
SPN 447 Advanced Spanish Composition (3)

Related Courses II (15-19 semester hours)

Five courses from these. No more than two courses may be taken from one department. Courses not counted in Related Courses I may be applied.
ATH 425 Ethnographic Field Methods (3)
COM 333 Introduction to Communication Research (3)
COM 335 Rhetorical Theory in Western Thought (3)
COM 434 Non-Verbal Communication (3)
EDT 333 Teaching Foreign Language K-12, I (3)
EDT 334 Teaching Foreign Language K-12, II (3)
MTH 483 Introduction to Formal Systems and Mathematical Logic (3)
PHL 273 Formal Logic (4)
PHL 373 Symbolic Logic (4)
PSY 271 Cognitive Psychology (3)
PSY 372 Learning and Cognition (4)
PSY 470 Seminar in Cognition (3)
SOC 262 Research Methods (4)
SOC 362 Applied Sociological Research (3)
Any course above 300 level and taught in a foreign language

Mass Communication: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the mass communication area of the Department of Communication, 120 Williams Hall (513-529-3521).

Mass communication is a field of inquiry that examines the processes, institutions, and effects of the media as they function in national and international contexts. The general goals of this curriculum are threefold: 1. to develop students' competence in the critique of communication practices, 2. to increase students' appreciation of the history of media communication, and 3. to understand its impact on policies, institutions, and culture. Students study a broad range of media issues, including critical and cultural studies, communication technology and policy analysis, international communication, gender and sexuality issues, ethnic and minority studies, and more. In addition, students experience how to put this knowledge into practice in various forms of media production.

Special Admission Requirements

Enter the program as a pre-communication major and take these three courses:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

Students may apply for admission to the major (which is selective) after taking the three pre-major courses and completing 30 hours. Admission is determined on the following criteria:

  • cumulative g.p.a.
  • pre-major g.p.a.
  • qualifying exam over COM 134, 135, and 143

The same criteria for admission apply to transfer students.

Major Degree Requirements (49 semester hours)

Program Contexts
This major has three context or focus areas: Media Production, Media Criticism, and Media Institutions. You must have written approval from your adviser for your specific context area.

Program Requirements: Media Production

The objective of this context is to impart a broad understanding of the production of media. This involves understanding the basic principles underlying the use of symbolic codes, including areas such as composition, editing, lighting, and sound recording and processing. Areas to be covered include visual and aural aesthetics, writing, scripting, and planning; executing and evaluating; critical textual analysis; genre and style; and ethical use of the media.

Pre-Major Courses
All of these:

COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

Mass Communication Theory and Contexts
These two:
COM 146 Media Aesthetics (3)
COM 211 Introduction to Media Production (4)

Two of these:
COM 205 American Film as Communication (3)
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 215 Electronic Media History (3)
COM 354 Media and Society (3)
COM 355 Media Technology (3)
COM 445 Seminar in Mass Communication Law (3)
COM 447 Mass Media Criticism (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval) (3)

Research and Reasoning
One of these:
COM 353 Audience Analysis (3)
COM 354 Media and Society (3)
COM 414 Senior Project (with adviser approval) (4)
COM 447 Mass Media Criticism (3)

Culture and Diversity
One of these:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 247 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 282 Sexuality and Film (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
COM 441 Rhetoric of Religion (3)
COM 446 International Mass Communication (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval) (3)
COM 461 Gender and the Media (3)

Media Production Context Specialization
Three of these:
COM 257 Writing for Electronic Media: Scriptwriting (3)
COM 258 Writing for Electronic Media: Copywriting (3)
COM 267 Practicum in Media Production (3)
COM 311 Television Production and Direction: Field Production (3)
COM 312 Television Production and Direction: Studio Production (3)
COM 314 Advanced Electronic Journalism (3)
COM 411/ IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (4)
COM 414 Senior Project (with adviser approval) (4)
COM 415 Practicum in Television Journalism: Video (3)
COM 421 Screenwriting Workshop (3)
COM 440 Practicum: Mass Media Advertising and Public Relations (4)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (3) (with adviser approval)
COM 467 Practicum in Media Production (4)
JRN 202 News Writing and Reporting for Electronic Media (3)

Elective
Take one additional COM course (3)

Note: You may count a course in one category only.

Related Hours

Select nine hours from these:
ART 257 Photography (3)
ART 357 Photography II (3)
ART 358 Photography III (3)
ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Fiction and Poetry (3)
ENG 320 Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction (3, maximum 6)
FST 201 Introduction to Film Criticism and History (3)
FST 220 Literature and Film (3)
FST 221 Shakespeare and Film (3)
FST 235 Classics of Film (3)
FST 236 Alternative Traditions in Film (3)
FST 250 History and Popular Culture (3)
FST 252 Representation of History in Film and Video (3)
FST 261 A Survey of German Cinema (3)
FST 262 Italian Cinema (3)
FST 263 Soviet Cinema (3)
FST 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture (3)
FST 350 Topics in Film (3)
FST 366 French Cinema in Translation (3)
FST 401 Seminar in Film Study (3)
FST 415 Cuba in Revolution: Its History, Politics, and Culture (4)
FST 460 Topics in French Cinema (3)
HST 252 Representation of History in Film and Video (3)
IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (3)
IMS 410 Digital Development Methods: Theory and Practice (4)
JRN 101 Introduction to Journalism (3)
JRN 202 News Writing and Reporting for Electronic Media (3)
MUS 303 Electronic Music (3)
PHL 241 Aesthetics (4)
PHL 470 Advanced Aesthetics (4)
THE 200 Production and Performance Practicum (1, maximum 8)
THE 202 Stagecraft (3)
THE 204 Stagecraft Lab (1)
THE 252 Technical Production (3)
THE 253 Costume Fundamentals (3)
THE 254 Lighting Fundamentals (3)
THE 314 Playwriting (4)

Program Requirements: Media Criticism

Courses in this area are designed to give the student an understanding of how and why the mass media operate and function as they do. In this program, students develop competence in criticizing communication practices; understanding media history, aesthetics, and the social, economic, political and cultural aspects of production. Issues covered include: critical methods, genres, audiences, effects, and screenwriting. This theoretical, methodological, and historical course work may be applied to all areas of media practice. This focus may suit students who desire to go on to advanced work in media studies or to prepare for graduate work in any number of fields.

Pre-Major Courses
All of these:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

Mass Communication Theory and Contexts
These two:
COM 146 Media Aesthetics (3)
COM 211 Introduction to Media Production (4)

Two of these:
COM 205 American Film as Communication (3)
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 215 Electronic Media History (3)
COM 354 Media and Society (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval) (3)

Research and Reasoning
One of these:
COM 353 Audience Analysis (3)
COM 354 Media and Society (3)
COM 414 Senior Project (with adviser approval) (4)
COM 447 Mass Media Criticism (3)

Culture and Diversity
One of these:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 247 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 282 Sexuality and Film (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
COM 441 Rhetoric of Religion (3)
COM 446 International Mass Communication (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval) (3)
COM 461 Gender and the Media (3)

Media Criticism Context Specialization
Three of these:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 257 Writing for Electronic Media: Scriptwriting (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 282 Sexuality and Film (3)
COM 353 Audience Analysis (3)
COM 355 Media Technology (3)
COM 414 Senior Project (4) (with adviser approval)
COM 421 Creative Writing: Screenwriting (3)
COM 446 International Mass Communication (3)
COM 447 Mass Media Criticism (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval)
COM 461 Gender and the Media (3)

Elective
Take one additional COM course (3)
Note: You may count a course in one category only.

Related Hours
Select nine hours from these:
AMS 206 Approaches to American Culture (3)
ART 282 Art and Politics: The Body in Art (3)
EDL 334 Youth Subcultures: Popular Culture and the Non-Formal Education (3)
ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Fiction and Poetry (3)
ENG 298 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies (3)
ENG 320 Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction (3, maximum 6)
ENG 370 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory (3, maximum 6)
ENG 420 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction Workshop (3, maximum 6)
FST 201 Introduction to Film Criticism and History (3)
FST 220 Literature and Film (3)
FST 221 Shakespeare and Film (3)
FST 235 Classics of Film (3)
FST 236 Alternative Traditions in Film (3)
FST 250 History and Popular Culture (3)
FST 252 Representation of History in Film and Video (3)
FST 261 A Survey of German Cinema (3)
FST 262 Italian Cinema (3)
FST 263 Soviet Cinema (3)
FST 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture (3)
FST 350 Topics in Film (3)
FST 366 French Cinema in Translation (3)
FST 401 Seminar in Film Study (3)
FST 415 Cuba in Revolution: Its History, Politics, and Culture (4)
FST 460 Topics in French Cinema (3)
HST 250 History and Popular Culture (3)
HST 251 Gender and Third World Film (3)
HST 252 Representation of History in Film and Video (3)
IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (3)
JRN 101 Introduction to Journalism (3)
JRN 202 News Writing and Reporting for Electronic Media (3)
PHL 241 Aesthetics (4)
PHL 331 Political Philosophy (4)
PHL 470 Advanced Aesthetics (4)
POL 303 Modern Political Philosophy (4)
POL 346 Global Gender Politics (3)
POL 356 Mass Media and Politics (3)
SOC 272 Women and Popular Culture (4)
THE 314 Playwriting (4)
THE 391 Modern American Theatre (3)
THE 392 Modern European Theatre (3)
THE 393 Cultural, Ethnic, and Gender Issues in Dramatic Literature (3)

Program Requirements: Media Institutions

Within this focus students should gain knowledge of the significance of overall patterns of media ownership and control within the context of an awareness of other important sources of power and influence within the media. In this program, students develop expertise in the determinants of national and international media practice: ownership and control; media institutions; the state, law and policy; self-regulation by the media; economic determinants; audience construction and use; media personnel; organization of production practices; and technology.

Pre-Major Courses
All of these:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

Mass Communication Theory and Contexts
These three:
COM 146 Media Aesthetics (3)
COM 211 Introduction to Media Production (4)
COM 215 Electronic Media History (3)

One of these:
COM 301 Journalism Law and Ethics (3)
COM 339 Organizational Communication (3)
COM 354 Media and Society (3)
COM 443 Seminar in Electronic Media Management and Economics (3)
COM 445 Seminar in Mass Communication Law (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval) (3)

Research and Reasoning
One of these:
COM 353 Audience Analysis (3)
COM 354 Media and Society (3)
COM 414 Senior Project (with adviser approval) (4)
COM 447 Mass Media Criticism (3)

Culture and Diversity
One of these:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 247 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 282 Sexuality and Film (3)
COM 354 Media and Society (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
COM 441 Rhetoric of Religion (3)
COM 446 International Mass Communication (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval) (3)
COM 461 Gender and the Media (3)

Media Institutions Context Specialization
Three of these:
COM 258 Writing for the Electronic Media: Copywriting (3)
COM 259 Introduction to Public Relations (3)
COM 301 Journalism Law and Ethics (3)
COM 353 Audience Analysis (3)
COM 355 Media Technology (3)
COM 411/ IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (4)
COM 414 Senior Project (with adviser approval) (4)
COM 426 Inside Washington (4)
COM 438 Political Communication (3)
COM 440 Practicum: Mass Media Advertising and Public Relations
COM 443 Seminar in Electronic Media Management and Economics (3)
COM 446 International Mass Communication (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval)

Elective
Take one additional COM course (3)
Note: You may count a course in one category only.

Related Hours
Choose a total of nine hours from these:
ACC 221 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3)
ACC 222 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
HST 250 History and Popular Culture (3)
HST 252 Representation of History in Film and Video (3)
JRN 101 Introduction to Journalism (3)
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3)
MKT 325 Consumer Behavior (4)
MKT 435 Branding and Integrated Marketing Communication (4)
MGT 111 Introduction to Business (3)
MGT 291 Organizational Behavior and Theory (3)
MGT 303 Human Resource Management (3)
POL 248 Urban and Community Politics (4)
POL 303 Modern Political Philosophy (4)
POL 307 Public Opinion Laboratory (2)
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Politics (3)
POL 333 Politics of Western Europe (4)
POL 345 National Issues (3)
POL 346 Global Gender Politics (3)
POL 351 Criminal Justice (4)
POL 352 Constitutional Law and Politics (4)
POL 353 Constitutional Rights and Liberties (4)
POL 354 Political Parties and the Election Process (3)
POL 355 Public Opinion and Political Behavior (3)
POL 356 Mass Media and Politics (3)
POL 381 Global Governance (3)
SOC 412 Sociology of Law (3)

Notes on Curriculum:

  • Students are required to take at least three major courses at 400 level.
  • COM 146 is a prerequisite for all production and writing courses
  • COM 167 is designed for pre-majors or non-majors as a preview of practicum experience, Entry is limited.
  • COM 177, 277, 340, 377, and 477 may count toward hours needed for graduation, but not normally toward specific mass communication curriculum requirements.
  • COM 167 and 367 may count toward hours needed to graduate, but may not be used to satisfy theory and context or context specialization requirements.

Mathematics and Statistics: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science

For information contact the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, 123 Bachelor Hall (513-529-5818).

Two degrees are offered: Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. For the Bachelor of Science, choose one of three majors: mathematics, statistics, or mathematics and statistics. The A.B. requires all sections of the College of Arts and Science Requirement (CAS), while the B.S. has only the language requirement. Each program has the related hours requirement. All courses taken from the department and applied to your program, and all courses in the 12-hour section of the related hours, should be taken for grades, not credit/no-credit. In the courses taken from the department, your g.p.a. must be at least 2.00. Service courses do not figure into your g.p.a. unless explicitly approved by the department.

Program Requirements: Bachelor of Arts

This program requires at least 19 semester hours in MTH or STA courses numbered 300 or above with at least 16 hours at the 400 level, and must include:

A calculus sequence ending with one of these:
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
MTH 252H Honors Calculus III (4)

One of these:
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 222T Introduction to Linear Algebra (Honors) (2)

A course chosen from one of these three lines:
MTH 421 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4)
MTH 441 Real Analysis (3) or
        MTH 451 Introduction to Complex Variables (3)
MTH 491 Introduction to Topology (3)

A course chosen from one of these five lines:
MTH 432 Optimization (3)
MTH 437 Game Theory and Related Topics (3) or
        MTH 438 Theory and Application of Graphs (3) or
        MTH 439 Combinatorics (3)
MTH 447 Topics in Mathematical Finance (3)
MTH 453 Numerical Analysis (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)

At least one more course from the eight previous lines. This course must lie on a line different from the previous two choices.

Additional courses that count in the 19-advanced hour requirement are those in the above lists together with MTH 331, 347, 410, 411, 413, 420, 422, 425 (MPC), 435 (MPC), 440, 442, 454, 470, 483, 492; STA 462, 463, 466, 467, 483, 484, 486.

Students in the Bachelor of Science in Education Integrated Mathematics Program who complete all of MTH 408, MTH 409, and MTH 482 may count three hours toward the 400 level hours required in the AB.

Program Requirements: Bachelor of Science

Three majors, mathematics, statistics, and mathematics and statistics, are offered for this degree. Each requires the following introductory courses:

A calculus sequence ending with one of these:
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
MTH 252H Honors Calculus III (4)

One of these:
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 222T Introduction to Linear Algebra (Honors) (2)

Major in Mathematics: Bachelor of Science

This program requires at least 28 semesterhours of MTH and STA courses at the 300 level or above with at least 22 hours at the 400 level.

Theory courses. Both of these:
MTH 421 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4)
MTH 441 Real Analysis (3)

At least two of these:
MTH 411 Foundations of Geometry (3)
MTH 422 Linear Algebra and Fields (4)
MTH 438 Theory and Application of Graphs (3)
MTH 442 Real Analysis (3)
MTH 451 Introduction to Complex Variables (3)
MTH 483 Introduction to Mathematical Logic (3)
MTH 486 Introduction to Set Theory (3)
MTH 491 Introduction to Topology (3)

Applications courses. At least two of these:
MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)
MTH 432 Optimization (3)
MTH 437 Game Theory and Related Topics (3)
MTH 439 Combinatorics (3)
MTH 447 Topics in Mathematical Finance (3)
MTH 453 Numerical Analysis (3)

Electives:
Additional courses to complete the 28 required hours may be chosen from lists above or from MTH 331, 410, 413, 420, 425 (MPC), 435 (MPC), 440, 454, 470, 482 (MPC), 492, STA 401, 462. At most, two of the 28 hours may be from 430 or independent studies.

Major in Statistics: Bachelor of Science

The program requires at least 29 hours of STA courses at the 300 level or above.

Statistics courses. All of these:
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)
STA 402 Statistical Programming (3)
STA 462 Inferential Statistics (3)
STA 463 Regression Analysis (4)
STA 466 Experimental Design Methods (4)

At least three of these:
STA 333 Nonparametric Statistics (3)
STA 365 Statistical Quality Control (3)
STA 432 Survey Sampling in Business (3)
STA 467 Multivariate Analysis (3)
STA 475 Data Analysis Practicum (MPC) (3)
STA 483 Analysis of Forecasting Systems (3)
STA 484 Analysis of Categorical Data (3)

Note: Students with previous credit for STA 261 may not take STA 301 and must take additional hours from the electives list to complete the 29 required hours.

Major in Mathematics and Statistics: Bachelor of Science

The program requires at least 31 semester hours of MTH and STA courses at 300 level or above with at least 22 hours from MTH and STA courses at the 400 level.

Mathematics courses. All of these:
MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)
MTH 421 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4)
MTH 441 Real Analysis (3) or
MTH 451 Introduction to Complex Variables(3)

At least one of these:
MTH 432 Optimization (3)
MTH 437 Game Theory and Related Topics (3)
MTH 438 Theory and Applications of Graphs (3)
MTH 439 Combinatorics (3)
MTH 447 Topics in Mathematical Finance (3)
MTH 453 Numerical Analysis (3)

Statistics courses. All of these:
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)
STA 463 Regression Analysis (4)

At least one of these:
STA 462 Inferential Statistics (3)
STA 466 Experimental Design Methods (4)

Electives:
Additional courses to complete the 31 required hours from lists above or from MTH 331, 410, 411, 413, 420, 422, 425 (MPC), 435 (MPC), 440, 442, 454, 470, 482 (MPC), 483, 486, 491, 492; STA 402, 467, 475 (MPC), 483, 484. At most, two of the 31 hours may be from 430 or independent studies.

Important Note:
Students with previous credit for STA 261 may not take STA 301 and must take additional hours from the electives list to complete the 31 required hours.

Related Hours

A program of related courses is intended to provide the student with opportunities to see and do mathematics or statistics in the context of other disciplines and, perhaps, enhance the student's employment prospects. The departmental requirement is for a program of at least 15 hours. Each program includes:

  • A computer programming course, CSA 153, 157, 163, 174, or any CSA course with one of these as a prerequisite.
  • At least 12 semester hours in one subject area with at least six hours at 300 level or above (200 or above in chemistry, physics, engineering, or computer science and systems analysis)

You may elect to design your own program of related courses. Such programs must be approved by the chief departmental adviser in advance of applying for graduation. For a list of pre-approved programs of related courses and those that include a thematic sequence, see the chief departmental adviser.

Teacher Licensure

Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with a major in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics should apply for admission to a licensure cohort as outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter. For information, contact the Office of Student Services in the School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6418).

To earn an A.B. degree in addition to teacher licensure, you must complete the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree as stated earlier, while also satisfying your professional education course requirements. As a consequence, the following courses (not all of which apply toward the A.B.) are automatically required to be in your academic program:

These courses must include:
MTH 331 Discrete Mathematics (3)
MTH 408 Mathematical Problem Solving With Technology (3)
MTH 409 Secondary Mathematics from an Advanced Perspective (3)
MTH 411 Foundations of Geometry (3)
MTH 421 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4)
MTH 482 Great Theorems of Mathematics (3)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)

Two additional courses are required for completion of the A.B. degree. See the A.B. requirements for details about the selection of those courses.

To earn a B.S. degree in addition to teacher licensure, you must complete the requirements for the B.S. in Mathematics or the B.S. in Mathematics and Statistics. Each of these programs requires four or five additional courses. See the B.S. requirements for details about the selection of these courses.

Microbiology: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Microbiology, 32 Pearson Hall (513-529-5422).

No course required for the major in microbiology may be taken on a credit/no-credit basis. MBI 275 and all 100-level microbiology courses can not be counted toward the g.p.a. or the 32 hours required for the major in microbiology.

Program Requirements (32 semester hours)

Core Courses (19 hours)
All of these:
MBI 201 General Microbiology I (4)
MBI 202 General Microbiology II (4)
MBI 365 Molecular and Cellular Biology (3)
MBI 425 Microbial Physiology (4)
MBI 445 Microbial Genetics (3)
MBI 490 Undergraduate Seminar (1)

Focus Courses (9 hours minimum)
Select at least two of these:
MBI 405 Pathogenic Microbiology (4)
MBI 415 Immunology Principles and Practice (4)
MBI 435 Medical Mycology (3)

or this course:
MBI 465 Microbial and Molecular Genetics Laboratory (2)

and additional Focus courses including:
MBI 414 Immunology Principles (3)
MBI 464 Human Viruses (3)
MBI 475 Microbial Ecology (3)
MBI 485 Principles of Bioinformatics (3)
MBI 495 Bacterial Cell Biology (3)

to total at least nine hours.
Note: Credit not given for both MBI 414 and MBI 415.

Elective Courses
Additional courses to complete the 32 required hours may be chosen from Focus courses or from the courses below:
MBI 361 Epidemiology (3)
MBI 402 Geomicrobiology (3)
MBI 424 Biological Instrumentation (3)
MBI 440 Research Problems (2)
MBI 466 Bioinformatics Computing Skills (3)
MBI 477 Independent Study (1-4)
MBI 480 Departmental Honors (1-3)

Note: MBI 440, 440C, 477, 477C, 480, and 480C have a maximum of four credit hours that can receive a standard grade.

Related Hours (19-23 hours)
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4) and
        CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (4) or
CHM 241, 242 Organic Chemistry (3, 3) and
        CHM 244, 245 Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5) or
        STA 261 Statistics (3)
PHY 171, 172 College Physics (3, 3) and
        PHY 183, 184 Introduction to Physics Laboratory (1, 1) or
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World (3, 3) and
        PHY 183, 184 Introduction to Physics Laboratory (1, 1)

Philosophy: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Philosophy, 212 Hall Auditorium (513-529-2440).

Program Requirements (30 semester hours)

Both of these:
PHL 301 Ancient Philosophy (4)
PHL 302 Modern Philosophy (4)

Additional courses in philosophy to total 30 semester hours. No more than 12 hours may be below 300 level, and at least two courses must be at 400 level (except PHL 401, 404, 405, 477, and 480). Choose these courses with your adviser.

Physics: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science

For information contact the Department of Physics, 133 Culler Hall (513-529-5625).

Miami offers both a Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) and a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in physics. The A.B. degree is for those students wishing to acquire a good background in physical science to complement work in other areas. The A.B. degree is especially well suited for persons desiring teacher licensure in physics and those preparing for careers in medicine, law, or business. The B.S. degree prepares students for graduate study or employment in physics or physics-related fields. Engineering physics is described earlier in this chapter.

Program Requirements: Bachelor of Arts (46-50 semester hours)

All of these:
MTH 151, 251 Calculus I, II (5, 4) or
        MTH 153, 251 Calculus I, II (4, 4) or
        MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World I, II (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 General Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
PHY 286 Introduction to Computational Physics (3)
PHY 291 Contemporary Physics (4)
PHY 292 Electronic Instrumentation (3)
PHY 293 Contemporary Physics Laboratory (2)
PHY 294 Laboratory in Electronic Instrumentation (2)

Three hours of physics courses numbered 300-399 (excluding PHY 311) or above 410 with written approval of your physics adviser

Ten hours of related courses with written approval from your physics adviser

Teacher Licensure

Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter. For information, contact the Office of Student Services in the School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6418).

Program Requirements: Bachelor of Science
(63-71 semester hours)

All of these:
MTH 151, 251 Calculus I, II (5, 4) or
MTH 153, 251 Calculus I, II (4, 4) or
MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World I, II (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
PHY 286 Introduction to Computational Physics (3)
PHY 291 Contemporary Physics (4)
PHY 292 Electronic Instrumentation (3)
PHY 293 Contemporary Physics Laboratory (2)
PHY 294 Laboratory in Electronic Instrumentation (2)
PHY 341 Mathematical Methods in Physics (4)
PHY 437 Intermediate Thermodynamics and Introduction to Statistical Physics (4)
PHY 451 Classical Mechanics (4)
PHY 461 Electromagnetic Theory (4)
PHY 491 Introduction to Quantum Physics I (4)

One advanced laboratory course from these:
PHY 420 Advanced Laboratory Physics (4)
PHY 423 Materials Physics (4)
PHY 441 Optics and Laser Physics (4)
PHY 442 Spectroscopy of Atoms and Molecules (4)
PHY 471 Advanced Electronics (3)

Two courses from these:
PHY 421 Introduction to Biophysics (4)
PHY 435 Introduction to Astrophysics (4)
PHY 488 Research Capstone in Physics (3)
PHY 490S Topics in Physics Seminar (3)
PHY 492 Introduction to Quantum Physics II (3)
Advanced laboratory courses not used to fulfill the advanced laboratory requirement

Advising tracks (recommended, not required):
Atmospheric science: AER 118 (3); MME 313 (3); MTH 347 (3)
Materials: PHY 423 (4), PHY 437 (4); MME 223 (3); CHM 141-145 (10)
Mathematical physics: MTH 347 (3) and two other advanced MTH courses
Optics: PHY 441 (4), PHY 442 (4)
Physics, graduate school: PHY 492 (3)

Political Science: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Political Science, 218 Harrison Hall (513-529-2000).

This major is for liberal arts students interested in the study of politics and government. For this major, at least 17 of the required 34 major hours and at least nine of the required 18 related hours must be from Miami. Required political science and related hours may not be taken on a credit/no-credit basis. A g.p.a. of at least 2.00 is required for political science courses as well as related hours.

Program Requirements (at least 34 semester hours)

Choose political science hours from the following major fields: political theory, comparative politics, American government, public administration, international politics, with the following requirements:

This one:
POL 241 American Political System (4)

At least two of these:
POL 201 Political Thinking (4)
POL 221 Modern World Governments (4)
POL 261 Public Administration (4)
POL 271 International Politics (4)

Advanced courses:
In consultation with your faculty adviser, select at least 19 additional semester hours from other courses in political science at 300 level or above, with at least one course selected from two of the five major fields listed above.

Related Hours (18 required)
  1. Take a total of 18 hours from cognated disciplines including:
    AMS, ATH, BUS, COM, ECO, GEO, GTY, HST, ITS, LAS, PHL, PSY, REL, SOC, WMS;
    or AES 221, 222, 431, or 432; NSC 202, 311, 401, or 402.
  2. At least 12 hours must be at the 200 level or higher.
  3. A minimum 2.00 g.p.a. in all related hours is required.

Important Note:
Students pursuing another major or minor in the department may not also pursue the Political Science major. However, students may double major in Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs and Public Administration. Please note that because these two majors are in the same department, their completion will not satisfy the thematic sequence requirement of the Miami Plan.

Psychology: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Psychology, 100 Psychology Building (513-529-2400).

You must have at least a 2.00 cumulative g.p.a. for all psychology courses attempted and for which a letter grade has been earned. All courses used to satisfy basic departmental requirements must be taken for a letter grade.

Departmental Honors

To receive departmental honors, you must complete PSY 480 Independent Reading for Department Honors (minimum 4; maximum 6) and have a cumulative g.p.a. of 3.25. PSY 400 Senior Thesis in Psychology (1-5; maximum 6) is recommended.

Recommended Courses of Study

This department offers a single major; all majors are encouraged to take a variety of courses in psychology. For flexible career planning, the department suggests courses of study consistent with your career goals. Choose those courses with your academic adviser. As long as you fulfill the Basic Departmental Requirements, your plan of study need not coincide exactly with any of those specified below.

Program Requirements

All of these:
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4)
Statistics courses: STA 261 (4), and PSY 293 (4) or STA 363 (3)
Methods course: PSY 294 (4)

At least one course from each of these groups:
Biopsychology: PSY 251 or 351 or 356
Cognitive: PSY 271 or 273 or 372 or 373 or 374 or 375 or 470
Developmental: PSY 231 or 332 or 333 or 334 or 430
Individual: PSY 241 or 242 or 343 or 345 or 347
Social: PSY 221 or 324 or 325 or 326 or 327 or 328 or 420

Additional requirements:

  • Minimum of two 300-level and two 400-level courses.
  • One approved topic sequence (a list of sequences is available through the department).
  • Additional courses to make up minimum total of 36 semester hours in psychology

Public Administration: Bachelor of Arts

Note: The Department of Political Science is currently revising the requirements for the major. For information contact the Department of Political Science, 218 Harrison Hall (513-529-2000).

This major is for students interested in understanding more about the link between politics and public policy. It is appropriate for those interested in public service careers, including federal, state, or local government; city management and urban planning; international organizations; nonprofit institutions; and government relations work in private firms. This major prepares students for professional and graduate school.

At least half of the required semester hours in the Public Administration Core and half of the required semester hours in the Related Hours must be from Miami. Required hours in the Core and Related Hours may not be taken credit/no-credit; however, hours in excess of those required may be taken credit/no-credit. A g.p.a. of at least 2.00 is required in the Core as well as in the Related Hours courses.

Program Requirements

Public Administration Core (34 semester hours)

Core requirement. All of these:
POL 241 American Political System (4)
POL 261 Public Administration (4)*
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
* POL 261 is prerequisite for 300/400-level courses in Public Administration.

Core elective. Twelve semester hours from these:
ACC 468 Accounting for Governmental Organizations (2)
ACC 469 Accounting for Non-Governmental/Not-For-Profit Organizations (1)
ECO 331 Public Sector Economics (3)
POL 362 Administrative Politics and Decision Making (3)
POL 363 Administrative Law (3)
POL 364 Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations (3)
POL 460 Seminar on Public Administration and Policy Analysis (4)
POL 467 Public Budgeting (3)
POL 468 Public Personnel Administration (3)
SOC 454 Formal Organization (3)

Quantitative core. This one:
POL 306 Applied Research Methods (3)

Required Capstones (for seniors; require concurrent registration):
POL 406 Public Policy Analysis Lab (2)
POL 466 Public Policy Analysis (3)

Related Hours (15 semester hours)

Note: Courses used to meet requirements in Public Administration Core may not count toward Related Hours.

Fifteen (15) semester hours from these:
ACC 468 Accounting for Governmental Organizations (2)
ACC 469 Accounting for Non-Governmental/Not-For-Profit Organizations (1)
ECO 331 Public Sector Economics (3)
ECO 435 Urban and Regional Economics (3)
GEO 451 Urban and Regional Planning (3)
GEO 454 Urban Geography (3)
GEO 459 Advanced Urban and Regional Planning (3)
MGT 291 Organizational Behavior and Theory (3)
MGT 402 Legal Environment of Personnel and Labor Relations (3)
MGT 404 Compensation Management (3)
MGT 405 Management-Union Relations (3)
POL 307 Public Opinion Laboratory (2)
POL 345 National Issues (3)
POL 351 Criminal Justice (4)
POL 352 Constitutional Law and Politics (4)
POL 353 Constitutional Rights and Liberties (4)
POL 355 Public Opinion and Political Behavior (3)
POL 356 Mass Media and Politics (3)
POL 362 Administrative Politics and Decision Making (3)
POL 363 Administrative Law (3)
POL 364 Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations (3)
POL 460 Seminar on Public Administration and Policy Analysis (4)
POL 467 Public Budgeting (3)
POL 468 Public Personnel Administration (3)
PSY 221 Social Psychology (3)
PSY 262 Business Psychology (3)
PSY 324 Advanced Social Psychology (3)
PSY 343 Psychopathology (3)
PSY 472 Advanced Social Psychology (3)
SOC 201 Social Problems (4)
SOC 202 Social Deviance (4)
SOC 257 Population (3)
SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 412 Sociology of Law (3)
SOC 413 Juvenile Delinquency (3)
SOC 414 Penology (3)
SOC 454 Formal Organization (3)

Courses appropriate for major, but not listed above, may be counted with written approval of your adviser.

Internships

Public administration internships (POL 340B) for majors are coordinated through the Center for Public Management and Regional Affairs, 2 Harrison Hall (513-529-6959). Internships provide an added dimension to your educational experience. For information consult the director of the center.

Religion: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Comparative Religion, 7 Old Manse (513-529-4300).

Program Requirements (24 semester hours)

REL 302 Methods for the Study of Religion (4)
At least 12 semester hours in religion at 300 level or above (including REL 302)
Additional courses in religion, chosen with your adviser

Note: No more than six semester hours at 100 level can count toward the major. REL 207 and 209 do not count toward the major; however, they may count as related hours.

Related Hours (18 required)

These should be chosen with your adviser; 10 of these hours must be 300-level or above.

Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of German, Russian, and East Asian Languages, 172 Irvin Hall (513-529-2526).

This interdisciplinary major allows students to study history and culture of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia, broadly defined as the territory of the former Soviet republics, from medieval times to today. Drawing from a range of disciplines and approaches, students have the opportunity to explore issues of political, social, and regional identity and cultural diversity, as well as official and popular culture. Students select a Language, Literature and Culture emphasis or a History and Politics emphasis.

Proficiency at the level of Russian 202 or above is required. Students are encouraged to attend the Miami summer Russian language workshop in Novgorod, Russia, the Miami summer Russian culture workshop in St. Petersburg, Russia, or an approved academic study program in Central Asia, the Caucasus, or Eastern Europe.

Program Requirements (36 semester hours)

Core requirements:

HST/POL/REL/ RUS 254 Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies (3)
RUS 201, 202 Intermediate Russian (3, 3)

Language, Literature, and Culture Emphasis (27 hours)

All of these:
RUS 301, 302 Advanced Russian (3, 3)
RUS 311 Readings in Russian (3)

Three of these:
RUS 137 Russian Folklore (3)
RUS 250 Topics in Russian Literature (3; maximum 9)
RUS 251 The East European Vampire Tradition in Folklore, History, and Literature (3)
RUS 253 Jewish Identity and Russian Literature (3)
RUS 255, 256, 257, 258 Russian Literature in English Translation (3, 3, 3, 3)
RUS/ FST 263 Soviet Cinema (3)
RUS 401 St. Petersburg: History, Literature, Culture (3)
RUS 411, 412 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3, 3)
RUS 450 Topics in Russian Culture (3, max. 9)
RUS 451 Golden Age of Russian Culture (3)
RUS/ FST 272 Cultures and Identities of Eastern Europe:
       An Introduction Through Literature and Film (3)
RUS 480 Departmental Honors (4-6)

Three of these:*
ARC 404 Architecture of Russia (3)
ATH/GEO/ RUS 306 Peoples and Cultures of Russia and Eurasia (3)
CLS 210Z Classical Tradition in Russian Poetry (3)
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (2)
HST/POL/RUS 230 Topics in Russian and Eurasian Studies (3)
HST 324 Eurasian Nomads and History (3)
HST 374 Russia to 1855 (3)
HST 375 Russia and the USSR from 1855 to the Present (3)
HST 378 20th Century Eastern European History (3)
HST 470 Topics in Russian History (3)
HST 475 Images of Russia at Home and Abroad (3)
HST 476 The Russian Revolution and the Early Soviet Regime, 1917-1924 (3)
ITS 402O Transition to Democracy in Eastern Europe and the Former USSR (3)
MGT 375 Organizational Management and Leadership in Russia (3)
MUS 188 Music of Russia (3)
POL 328 Politics of Central Asia (3)
POL 331 Development of the Russian Polity (3)
POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics (3)
POL 430B Political Systems of Russia and Eastern Europe (4)
POL 440 Havighurst Center Seminar: Topics in Russian and Eurasian Studies (3)
POL 488 Russia and the Republics (3)
REL/ RUS 133 Imagining Russia (2)
REL 235 Religions of Russia and Eurasia (3)
* or appropriate courses substituted with approval from your Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies adviser

History and Politics Emphasis (27 hours)

Two of these:
HST 324 Eurasian Nomads and History (3)
HST 374 Russia to 1855 (3)
HST 375 Russia and the USSR from 1855 to the Present (3)
HST 378 20th Century Eastern European History (3)
HST 470 Topics in Russian History (3)
HST 475 Images of Russia at Home and Abroad (3)
HST 476 The Russian Revolution and the Early Soviet Regime, 1917-1924 (3)

Two of these:
ITS 402O Transition to Democracy in Eastern Europe and the Former USSR (3)
POL 328 Politics of Central Asia (3)
POL 331 Development of the Russian Polity (3)
POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics (3)
POL 420 Gender, Citizenship, and Postcommunism (3)
POL 430B Political Systems of Russia and Eastern Europe (4)
POL 488 Russia and the Republics (3)

Two of these:
ATH/GEO/ RUS 306 Peoples and Cultures of Russia and Eurasia (3)
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (2)
HST/POL/RUS 230 Topics in Russian and Eurasian Studies (3)
MGT 375 Organizational Management and Leadership in Russia (3)
POL 440 Havighurst Center Seminar: Topics in Russian and Eurasian Studies (3)
REL 235 Religions of Russia and Eurasia (3)

Three of these:*
ARC 404 Architecture of Russia (3)
CLS 210Z Classical Tradition in Russian Poetry (3)
MUS 188 Music of Russia (3)
REL/ RUS 133 Imagining Russia (2)
RUS 137 Russian Folklore (3)
RUS 250 Topics in Russian Literature (3; maximum 9)
RUS 251 The East European Vampire Tradition in Folklore, History, and Literature (3)
RUS 253 Jewish Identity and Russian Literature (3)
RUS 255, 256, 257, 258 Russian Literature in English Translation (3, 3, 3, 3)
RUS/ FST 263 Soviet Cinema (3)
RUS/ FST 272 Cultures and Identities of Eastern Europe:
       An Introduction Through Literature and Film (3)
RUS 301, 302 Advanced Russian (3, 3)
RUS 311 Readings in Russian (3)
RUS 401 St. Petersburg: History, Literature, Culture (3)
RUS 411, 412 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3, 3)
RUS 450 Topics in Russian Culture (3, max. 9)
RUS 451 Golden Age of Russian Culture (3)
* or appropriate courses substituted with approval from your Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies adviser

Sociology: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Sociology and Gerontology, 375 Upham Hall (513-529-2628).

This major is for liberal arts students interested in the study of society, structures, social processes, and human interaction. These range from two-person interactions to relations between large social institutions to relations between nations.

All sociology majors must take a minimum of nine semester hours in sociology on the Oxford campus. Required sociology and related hours (excluding field work) may not be taken credit/no-credit; however, hours in excess of the required minimum may be taken credit/no-credit. A g.p.a. of at least 2.00 is required for this major, and only three hours of independent study may be included. Not all courses are offered each semester or year; consult with your sociology adviser before registering each semester.

Program Requirements: Basic Major (36 semester hours)

Note: All courses require SOC 151 or 152 as prerequisite except SOC 141, 205, 221, and 262, which require six semester hours of any social science. Prerequisite may be waived with permission of instructor. Credit cannot be granted for both SOC 151 and 152.

All of these:
SOC 151 Social Relations (4) or
SOC 152 Social Relations and U.S. Cultures (4)
SOC 262 Research Methodology (4)
SOC 372 Social Stratification (3)
SOC 482 Sociological Theory (4)
Additional hours in sociology to make up the 36 required hours.

Related hours:

Must take STA 261 after taking SOC 262

Elective hours.
Take at least 21 hours:
SOC 141 Multiculturalism in the U.S. (3)
SOC 201 Social Problems (4)
SOC 202 Social Deviance (4)
SOC 203 Sociology of Gender (3)
SOC 205 Comparative Sociology (3)
SOC 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3)
SOC 221 Human Sexuality (3)
SOC 257 Population (3)
SOC 258 Self and Society (3)
SOC 260A Internship: An Introduction to Applied Sociology and Human Services
SOC 272 Women and Popular Culture (4)

At least nine hours at or above the 300/400 level:
SOC 318 Sociology of Aging (3)
SOC 335 Sociology of Education (4)
SOC 337/338 Directed Research in European Studies (1-4, 1-4)
SOC 347 Urban Sociology (3)
SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 352 Criminology (3)
SOC 357 Medical Sociology (3)
SOC 358 Sociology of Mental Disorders (3)
SOC 361 Sociology of Families (3)
SOC 383 Sociology of Religion (3)
SOC 409/509 Systems of Justice (3)
SOC 410/510 Topics in Criminology (3)
SOC 411 Social Conflict (3)
SOC 412/512 Sociology of Law (3)
SOC 413/513 Juvenile Delinquency (3)
SOC 417/517 Economy and Society (3)
SOC 435/535 Sociology of Death (3)
SOC 440A Applied Field Research (1-16)
SOC 440C Field Experience in Sociology (4-16)
SOC 448 African American Experience (3)
SOC 454/554 Formal Organizations (3)
SOC 459 Sociology Capstone Experience (3)
SOC 462 Applied Sociological Research (3)
SOC 463/563 Gender and Aging (3)
SOC 470 Social/Political Activism (3)
SOC 480 Independent Reading for Departmental Honors (1-6)
SOC 490/590 Horizons in Sociology (1-3; max. 6)

Note: SOC 459 Sociology Capstone Experience (3) applies toward the minimum 36 semester hour requirement for the major.

Spanish: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, 268 Irvin Hall (513-529-4500).

No courses in Spanish may be taken credit/no-credit.

Program Requirements (36 semester hours)

Note: SPN 101, 102 Beginner's Course, SPN 111 Intensive Basic Spanish, and SPN 201, 202 Second Year Spanish do not count in the required 36 hours.

Required Courses

This one:
SPN 311 Grammar Review and Introductory Composition (3)

These two:
SPN 312 Introduction to Spanish Language/Linguistics (3)
SPN 315 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3)

One of the following sequences:
SPN 351, 352 Cultural History of Spain I, II (3, 3)
SPN 361, 362 Spanish American Cultural History I, II (3, 3)

Nine semester hours from the following (at least 6 hours at the 400/500 level
and at least 3 hours in literature):
SPN 420 Selected Topics in Literature and Culture: Spain (3)
SPN 430 Selected Topics in Literature and Culture: Spanish America (3)
SPN 440 Selected Topics in Language and Culture (3)
SPN 451/551 Studies in Spanish Narrative (3)
SPN 452/552 Studies in Spanish Poetry (3)
SPN 453/553 Studies in Spanish Theater (3)
SPN 454/554 Don Quijote (3)
SPN 461/561 Studies in Spanish American Narrative (3)
SPN 462/562 Studies in Modern Spanish American Drama (3)
SPN 463/563 Studies in Spanish American Poetry (3)
SPN 464/564 Studies in the Spanish American Essay (3)
SPN 481/581 Spanish Phonology and Syntax (3)
SPN 482/582 Spanish Dialectology (3)
SPN 483/583 Same History of the Spanish Language (3)
SPN 484/584 Second Language Acquisition: Spanish (3)

This one:
SPN 490 Senior Seminar/Capstone (3)

Nine semester hours from these:
SPN 316 Intermediate Spanish Composition (3)
SPN 317 Business Spanish (3)
SPN 342 Advanced Conversation (2)
SPN 381 Spanish Language and Hispanic Culture I (3)
SPN 382 Spanish Language and Hispanic Culture II (3)
(Other courses as added/approved)
Any cultural studies course, topics course, or 400/500 course not taken for the major.

Related Hours (17 required)

Eight hours of Portuguese:
POR 111 Accelerated Introduction to Portuguese (4)
POR 211 Second Year Portuguese (4)

Nine hours from the following.
May include any courses in another foreign language, ancient or modern, or any of these:

ATH 305 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America (3)
ATH 313 Introduction to South American Archaeology (3)
GEO 304 Latin American Development (4)
GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3)
HST 307, 308 Latin America from Discovery to the Present (3, 3)
HST 487 Mexico Since 1810 Revolution (4)
HST 488 Colonial Spanish America (4)
POL 337 Politics of Latin America (3)
POL 378 Latin America: Region and the World (3)
POL 478 Media and Politics in Latin America and the Caribbean (MPC) (3)
REL 317 Religions of Meso-America (3)
THE 391 Modern American Theatre (3)
THE 392 Modern European Theatre (3)
THE 491 Theatre History: Classic through Neo-Classic (3)
THE 492 Theatre History: Restoration through Late 19th Century (3)
THE 493 American Theatre (3)
Any Latin American Studies course
Any literature course in the English department

Students with specific needs can work out other plans of related hours with their advisers. A second major substitutes for the 17 related hours.

Teacher Licensure

Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as outlined in the School of Education , Health and Society chapter. For information, contact the Office of Student Services in the School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6418).

Speech Communication: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the speech communication area of the Department of Communication, 160 Bachelor Hall (513-529-7171).

Speech communication is the study of how our sense of social and individual reality is created through human communication processes. Through in-depth study of communication theories, methodologies, and contexts, we explore how communication is included in the development, maintenance, and termination of relationships in interpersonal, small group, organizational, and public contexts. Specific focus options are described in Program Options below.

Special Admission Requirements

Enter the program as a pre-communication major and take these three courses:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

Students may apply for admission to the major (which is selective) after taking the three pre-major courses and after completing 30 hours. Admission is determined on the following criteria: cumulative g.p.a.; pre-major g.p.a.; and the qualifying exam over COM 134, 135, and 143. The same criteria for admission apply to transfer students.

Internship

Qualified speech communication majors are encouraged to participate in internships. Speech communication area faculty select internship recipients; criteria include, but are not restricted to, g.p.a. (minimum 2.75 overall and 3.00 in all classes taken for the major), academic preparation for the particular internship, junior or senior standing, and faculty recommendations. Internship application procedures should be completed by April 15 for summer and fall semesters and November 15 for spring semester. Speech communication area faculty are not obligated to provide all students with internships.

Program Options

This major has three areas of focus: interpersonal/relational communication, organizational communication, and rhetorical influence. Each leads to the A.B. with a major in speech communication. You must have written approval from your adviser for your specific area of focus.

Program Requirements: Interpersonal/Relational Communication

The objective of this focus is to create a detailed understanding of how people use verbal and nonverbal communication to define, negotiate, and change their relationships. This focus increases awareness of key variables, including individual differences (e.g., personality and demographic factors) and cultural/social influences (e.g., AIDS, computer technology) on various types of relationships (e.g., professional, romantic, family). A thorough, systematic examination of relevant theory and research regarding interpersonal/relational communication is offered. This focus is intended for students planning to enter graduate programs in speech communication (and related disciplines) and/or to apply this knowledge to their personal and professional lives.

Major Degree Requirements (42 semester hours)

Pre-major courses
All of these:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

Communication theory
COM 239 Theories of Communication (3)

Research Methods
Two of these:
DSC 205 Business Statistics (4)* or
        STA 261 Statistics (4) or
        STA 301 Applied Statistics (3) and
COM 262 Communication Research (3) or
COM 341 Methods of Rhetorical Criticism (3)**
* Prerequisite for COM 262
** Prerequisite is COM 239

Context Area
Nine hours from these:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 231 Small Group Communication (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 336 Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3)*
COM 339 Introduction to Organizational Communication (3)
COM 428 Communication in Conflict Management (3)
COM 434 Nonverbal Communication (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
* Required course

Culture and Diversity
One of these:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 247 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 282 Sexualities and Film (3)
COM 354 Media and Society (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
COM 441 Rhetoric of Religion (3)
COM 446 International Mass Communication (3)
COM 461 Gender and the Media (3)

Elective
Take one additional COM course

Note: You may count a course in one category only.

Related Hours (12 required)*
AMS 392 Sex and Gender in American Culture (3)
ATH 265 Language and Culture (3)
ATH 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
ATH 331 Social Anthropology (3)
EDL 334 Youth Subcultures, Popular Culture, and the Non-Formal Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts (3)
EDP 356 Human Development (3)
FSW 261 Diverse Family Systems Across Life Cycle (3)
FSW 262 Current Controversies (4)
FSW 281 Child Development in Diverse Families (3)
FSW 312 Human Behavior in the Social Environment (3)
FSW 361 Couple Relationships: Diversity and Change (3)
FSW 381 Parent/Child Relationships in Diverse Families (3)
FSW 461 Marital Distress and Divorce: Implications for Family Life Professionals (3)
FSW 464 Perspectives on Close Relationships (3)
FSW 466 Later Life Families (3)
FSW 475 Family Theories (3)
FSW 498 Critical Thinking About Family Relationships (4)
GTY 472 Minority Aging (3)
ITS 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
MGT 291 Organizational Behavior and Theory (3)
MGT 303 Human Resource Management (3)
MGT 381 Managerial Development Seminar (3)
MGT 405 Labor Relations and Conflict Management (3)
MGT 415 Leadership and Learning (3)
PHL/WMS 255 Contemporary Feminism (4)
PHL 312 Contemporary Moral Problems (4)
PSY 221 Social Psychology (3)
PSY 241 Personality (3)
PSY 325 Psychology of Prejudice and Minority Experience (3)
PSY 326 Psychology of Women (3)
PSY 328 Psychology of Stigma and Victimization (3)
PSY 344 Analysis of Interpersonal Behavior in Small Groups (3)
SOC 203 Sociology of Gender (3)
SOC 221 Human Sexuality (3)
SOC 258 Self and Society (3)
SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 361 Sociology of Families (3)
SOC 448 The African American Experience (3)
SOC 463 Gender and Aging (3)
SPA 104 Ableism 101 (3)
SPA 233 Perspective of the Human Face (3)

Program Requirements: Organizational Communication

The purpose of this focus is to prepare students to understand, explain, and predict how communication affects organizational systems and performance. Students are encouraged to apply communication theories and methods to a variety of organizational issues. Students gain a better understanding of how people interact to perform tasks, how communication can be improved in the organization, and how the organization can be improved through communication.

Major Degree Requirements (46 semester hours)

Pre-major courses
All of these:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

Communication theory
COM 239 Theories of Communication (3)

Research Methods
Two of these:
DSC 205 Business Statistics (4)* or
        STA 261 Statistics (4) or
        STA 301 Applied Statistics (3) and
COM 262 Communication Research (3) or
COM 341 Methods of Rhetorical Criticism (3)**
* Prerequisite for COM 262
** Prerequisite is COM 239

Context Area
These two:
COM 339 Introduction to Organizational Communication (3)
COM 439 Advanced Organizational Communication (3)

One of these:
COM 231 Small Group Communication (3)
COM 259 Introduction to Strategic Communication and Public Relations (3)
COM 336 Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3)
COM 428 Communication in Conflict Management (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
COM 443 Seminar in Mass Media Management (3)

Culture and Diversity
One of these:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 247 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 282 Sexualities and Film (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
COM 441 Rhetoric of Religion (3)
COM 446 International Mass Communication (3)
COM 461 Gender and the Media (3)

Elective
Take one additional COM course

Note: You may count a course in one category only.

Related Hours (12 hours required)

ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
ECO 385 Government and Business (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts (3)
EDP 301 Assessment and Evaluation in Educational Settings (3)
EDP 356 Human Development (3)
ENG 315 Business Writing (3)
IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (3)
MGT 291 Organizational Behavior and Theory (3)
MGT 302 Operations Management (3)
MGT 303 Human Resource Management (3)
MGT 381 Managerial Communication and Consulting (3)
MGT 402 Employment Law (3)
MGT 404 Compensation Management (3)
MGT 405 Labor Relations and Conflict Management (3)
MGT 406 Staffing Organizations (3)
MGT 414 Motivation and Work (3)
MGT 415 Leadership and Learning (3)
MGT 475 Organizational Change Management (3)
MIS 235 Information Technology and the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
MIS 281 Application Development Tools and Environment (3)
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3)
MKT 293 Entrepreneurship: Dilemmas and Debates (3)
MKT 401 Sales Management (3)
POL 261 Public Administration (4)
POL 362 Administrative Politics and Decision-Making (3)
POL 364 Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations (3)
POL 381 Global Governance (3)
POL 468 Public Personnel Administration (3)
PSY 262 Business Psychology (3)
SOC 205 Comparative Sociology (3)
SOC 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3)
SOC 335 Sociology of Education (3)
SOC 347 Urban Sociology (3)
SOC 417 Economy and Society (3)
SOC 454 Formal Organization (3)

Program Requirements: Rhetorical Influence

This focus involves exploration of relationships among sources, messages, and audiences in a variety of social influence contexts. Students explore theory and research in informative and suasory discourse as well as analyze issues and ideas in particular rhetorical situations. This focus is for students who wish to understand how people attempt to influence others, how public communication bonds people in communities, and how discourse enables people to reach decisions about perplexing public issues. This focus is appropriate for students entering a variety of professions, preparing for law school, or continuing their education in rhetoric and/or social influence.

Miami Forensics, 157 Bachelor Hall, sponsors programs in debate and individual events as a co-curricular activity for sharpening skills associated with rhetoric. Forensics students create their own public speaking materials and travel nationally to competitive tournaments.

Major Degree Requirements (42 semester hours)

Pre-major courses
All of these:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

Communication theory
COM 239 Theories of Communication (3)

Research Methods
Two of these:
DSC 205 Business Statistics (4)* or
        STA 261 Statistics (4) or
        STA 301 Applied Statistics (3) and
COM 262 Communication Research (3) or
COM 341 Methods of Rhetorical Criticism (3)**
* Prerequisite for COM 262
** Prerequisite is COM 239

Context Area
Nine hours from these:
COM 259 Introduction to Strategic Communication and Public Relations (3)
COM 332 Argumentation and Debate (3)
COM 335 Public Discourse in Western Thought (3)
COM 354 Media and Society (3)
COM 389 Great Issues in American History: Rhetoric and Reality (3)
COM 417 Methods of Teaching Speech Communication (3)
COM 431 Persuasion Theory and Research (3)
COM 437 Advocacy in Contemporary America (3)
COM 438 Political Communication (3)
COM 447 Mass Media Criticism (3)

Culture and Diversity
One of these:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 247 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 282 Sexualities and Film (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
COM 441 Rhetoric of Religion (3)
COM 446 International Mass Communication (3)
COM 461 Gender and the Media (3)

Elective
Take one additional COM course

Note: You may count a course in one category only.

Related Hours (12 hours required)*

AMS 206 Approaches to American Culture (3)
AMS 241 Religions of the American Peoples (4)
AMS 242 Religious Pluralism in Modern America (4)
AMS 341 Protestantism and the Development of the American Culture (4)
AMS 363 The Early American Republic: 1783-1815 (3)
AMS 382 Women in American History (3)
AMS 392 Sex and Gender in American Culture (3)
AMS 397 American Environmental History (3)
ARC 427 The American City Since 1940 (3)
ATH 231 Perspectives on Culture (3)
ATH 302 Intercultural Relations (3)
BWS 370E Feminism and the Diaspora: U.S. Women of Color (3)
CLS 310D Democracy and Identity in Ancient Athens (3)
ENG 161 Literature and Politics (3)
ENG 261 Literature and Identity (3)
ENG 368 Feminist Literary Theory and Practice (3)
ENG 370 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory (3)
ENG 401 The Role of Women in a Transforming Society (3)
ENG 406 Discourse Analysis: Speech Acts in Context (3)
ENG 411/511 Visual Rhetoric for Technical and Scientific Communicators (3)
GEO 455 Race, Urban Change, and Conflict in America (3)
HST 250 History and Popular Culture (3)
HST 326 Islam (3)
IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (3)
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3)
POL 201 Political Thinking (4)
POL 248 Urban and Community Politics (4)
POL 261 Public Administration (4)
POL 271 World Politics (4)
POL 307 Public Opinion Laboratory (3)
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Politics (3)
POL 342 American Political Careers (3)
POL 343 American Presidency (3)
POL 344 U.S. Congress (3)
POL 345 National Issues (3)
POL 346 Global Gender Politics (3)
POL 355 Public Opinion and Political Behavior (3)
POL 356 Mass Media and Politics (3)
POL 357 Politics of Organized Interests (3)
PSY 221 Social Psychology (3)
PSY 262 Business Psychology (3)
SOC 201 Social Problems (4)
SOC 203 Sociology of Gender (3)
SOC 258 Self and Society (3)
SOC 272 Women and Popular Culture (4)
SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 411 Social Conflict (3)
WMS 201 Introduction to Women's Studies (3)

Speech Pathology and Audiology: Bachelor of Science

For information contact the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 2 Bachelor Hall (513-529-2500).

Miami offers the Bachelor of Science in speech pathology and audiology. The State of Ohio requires a series of graduate courses in order to practice as a speech pathologist or audiologist; you cannot be licensed in Ohio without the required graduate courses. More information is available from the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology and on the Department's website.

Special Admission Requirements

Enter the program as a pre-speech pathology and audiology major and take these four courses:

SPA 127 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3)
SPA 216 Introduction to Audiology (3)
SPA 222 Anatomy of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism (3)
SPA 223 Theories of Language (3)

Students may apply for admission to the major after taking the four pre-major courses and if they have earned a cumulative g.p.a. of 3.00 and a 3.00 in the SPA pre-major courses.

Program Requirements: Bachelor of Science
(59-60 semester hours)

All of these:
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Educational Environments (3)
EDP 256 Psychology of the Exceptional Learner (3)
FSW 281 Child Development (4)
PHY 131 Physics for Music (3)
SPA 225 Neuroscience and Communication Behavior (3)
SPA 293 Sophomore Seminar in Speech Pathology and Audiology (1)
SPA 326 Therapy for the Hearing Handicapped (3)
SPA 334 Clinical Phonetics and Articulation Disorders (3)
SPA 393 Junior Seminar in Speech Pathology and Audiology (1)
SPA 426 Language Disorders (3)
SPA 427 Alternative Communication Systems for the Severely Handicapped (2)
SPA 435 Speech and Hearing Science (3)
SPA 441 Speech and Hearing Therapy in Public Schools (2)
SPA 493 Senior Seminar in Speech Pathology and Audiology (1)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
ZOO 161 Human Physiology (4)

Statistics: Bachelor of Science

This program is described with Mathematics and Statistics.

Strategic Communication: Bachelor of Arts

Strategic communication is the study of how organizations and individuals use communication to negotiate their role in society. Public relations is a central aspect of strategic communication and involves the study of how organizations utilize responsible behavior and two-way communication in order to influence opinions and behavior of key publics (e.g., employees, consumers, government, community, media) as well as to respond and adapt to the concerns of these publics.

Students explore communication contexts, theories, and processes as a means of understanding and critically analyzing social influence. In addition, students learn to evaluate challenges and engage in strategic communication to respond to them. This degree is for those planning to enter graduate school in communication and related disciplines, including law school, and/or to apply this knowledge to their chosen career (e.g., corporate, nonprofit, governmental, social issues, public relations, public affairs, or related areas that call for a strong liberal arts background).

You are encouraged to join Miami University's chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA), a national organization for students. PRSSA members learn more about public relations and strategic communication, network with other students and professionals across the country, gain practical hands-on experience through a variety of committee activities and a student-run public relations firm, locate job and internship opportunities, serve their community, and develop strong leadership skills. More information is available in the Department of Communication office.

Special Admission Requirements

Enter the program as a pre-communication major and take these three courses:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

Students may apply for admission to the major (which is selective) after taking the three pre-major courses and after completing 30 hours. Admission is determined on the following criteria: cumulative g.p.a.; pre-major g.p.a.; and the qualifying exam over COM 134, 135, and 143. The same criteria for admission apply to transfer students.

Program Requirements (49 semester hours)

Pre-major courses
All of these:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

Communication theory and research courses
All of these:
COM 233 Contemporary Theories of Communication (3) or
        COM 239 Rhetorical Theory (3)
COM 259 Introduction to Strategic Communication and Public Relations (3)
COM 262 Introduction to Quantitative Communication Research (3)
COM 359 Strategic Communication Planning (3)
COM 431 Persuasion Theory and Research (3) or
        COM 437 Advocacy in Contemporary America (3)
COM 459 Capstone in Strategic Communication and Public Relations (3)
Six (6) hours of COM electives (mass communication or speech communication courses)

Note: No more than 4 hours of COM 440, Internship and/or Independent Study may be counted in this category.

Related application courses - statistics, marketing, and journalism
JRN 201 News Reporting and Writing for All Media I (3)
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4)

One course chosen from among:
        COM 258 Copywriting for Electronic Media (3)
        JRN 202 News Writing and Reporting for All Media II (3)
        JRN 312 Public Affairs Reporting (3)
        JRN 316 News Presentation (3)
        JRN 318 Feature Writing (3)
       JRN 417 Editorial Writing (3)

Three hours chosen from among:
        ENG 411 Visual Rhetoric for Technical and Scientific Communication (3)
       IMS 101D Database (1)
        IMS 101F Web Animation (1)
        IMS 101G Presentation Graphics/Multimedia (1)
        IMS 101H World Wide Web, Publishing, Home Page Construction (1)
        IMS 101P Desktop Publishing (1)
        IMS 101V Digital Video Editing (1)

Urban and Regional Planning: Bachelor of Arts

For information contact the Department of Geography, 216 Shideler Hall (513-529-5010). This major is for students interested in an integrated view of urban affairs and an introduction to planning principles.

Program Requirements (40 semester hours)

Planning principles. All of these:
GEO 101 Global Forces/Local Diversity (3)
GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3)
GEO 451 Urban and Regional Planning (3)
GEO 459 Advanced Urban and Regional Planning (3)

Development issues. One of these:
GEO 454 Urban Geography (3)
GEO 457 Global Cities (3)
GEO 462 Public Space (3)
GEO 464 Marketing Geography (3)
GEO 467 Land Use, Law, and the State (3)
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment (3)
GEO 492 Geography of the Auto Industry (3)
GEO 493 Urban Field Experience (3)
Selected GEO 460 courses with permission of primary adviser.

Social issues. One of these:
AMS 204 Introduction to Public History (3)
ARC 405H Habitat and Human Settlement (3)
ARC 405Q Housing Case Studies (3)
ARC 427 The American City Since 1940 (3)
ATH/ GTY 476 Environment and Aging
BWS/SOC 325 Identity: Race, Gender, and Class (3)
BWS/ SOC 348 American Minority Relations (3)
BWS/SOC 362 Family Poverty (3)
GEO 455 Race, Urban Change and Conflict in America (3)
GEO 458 Cities of Difference (3)
GEO 476 Global Poverty (3)
SOC 234 Historic Preservation (3)
SOC 347 Urban Sociology (3)
Selected GEO 460 courses with permission of primary adviser.

Administration and politics. One of these:
ECO 331 Public Sector Economics (3)
ECO 385 Government and Business (3)
ECO 435 Urban and Regional Economics (3)
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization (3)
POL 261 Public Administration (4)
POL 362 Administrative Politics and Decision Making (3)
POL 363 Administrative Law (3)
POL 364 Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations (3)
POL 467 Public Budgeting (3)
POL 468 Public Personnel Administration (3)

Analytic techniques for planning. Both of these:
GEO 241 Map Interpretation (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4)

Other tools. One of these:
GEO 437 Regional Land Use Capability Analysis (3)
GEO 441 Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 442 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 444 GIScience in Landscape Ecology (3)
GEO 447 Aerial Photo Interpretation (4)
GEO 448 Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing (3)
Selected GEO 460 courses with permission of primary adviser.

Concentration. Courses in one of these tracks to total 40 hours in your major:
Development track: Courses listed under Development issues above.
Social track: Courses listed under Social issues above.
Analytic track: Courses listed under Analytic techniques above.
General track: Any courses listed above, in consultation with adviser.

Women's Studies: Bachelor of Arts

For information, contact the Women's Studies Program Office, 126 MacMillan Hall (513-529-4616).

This is an interdisciplinary program emphasizing women as subjects of inquiry and gender as a mode of analysis. You analyze multiple fields of difference, including, race, generation, sexual orientation, class, and nationality. Courses are organized around practices and theories of contemporary feminist research. Choose from three areas of focus or design a focus area in consultation with a Women's Studies adviser. Disciplines represented include architecture, art, classics, education, English, family studies, foreign languages, history, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, sociology, theatre, business, and the sciences. Flexibility of the major requirements allows you to design a program to suit your needs and interests. This major prepares you for graduate or professional school and for a career in research and writing, a nonprofit agency, public policy, social services, business, law, or communication.

Departmental Honors

To receive departmental honors you must complete WMS 470 (3 credit hours), register for one additional credit of WMS 470 which entails the completion of a special activism project, and have a cumulative g.p.a. of 3.50 in the major. Students must register their intent to pursue departmental honors and file a proposal for their activism project in the WMS program office, 126 MacMillan.

Program Requirements (30 semester hours)

Core Courses (15-17 semester hours)

Both of these:
WMS 201 Introduction to Women's Studies (MPF) (3)
WMS 301 Women and Difference: Intersections of Race, Class, and Sexuality (3)

One of these:
WMS/ PHL 355 Feminist Theory (4)
WMS/ ENG 368 Feminist Literary Theory and Practice (3)
WMS/ FRE 431 French Feminist Theory (3) or
a feminist theory course approved by a WMS adviser

One of these:
WMS/ BWS 370E Feminism and Diaspora: U.S. Women of Color (MPC) (3)
WMS 401 Women in Transforming Society (MPC) (3)

Focus Area (18 semester hours)

Nine hours must be 300 or 400 level in one of the following areas. A maximum of six semester hours in an approved internship, community action, or service-learning experience may be substituted for course work. A course cannot count both as a core course and an elective. Some courses have prerequisites. Because some courses vary in content, the Women's Studies Program publishes a list of approved courses prior to every semester.

Gender, race, and nation
ART 480M Gender in Medieval Art (3)
ART 480W Women in Medieval Art (3)
ATH/BWS/LAS/ WMS 325 Identity: Race, Gender, Class, Sexuality (3)
BWS/ WMS 370E Feminism and the Diaspora: U.S. Women of Color (3)*
BWS/ SOC 448 The African-American Experience (3)
CLS/ WMS 235 Women in Classical Antiquity (3)
CLS/REL/WMS 334 Women's Religious Experiences in the Ancient Mediterranean (3)
ENG/ WMS 233 British Women Writers (3)
ENG 338 African American Writing, 1946-Present (3)
FRE/WMS 431 French Feminist Theory (3)*
FST/ENG/WMS 350B Women in Film (3)
FSW 365 Family Life Sexuality Education Across Cultures (3)
GEO/ WMS 436 Women, Gender, and the Environment (3)
HST/WMS 250B Gender and Third-World Film (3)**
HST/ WMS 381 Women in Pre-Industrial Europe (3)
HST/ WMS 382 Women in American History (3)
HST 383 Women in Chinese History (3)
HST 393 Politics of Gender in Early North American History (3)
HST/WMS 400 Capstone in History (3)**
HST/WMS 450 Topics in Women's History (3)
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3)
REL/WMS 333 Religion, Status, and Dress (3)
SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SPN/WMS 180 Minority Writers in the U.S. (3)
WMS 390B Native American Women (3)
WMS 410 Advanced Topics in Women's Studies (1-4)

Women, social systems, and sexuality
ATH/BWS/LAS/ WMS 325 Identity: Race, Gender, Class, Sexuality (3)
CLS/ WMS 235 Women in Classical Antiquity (3)
ECO/ WMS 370.N Women, Gender, and the Economy (3)
EDP/WMS 180J Girls Learning, Women Teaching (3)
ENG/WMS 180 Reading about Motherhood (3)
FSW 261 Diverse Families Across Life Cycles (3)
FSW/ WMS 361 Couple Relationships: Diversity and Change (3)
FSW/ BWS 362 Family Poverty (3)
FSW 365 Family Life and Sexuality Across Culture (3)
FSW/SOC/WMS 451 Family Violence (3)
HST/ WMS 381 Women in Pre-Industrial Europe (3)
HST/ WMS 382 Women in American History (3)
HST/WMS 383 Women in Chinese History (3)
MGT/ECO/MKT/WMS 320P Women, Gender, and Business (3)
PHL/ENG 410 The Social Contract (4)
PHL/WMS 410 Psychoanalysis and Feminism (4)
PHS/WMS 243 Women's Health Care (3)
PHS/WMS 450K Nutritional Concerns of Women (3)
PHS/WMS 475 Women, Gender Relations, and Sport (3)
POL/WMS 346 Women and Politics (3)
POL/WMS 347 Women and the Law (3)
PSY/WMS 326 Psychology of Women (3)
REL/WMS 333 Religion, Dress, and Status (3)
SOC/WMS 203 Sociology of Gender Roles (3)
SOC/WMS 221 Human Sexuality (3)
SOC/WMS 272 Women and Popular Culture (3)
SOC 361 Sociology of Families (3)
SOC/WMS 463 Sociology of the Older Woman (3)
WMS 410 Advanced Topics in Women's Studies (1-4)

Women, culture, and representation
ARC/WMS 405O Gender Constructions in Architecture (3)
ART 282 Art and Politics (3)
ART/WMS 480M Gender in Medieval Art (3)
ART/WMS 480W Feminist Art Histories (3)
BWS/ WMS 370E Feminism and the Diaspora: U.S. Women of Color (3)*
CLS/ WMS 235 Women in Classical Antiquity (3)
FRE/WMS 431 French Feminist Theory (3)*
FST/ENG/WMS 350B Women in Film (3)
ENG/WMS 180 Reading about Motherhood (3)
ENG/ WMS 232 American Women Writers (3)
ENG/ WMS 233 British Women Writers (3)
ENG/ WMS 368 Feminist Literary Theory and Practice (3)*
ENG/ WMS 468 Gender and Genre (3)
FST/HST/WMS 250B Gender and Third-World Film (3)**
REL/WMS 333 Religion, Dress, and Status (3)
SOC 272 Women and Popular Culture (3)
THE 393 Cultural, Ethnic, and Gender Issues in Dramatic Literature:
       Feminist Perspectives (3)
WMS 410 Advanced Topics in Women's Studies (1-4)

* If this is used as a required theory course, it cannot count as an elective.
** Only those sections of HST 250 and 400 that are cross-listed with WMS count toward the major; consult with your adviser.

Zoology: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science

For information contact the Department of Zoology, 212 Pearson Hall (513-529-3100).

Program Requirements: Bachelor of Arts
(32 semester hours)

Two of these:
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4) or
        ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (4)
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4) or
        ZOO 116 Biological Concepts (4)

Advanced courses requirement:
The remaining 24 semester hours must be in courses 200 level or above. No more than three semester hours of independent study courses (e.g., ZOO 320, 340, 277, 377, 419.R, 477) can be used. Only ZOO 320 and 419R may be taken for a letter grade.

No specific courses are required, but these are recommended:
ZOO 203 Cell Biology (3)
ZOO 204 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)
ZOO 305 Animal Physiology (4)
ZOO 342 Genetics (3)

Also recommended, one of these:
ZOO 311 Vertebrate Zoology (4)
ZOO 312 Invertebrate Zoology (4)
ZOO 361 Patterns in Development (4)
ZOO 401 Entomology (4)
ZOO 407 Ichthyology (4)
ZOO 408 Ornithology (4)
ZOO 409 Herpetology (4)
ZOO 410 Mammalogy (4)

One 400-level course recommended.

Related Hours (18 required)

One year of chemistry:
CHM 137 or 141, 142 College Chemistry (3, 3) and
        CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)

Remaining courses may be chosen from botany, chemistry, geography, geology, mathematics, microbiology, physics, psychology, statistics, and computer science and systems analysis. A year of organic chemistry, a year of physics (with a lab), and a year of mathematics (including calculus and statistics) are highly recommended.

Program Requirements: Bachelor of Science
(36 semester hours)

All of these:
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4) or
        ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (4)
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4) or
        ZOO 116 Biological Concepts (4)
ZOO 203 Cell Biology (3)
ZOO 204 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)
ZOO 305 Animal Physiology (4)
ZOO 342 Genetics (3)

Advanced courses requirement
At least one 400-level course and additional advanced courses (200 level and above) in zoology to total 36 hours. No more than three hours of independent study courses (e.g., ZOO 320, 340, 277, 377, 419R, 477) can be used. Only ZOO 320 and 419R may be taken for a letter grade.

Related Hours (48 required)

All of these:
CHM 137 or 141, 142 College Chemistry (4, 3, 3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4) and
        CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (4) or
               CHM 241, 242 Organic Chemistry (3, 3) and
               CHM 244, 245 Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
PHY 171, 172 College Physics (3, 3) or
        PHY 181, 182 The Physical World (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 Introductory Physics Laboratory (1,1)

At least eight semester hours of mathematics (including a calculus course and a statistics course)

An additional 8 to 14 semester hours from: botany, chemistry, geography, geology, mathematics (advanced hours—200 level or above), microbiology, physics, psychology, statistics (advanced hours—200 level or above), computer science and systems analysis, and zoology (advanced hours—200 level or above).


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